A Tale of Love and Darkness

Author: Amos Oz

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448163099

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 528

View: 3071


Discover Amos Oz’s most iconic work in this extraordinary memoir that is at once a great family saga and a magical self-portrait of a writer who witnessed the birth of a nation *OVER 2 MILLION COPIES SOLD WORLDWIDE* ‘A hero of mine, a moral as well as literary giant’ Simon Schama Amos Oz's remarkable, moving story takes us on a seductive journey through his childhood and adolescence, along Jerusalem's war-torn streets in the 1940s and '50s and into a small apartment crowded with books in twelve languages and relatives speaking nearly as many. Caught between them is one small boy with the weight of generations on his shoulders. Oz dives into 120 years of family history and paradox, the saga of a Jewish love-hate affair with Europe that sweeps from Vilna and Odessa, via Poland and Prague, to Israel. Farce and heartbreak, history and humanity make up this story of clashing cultures and lives, of suffering and perseverance, of love and darkness. ‘Oz’s greatest work...not only his autobiography, but in a way the biography of Israel before it was created’ David Grossman, Observer

A Tale of Two Narratives

Author: Grace Wermenbol

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108840280

Category: History

Page: 325

View: 7603


Explores the transmission - and perpetuation - of conflict narratives in Israeli-Jewish and Palestinian society since the signing of the Oslo Accords.

Index to Jewish Periodicals

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Jewish literature

Page: N.A

View: 9773


An author and subject index to selected and American Anglo-Jewish journals of general and scholarly interests.

Judaism: All That Matters

Author: Keith Kahn-Harris

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1444156748

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 6953


For a group of people so limited in number, the Jewish community has had a huge impact on both global events and local politics. In this vibrant new look at Judaism, sociologist and cultural critic Keith Kahn-Harris provides a remarkably sharp insight into this history, and particularly the diverse Jewish communities (and diverse ideas of Jewishness) that exist today.

Radio

Author: Alasdair Pinkerton

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1789140994

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 1830


Radio is a medium of seemingly endless contradictions. Now in its third century of existence, the technology still seems startlingly modern; despite frequent predictions of its demise, radio continues to evolve and flourish in the age of the internet and social media. This book explores the history of the radio, describing its technological, political, and social evolution, and how it emerged from Victorian experimental laboratories to become a near-ubiquitous presence in our lives. Alasdair Pinkerton’s story is shaped by radio’s multiple characters and characteristics—radio waves occur in nature, for instance, but have also been harnessed and molded by human beings to bridge oceans and reconfigure our experience of space and time. Published in association with the Science Museum, London, Radio is an informative and thought-provoking book for all enthusiasts of an old technology that still has the capacity to enthuse, entertain, entice, and enrage today.

Elsewhere, Perhaps

Author: Amos Oz

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547710232

Category: Fiction

Page: 321

View: 3341


The renowned Israeli author’s debut novel. “An appealing tribute to the persistence of pathos and warmth among human beings clustered against the night.” —Kirkus Reviews Situated only two miles from a hostile border, Amos Oz’s fictional community of Metsudat Ram is a microcosm of the Israeli frontier kibbutz. There, held together by necessity and menace, the kibbutzniks share love and sorrow under the guns of their enemies and the eyes of history. “Immensely enjoyable.” —Chicago Tribune Book World “What Elsewhere, Perhaps eventually reveals is interesting. It is decidedly not what it appears to be at first: A straight-faced slice of kibbutz life told in imitation of the traditional Yiddish narrative voice of the invisible community gossip, who, begging our pardon, knows everything and tells all. No, although the narrator appears initially to be the genial voice of tradition, it soon becomes apparent that it is kidding us. It knows perfectly well we will scoff at Reuven Harish’s verses. For the story it is about to tell is compounded of nothing but ironies . . . It adds up to a charmingly unpious tapestry of Israeli life.” —The New York Times “An exquisite thinker, Oz is a rare blast of sanity and intelligence.” —The Observer “The physical circumstances are established with a painter’s skill . . . It is a rich book, its fruit pressed down and running over.” —The Sunday Times “A generous imagination at work. [Oz’s] language, for all of its sensuous imagery, has a careful and wise simplicity.” —The New York Times Book Review

Jewish Affairs

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Jews

Page: N.A

View: 612


Rhyming Life and Death

Author: Amos Oz

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0151013675

Category: Fiction

Page: 117

View: 9963


A behind-the-scenes exploration of the craft of writing as revealed by an eight-hour work day in the life of an author finds a literary celebrity passing the time during a mundane book event in Tel Aviv by inventing lives for the strangers he sees around him. By the author of A Tale of Love and Darkness.

What Makes an Apple?

Author: Amos Oz

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691219907

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 152

View: 384


"This book consists of six conversations between Amos Oz and Shira Hadad, who worked closely with Oz as the editor of his novel Judas. The interviews, which took place toward the end of Oz's life, ... capture the writer's thoughts and opinions on many of the subjects that occupied him throughout his life and career, including writing and creation, guilt and love, death and the afterlife. In the first interview, 'A Heart Pierced by an Arrow,' Oz discusses how he became a writer, along with his writing process and its attendant challenges. 'Sometimes' explores Oz's reflections on men, women, and relationships across his experience and work. 'A Room of Your Own' sketches his development as a writer on the kibbutz and his eventual decision to leave. In 'When Someone Beats up Your Child,' Oz discusses the critical reception of his work, and in 'What No Writer Can Do' he describes his experience teaching literature, including his thoughts on contemporary modes of literary instruction. In the concluding piece, 'The Lights Have Been Changing Without Us for a Long Time,' he reflects on other writers and on changes he has observed in himself and others over time"

Jewish Book World

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Jews

Page: N.A

View: 6469