A Midwife's Tale

Author: Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307772985

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 7323


WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE Drawing on the diaries of one woman in eighteenth-century Maine, this intimate history illuminates the medical practices, household economies, religious rivalries, and sexual mores of the New England frontier. Between 1785 and 1812 a midwife and healer named Martha Ballard kept a diary that recorded her arduous work (in 27 years she attended 816 births) as well as her domestic life in Hallowell, Maine. On the basis of that diary, Laurel Thatcher Ulrich gives us an intimate and densely imagined portrait, not only of the industrious and reticent Martha Ballard but of her society. At once lively and impeccably scholarly, A Midwife's Tale is a triumph of history on a human scale.

Midwifery and Medicine in Boston

Author: Amalie M. Kass

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 386

View: 8421


Known for his medical expertise as well as his compassion and concern, Channing was highly regarded by colleagues and patients alike.".

Tales of a Midwife

Author: Maria Anderson

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0755362756

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 218

View: 2329


Maria Anderson trained as an NHS nurse and went on to become a midwife, a job she has adored for over twenty years. After fainting whilst attending her first three births, Maria went from nervous trainee to assured midwife and in her brilliant memoir she recounts the highs and lows of life inside the maternity unit. From frantic fathers and breaking her hand during a traumatic home birth, to witnessing the delivery of quads and the ultimate devastation of assisting the delivery of a stillborn baby, Maria has had an extraordinary career. Tales of a Midwife is a funny, poignant and heart-warming account of a devoted midwife.

Advanced Practice Nursing

Author: Lucille A. Joel, EdD, APN, FAAN

Publisher: F.A. Davis

ISBN: 1719647119

Category: Medical

Page: 560

View: 3853


Survive and thrive as an APN! Meet all the challenges of professional practice—whatever your specialty or environment. Noted nursing professionals and educators explore all of the non-clinical roles and responsibilities of an Advanced Practice Nurse and chart a course that enables you to meet them successfully. You’ll follow the evolution of the APN’s role from a historical perspective to the present and examine the issues and challenges you’ll encounter in the future.

Mary Breckinridge

Author: Melanie Beals Goan

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807832111

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 348

View: 9142


In 1925 Mary Breckinridge (1881-1965) founded the Frontier Nursing Service (FNS), a public health organization in eastern Kentucky providing nurses on horseback to reach families who otherwise would not receive health care. Through this public health orga

Diseases in the District of Maine 1772 - 1820

Author: Richard J. Kahn

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190053275

Category: Medical

Page: 240

View: 9440


Jeremiah Barker practiced medicine in rural Maine up until his retirement in 1818. Throughout his practice of fifty years, he documented his constant efforts to keep up with and contribute to the medical literature in a changing medical landscape, as practice and authority shifted from historical to scientific methods. He performed experiments and autopsies, became interested in the new chemistry of Lavoisier, risked scorn in his use of alkaline remedies, studied epidemic fever and approaches to bloodletting, and struggled to understand epidemic fever, childbed fever, cancer, public health, consumption, mental illness, and the "dangers of spirituous liquors." Dr. Barker intended to publish his Diseases in the District of Maine 1772-1820 by subscription - advance pledges to purchase the published volume - but for reasons that remain uncertain, that never happened. For the first time, Barker's never before published work has been transcribed and presented in its entirety with extensive annotations, a five-chapter introduction to contextualize the work, and a glossary to make it accessible to 21st century general readers, genealogists, students, and historians. This engaging and insightful new publication allows modern readers to reimagine medicine as practiced by a rural physician in New England. We know much about how elite physicians practiced 200 years ago, but very little about the daily practice of an ordinary rural doctor, attending the ordinary rural patient. Barker's manuscript is written in a clear and engaging style, easily enjoyed by general readers as well as historians, with extensive footnotes and a glossary of terms. Barker himself intended his book to be "understood by those destitute of medical science."

American Ethnographic Film and Personal Documentary

Author: Scott MacDonald

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520954939

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 424

View: 7604


American Ethnographic Film and Personal Documentary is a critical history of American filmmakers crucial to the development of ethnographic film and personal documentary. The Boston and Cambridge area is notable for nurturing these approaches to documentary film via institutions such as the MIT Film Section and the Film Study Center, the Carpenter Center and the Visual and Environmental Studies Department at Harvard. Scott MacDonald uses pragmatism’s focus on empirical experience as a basis for measuring the groundbreaking achievements of such influential filmmakers as John Marshall, Robert Gardner, Timothy Asch, Ed Pincus, Miriam Weinstein, Alfred Guzzetti, Ross McElwee, Robb Moss, Nina Davenport, Steve Ascher and Jeanne Jordan, Michel Negroponte, John Gianvito, Alexander Olch, Amie Siegel, Ilisa Barbash, and Lucien Castaing-Taylor. By exploring the cinematic, personal, and professional relationships between these accomplished filmmakers, MacDonald shows how a pioneering, engaged, and uniquely cosmopolitan approach to documentary developed over the past half century.

Catching Babies

Author: Sheena Byrom

Publisher: Headline

ISBN: 9780755362721

Category: Midwifery

Page: 320

View: 769


The inspirational story of life as a midwife. From her very first day as a nervous student nurse in Blackburn to the dedicated completion of her nursing qualifications and her training as a midwife in Burnley, Sheena Byrom has never once looked back, enjoying a thirty-five-year career with the NHS. Catching Babies is a moving account of an extraordinary career. It reveals the unique experiences that filled Sheena's days as she looked after overwhelmed mums and dads and helped to bring their precious babies into the world. At the forefront of evolving medical practices, she was the first midwife to oversee a home water birth in her area, but also found herself at the centre of a traumatic delivery that resulted in a nine-year litigation case and tested her to her limits. Yet, whatever has come Sheena's way, ultimately, there are the strong mothers who taught her so much and the little miracles who have made every single moment as a midwife truly magical.

Mighty Change, Tall Within

Author: Myra B. Young Armstead

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791487121

Category: Social Science

Page: 298

View: 4577


A history of African American presence in the Hudson Valley region from the colonial period to the present.

The Landscape of History

Author: John Lewis Gaddis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195171570

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 4490


What is history and why should we study it? Is there such a thing as historical truth? Is history a science? One of the most accomplished historians at work today, John Lewis Gaddis, answers these and other questions in this short, witty, and humane book. The Landscape of History provides a searching look at the historian's craft, as well as a strong argument for why a historical consciousness should matter to us today. Gaddis points out that while the historical method is more sophisticated than most historians realize, it doesn't require unintelligible prose to explain. Like cartographers mapping landscapes, historians represent what they can never replicate. In doing so, they combine the techniques of artists, geologists, paleontologists, and evolutionary biologists. Their approaches parallel, in intriguing ways, the new sciences of chaos, complexity, and criticality. They don't much resemble what happens in the social sciences, where the pursuit of independent variables functioning with static systems seems increasingly divorced from the world as we know it. So who's really being scientific and who isn't? This question too is one Gaddis explores, in ways that are certain to spark interdisciplinary controversy. Written in the tradition of Marc Bloch and E.H. Carr, The Landscape of History is at once an engaging introduction to the historical method for beginners, a powerful reaffirmation of it for practitioners, a startling challenge to social scientists, and an effective skewering of post-modernist claims that we can't know anything at all about the past. It will be essential reading for anyone who reads, writes, teaches, or cares about history.