A History of My Times

Author: Xenophon

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141926856

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 8765


Xenophon's History recounts nearly fifty turbulent years of warfare in Greece between 411 and 362 BC. Continuing the story of the Peloponnesian War at the point where Thucydides finished his magisterial history, this is a fascinating chronicle of the conflicts that ultimately led to the decline of Greece, and the wars with both Thebes and the might of Persia. An Athenian by birth, Xenophon became a firm supporter of the Spartan cause, and fought against the Athenians in the battle of Coronea. Combining history and memoir, this is a brilliant account of the triumphs and failures of city-states, and a portrait of Greece at a time of crisis.

Hellenica - A History of My Times

Author: Xenophon,James H. Ford,Henry Graham Dakyns

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781934255148

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 234

View: 7635


"Hellenica is Xenophon's chronicle of the history of the Greeks, or the "Hellenes" from 411 to 359 BCE. It is a continuation of Thucydides' narrative, "History of the Peloponnesian War." This history covers the last seven years of the war, and its aftermath. It is one of the few surviving narratives from this period and is generally considered to be the most authoritative. The author Xenophon was born in Athens about 430BCE. It may be inferred from passages in the Hellenica that he fought at Arginusae (406), and that he was present at the return of Alcibiades (408), the trial of the Generals, and the overthrow of the Thirty. In 401, being invited by his friend Proxenus to join the expedition of the younger Cyrus against his brother, Artaxerxes II of Persia, he at once accepted the offer. Of the expedition itself, he has given a full and detailed account in his "Anabasis: The March Up Country," sometimes called "The Persian Expedition." At Coroneia (394) he fought with the Spartans against the Athenians and Thebans, for which his fellow citizens decreed his banishment. The Spartans provided a home for him at Scillus in Ellis until Sparta and Athens became allies whereupon he then made his home at Corinth. The year of his death is thought to be 355 BCE. This restored translation contains all 7 complete books of Xenophon's narrative, including an indexed Table of Contents listing page numbers for each year of the war. This edition is recommended for teachers and students of history, classical literature and languages. Excerpt from the Table of Contents All Rights Reserved Book I BCE 411: Thymochares arrived from Athens... 1 BCE 410: The Athenians escaped to Cardia... 2 BCE 409: The Athenians fortified Thoricus... 4 BCE 408: The temple of Athena set on fire... 8 BCE 407: Phamabazus passes the winter at Gordium... 10 BCE 406: Callicratidas replaces Lysander... 16

The Best of Times, the Worst of Times

Author: Michael Burleigh

Publisher: Pan MacMillan

ISBN: 9781509847945

Category:

Page: 432

View: 9577


In the decades since the end of World War II, it has been widely assumed that the western model of liberal democracy and free trade is the way the world should be governed. However, events in the early years of the 21st century--first, the 2003 war with Iraq and its chaotic aftermath and, second, the financial crash of 2008--have threatened the general acceptance that continued progress under the benign (or sometimes not-so-benign) gaze of the western powers is the only way forwards. And as America turns inwards and Europe is beset by austerity politics and populist nationalism, the post-war consensus looks less and less secure. But is this really the worst of times? In a forensic examination of the world we now live in, acclaimed historian Michael Burleigh sets out to answer that question. Who could have imagined that China would champion globalization and lead the battle on climate change? Or that post-Soviet Russia might present a greater threat to the world's stability than ISIS? And while we may be on the cusp of still more dramatic change, perhaps the risks will--in time--bring not only change but a wholly positive transformation.