A Certain Idea of France

Author: Phillip H. Gordon

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140082091X

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 1834


As France begins to confront the new challenges of the post-Cold War era, the time has come to examine how French security policy has evolved since Charles de Gaulle set it on an independent course in the 1960s. Philip Gordon shows that the Gaullist model, contrary to widely held beliefs, has lived on--but that its inherent inconsistencies have grown more acute with increasing European unification, the diminishing American military role in Europe, and related strains on French military budgets. The question today is whether the Gaullist legacy will enable a strong and confident France to play a full role in Europe's new security arrangements or whether France, because of its will to independence, is destined to play an isolated, national role. Gordon analyzes military doctrines, strategies, and budgets from the 1960s to the 1990s, and also the evolution of French policy from the early debates about NATO and the European Community to the Persian Gulf War. He reveals how and why Gaullist ideas have for so long influenced French security policy and examines possible new directions for France in an increasingly united but potentially unstable Europe.

A Certain Idea of France

Author: Julian Jackson

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 1846143527

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 928

View: 1766


'Masterly ... awesome reading ... an outstanding biography' Max Hastings, Sunday Times The definitive biography of the greatest French statesman of modern times In six weeks in the early summer of 1940, France was over-run by German troops and quickly surrendered. The French government of Marshal Pétain sued for peace and signed an armistice. One little-known junior French general, refusing to accept defeat, made his way to England. On 18 June he spoke to his compatriots over the BBC, urging them to rally to him in London. 'Whatever happens, the flame of French resistance must not be extinguished and will not be extinguished.' At that moment, Charles de Gaulle entered into history. For the rest of the war, de Gaulle frequently bit the hand that fed him. He insisted on being treated as the true embodiment of France, and quarrelled violently with Churchill and Roosevelt. He was prickly, stubborn, aloof and self-contained. But through sheer force of personality and bloody-mindedness he managed to have France recognised as one of the victorious Allies, occupying its own zone in defeated Germany. For ten years after 1958 he was President of France's Fifth Republic, which he created and which endures to this day. His pursuit of 'a certain idea of France' challenged American hegemony, took France out of NATO and twice vetoed British entry into the European Community. His controversial decolonization of Algeria brought France to the brink of civil war and provoked several assassination attempts. Julian Jackson's magnificent biography reveals this the life of this titanic figure as never before. It draws on a vast range of published and unpublished memoirs and documents - including the recently opened de Gaulle archives - to show how de Gaulle achieved so much during the War when his resources were so astonishingly few, and how, as President, he put a medium-rank power at the centre of world affairs. No previous biography has depicted his paradoxes so vividly. Much of French politics since his death has been about his legacy, and he remains by far the greatest French leader since Napoleon.

Certain Ideas of France

Author: H. L. Wesseling

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313323416

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 3877


Wesseling, one of the Netherlands' most respected contemporary historians, offers a great variety of studies and essays on modern French history and historians. The work is unique in its combination of biographical and structural approaches.

A Certain Idea of Europe

Author: Craig Parsons

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501732080

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 689


The quasi-federal European Union stands out as the major exception in the thinly institutionalized world of international politics. Something has led Europeans—and only Europeans—beyond the nation-state to a fundamentally new political architecture. Craig Parsons argues in A Certain Idea of Europe that this "something" was a particular set of ideas generated in Western Europe after the Second World War. In Parsons's view, today's European Union reflects the ideological (and perhaps visionary) project of an elite minority. His book traces the progressive victory of this project in France, where the battle over European institutions erupted most divisively. Drawing on archival research and extensive interviews with French policymakers, the author carefully traces a fifty-year conflict between radically different European plans. Only through aggressive leadership did the advocates of a supranational "community" Europe succeed at building the EU and binding their opponents within it. Parsons puts the causal impact of ideas, and their binding effects through institutions, at the center of his book. In so doing he presents a strong logic of "social construction"—a sharp departure from other accounts of EU history that downplay the role of ideas and ideology.

A Certain Idea of Europe

Author: Associate Professor of Political Science Craig Parsons,Craig Parsons

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801440861

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 9991


The quasi-federal European Union stands out as the major exception in the thinly institutionalized world of international politics. Something has led Europeans--and only Europeans--beyond the nation-state to a fundamentally new political architecture. Craig Parsons argues in A Certain Idea of Europe that this "something" was a particular set of ideas generated in Western Europe after the Second World War. In Parsons's view, today's European Union reflects the ideological (and perhaps visionary) project of an elite minority. His book traces the progressive victory of this project in France, where the battle over European institutions erupted most divisively. Drawing on archival research and extensive interviews with French policymakers, the author carefully traces a fifty-year conflict between radically different European plans. Only through aggressive leadership did the advocates of a supranational "community" Europe succeed at building the EU and binding their opponents within it. Parsons puts the causal impact of ideas, and their binding effects through institutions, at the center of his book. In so doing he presents a strong logic of "social construction"--a sharp departure from other accounts of EU history that downplay the role of ideas and ideology.

Colette's France

Author: Jane Gilmour

Publisher: Hardie Grant Books

ISBN: 1743580673

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 8718


‘A biography as sensuously satisfying as a fine French meal. Colette surely would have approved it as much for its aesthetic appeal as for its rare insight and scholarship.’ Robyn Davidson Colette’s France is the remarkable life story of an extraordinary woman, who was known simply as ‘Colette’. This lavishly illustrated biography of the French writer, who was as famous for her novels as for her often controversial life, follows her journey through the landscapes of France where she lived and loved – from a childhood in Burgundy and coming of age in the Belle Époque Paris, to Provence and St Tropez. Jane Gilmour recounts the varied lives of a sensual, artistic, rebellious woman who lived life on her own terms, from prodigious writer and journalist, risqué performer, lover and seducer, businesswoman, baroness, mother, and finally, grand old lady of letters. Dr Jane Gilmour is an Australian with a personal passion and extensive knowledge of Colette and her life. Jane lived in France for many years where she studied the writer at the Sorbonne and completed her thesis on the writer there. Jane has continued her passion for her subject frequently returning to France to write this book and to visit the regions where Colette lived, loved and worked.

France from 1851 to the Present

Author: Roger Célestin,Eliane DalMolin

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 894


A cultural history of France from a period of dominance in the mid-19th century to one of "decline" or "crisis" in the first few years of the third millennium. The first part (1851 to 1944) explores developments ranging from the transformation of Paris and the appearance of the colonial empire, to the construction of modern French society. The second part of the book follows the crisis of French universalism or of the "French exception" from the end of World War II to the contemporary period in which the "French model" has been increasingly difficult to sustain in the face of globalization, the Americanization of culture, decolonization and multiculturalism, among other developments.

West Africa

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Africa, West

Page: N.A

View: 5769