Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101475455

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 4783


“Courageous and thought-provoking.” —David Brooks, The New York Times “Breathtakingly personal . . . [Chua’s] tale is as compelling as a good thriller.” —The Financial Times "[F]ascinating. . . . the most stimulating book on the subject of child rearing since Dr. Spock." —Seattle Post-Intelligencer “Chua’s memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, is a quick, easy read. It’s smart, funny, honest and a little heartbreaking . . .” —Chicago Sun-Times At once provocative and laugh-out-loud funny, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother ignited a global parenting debate with its story of one mother’s journey in strict parenting. Amy Chua argues that Western parenting tries to respect and nurture children’s individuality, while Chinese parents typically believe that arming children with skills, strong work habits, and inner confidence prepares them best for the future. Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother chronicles Chua’s iron-willed decision to raise her daughters, Sophia and Lulu, the Chinese way – and the remarkable, sometimes heartbreaking results her choice inspires. Achingly honest and profoundly challenging, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is one of the most talked-about books of our times.

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

Author: Amy Chua

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408813165

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 8483


A lot of people wonder how Chinese parents raise such stereotypically successful kids. They wonder what Chinese parents do to produce so many math whizzes and music prodigies, what it's like inside the family, and whether they could do it too. Well, I can tell them, because I've done it... Amy Chua's daughters, Sophia and Louisa (Lulu) were polite, interesting and helpful, they were two years ahead of their classmates in maths and had exceptional musical abilities. But Sophia and Lulu were never allowed to attend a sleepover, be in a school play, choose their own extracurricular activities, get any grade less than an A, and not be the #1 student in every subject (except gym and drama). And they had to practice their instruments for hours every day, as well as in school breaks and on family holidays. The Chinese-parenting model certainly seemed to produce results. But what happens when you do not tolerate disobedience and are confronted by a screaming child who would sooner freeze outside in the cold than be forced to play the piano? In Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Amy Chua relates her experiences raising her children the 'Chinese way', and how dutiful, patient Sophia flourished under the regime and how tenacious, hot-tempered Lulu rebelled. It is a story about a mother, two daughters, and two dogs. It's also about Mozart and Mendelssohn, the piano and the violin, and how they made it to Carnegie Hall. It was supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones. But instead, it's about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how you can be humbled by a thirteen-year-old. Witty, entertaining and provocative, this is a unique and important book that will transform your perspective of parenting forever.

The Girl at the Baggage Claim

Author: Gish Jen

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101947837

Category: Psychology

Page: 336

View: 7668


A provocative and important study of the different ideas Easterners and Westerners have about the self and society and what this means for current debates in art, education, geopolitics, and business. Never have East and West come as close as they are today, yet we are still baffled by one another. Is our mantra "To thine own self be true"? Or do we believe we belong to something larger than ourselves--a family, a religion, a troop--that claims our first allegiance? Gish Jen--drawing on a treasure trove of stories and personal anecdotes, as well as cutting-edge research in cultural psychology--reveals how this difference shapes what we perceive and remember, what we say and do and make--how it shapes everything from our ideas about copying and talking in class to the difference between Apple and Alibaba. As engaging as it is illuminating, this is a book that stands to profoundly enrich our understanding of ourselves and of our world.

The Oxford Handbook of Multicultural Identity

Author: Veronica Benet-Martinez,Ying-Yi Hong

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199796750

Category: Psychology

Page: 560

View: 7635


Multiculturalism is a prevalent worldwide societal phenomenon. Aspects of our modern life, such as migration, economic globalization, multicultural policies, and cross-border travel and communication have made intercultural contacts inevitable. High numbers of multicultural individuals (23-43% of the population by some estimates) can be found in many nations where migration has been strong (e.g., Australia, U.S., Western Europe, Singapore) or where there is a history of colonization (e.g., Hong Kong). Many multicultural individuals are also ethnic and cultural minorities who are descendants of immigrants, majority individuals with extensive multicultural experiences, or people with culturally mixed families; all people for whom identification and/or involvement with multiple cultures is the norm. Despite the prevalence of multicultural identity and experiences, until the publication of this volume, there has not yet been a comprehensive review of scholarly research on the psychological underpinning of multiculturalism. The Oxford Handbook of Multicultural Identity fills this void. It reviews cutting-edge empirical and theoretical work on the psychology of multicultural identities and experiences. As a whole, the volume addresses some important basic issues, such as measurement of multicultural identity, links between multilingualism and multiculturalism, the social psychology of multiculturalism and globalization, as well as applied issues such as multiculturalism in counseling, education, policy, marketing and organizational science, to mention a few. This handbook will be useful for students, researchers, and teachers in cultural, social, personality, developmental, acculturation, and ethnic psychology. It can also be used as a source book in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses on identity and multiculturalism, and a reference for applied psychologists and researchers in the domains of education, management, and marketing.

Student Diversity at the Big Three

Author: Marcia Graham Synnott

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 1412848040

Category: Education

Page: 384

View: 7093


Strengthening affirmative action programs and fighting discrimination present challenges to America’s best private and public universities. US college enrollments swelled from 2.6 million students in 1955 to 17.5 million by 2005. Ivy League universities, specifically Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, face significant challenges in maintaining their professed goal to educate a reasonable number of students from all ethnic, racial, religious, and socio-economic groups while maintaining the loyalty of their alumni. College admissions officers in these elite universities have the daunting task of selecting a balanced student body. Added to their challenges, the economic recession of 2008-2009 negatively impacted potential applicants from lower-income families. Evidence suggests that high Standard Aptitude Test (SAT) scores are correlated with a family’s socioeconomic status. Thus, the problem of selecting the "best" students from an ever-increasing pool of applicants may render standardized admissions tests a less desirable selection mechanism. The next admissions battle may be whether well-endowed universities should commit themselves to a form of class-based affirmative action in order to balance the socioeconomic advantages of well-to-do families. Such a policy would improve prospects for students who may have ambitions for an education that is beyond their reach without preferential treatment. As in past decades, admissions policies may remain a question of balances and preferences. Nevertheless, the elite universities are handling admission decisions with determination and far less prejudice than in earlier eras.

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter

Author: Diana Holquist

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781523955749

Category:

Page: 256

View: 3015


Five years after Amy Chua's Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother burst onto the scene, it's still a cultural phenomenon. Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter is a systematic response to that book. It's a brutally honest, hilarious parenting memoir that explores the explosive issues raised by Tiger Mother, arguing that the only parenting battle worth fighting is the one against our own worst selves. How one family fought the myth that you have to destroy childhood to raise extraordinary adults. What does a "successful" child look like? If you imagined a straight-A-earning, classical-music-playing, rule-following, Ivy-bound prodigy, you're not alone. This is what I thought my kid should look like, too. I was determined to raise my child in this image, no matter the cost. After all, I was one of those kids. The traditional path to success sure worked for me. But life intervened in ways I couldn't have imagined. I was faced with two choices: Impose my will no matter the trauma. Or, take a frightening, uncharted path- -to where? A sub-standard child, unable to succeed on the level I had? Did letting up mean letting my child down? Answering these questions took my family on a fascinating journey. What looked and felt like failure after failure on adult terms led to a different kind of success: mad creativity, fierce independence, and relentless self-direction. In other words, everything an adult needs to make it in today's world. So what does a successful child look like? She looks like my child. Maybe she also looks a lot like yours. "Want your child to be creative, independent, mentally balanced and ready to take on the world? Read Battle Hymn of the Tiger Daughter, the story of one American kid, one American mother, lots of self-doubt, and eventual triumph--the American way." --Goodreads.com "I enjoyed it more than the Tiger Mother version! the daughter's POV is interesting. She's a smart girl without parental influence. Mom was smart to let her little ones shine on their own!" --Goodreads.com (Diana Holquist is the award-winning author of six novels and the parody children's book, The Rabbit Who Wants to Go to Harvard. She's won the New York Book Festival award for Best Novel; has garnered a coveted starred review from Publisher's Weekly; and, she's been a RITA and Reader's Choice Award finalist. A graduate of Columbia University, she lives in Philadelphia with her husband, two kids, and three cats. She also writes small-town women's fiction under the pseudonym Sophie Gunn.) PRAISE FOR NOVELS BY DIANA HOLQUIST "With characters so real, they jump off the page..." --Doubleday Book Club "(Holquist)...raises some serious issues, leaving readers' eyes shining both with happiness and tears." --Library Journal "...laughter, passion and deeply moving sentiment." --New York Times Bestseller Robyn Carr "...Holquist is one for the keeper shelf." --Parksberg News and Sentinel "A real treat for readers..." --New York Times Bestseller Susan Wiggs "A delightful debut..." --Booklist, starred review "...humor, warmth, emotions, characters that step off the page..." --New York Times Bestseller Mariah Stewart

Amy Chua: Life of a Tiger Mother

Author: Debbie J.

Publisher: Hyperink Inc

ISBN: 1614647208

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 29

View: 379


ABOUT THE BOOK Amy Chua was a wellrespected and highprofile Yale Law Professor who published two bestsellers yet, no one seemed to have taken much notice of her. Then everything changed. In January, 2011 Chua published her explosive memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, which propelled her into the spotlight. Within weeks, Amy Chua was on Time.com 's top ten list of the most thoughtprovoking, angerinducing, and viral viewpoints of the year. Before 2011 ended, she was nominated one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people in the world. In Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Amy Chua details her own unique take on parenting and uses her own family model as proof that Chinese mothers raise successful children. Chua argues that although people hesitate to accept the notion of cultural stereotypes in parenting, the truth is that many studies support significant measurable differences in parenting between Chinese and Westerners. The book created a firestorm of controversy and sparked a robust and active dialogue about how cultural styles impact upbringing. Although Chua offered the disclaimer that being a "Chinese mother" does not mean you must be Chinese in ethnicity, but simply a parent who ignores the style of parenting that has become common in Western societies, a Wall Street Journal excerpt that appeared the day prior to the book's release fanned the flames of controversy and linked the topic firmly with Chinese culture. Entitled Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior, the essay elicited an astounding 8,800 comments in response from readers, some offering praise, but most vilifying Amy Chua as a parent. MEET THE AUTHOR Debbie J. is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading! EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK Amy L. Chua was born October 26, 1962, in Champaign, Illinois. Her Chinese immigrant parents came to the United States from the Philippines in 1961, eloping together to pursue advanced degrees at MIT. They were extremely strict, but loving. Amy Chua was the eldest of four girls. Amy and her sisters Michelle, Katrin, and Cynthia (Cindy) were raised in the Roman Catholic faith, and lived in West Lafayette, Indiana. Chua recalls that her father worked until three in the morning to make a good life for his family, and that he took great pleasure in introducing his family to American pastimes and activities such as tacos, Sloppy Joes, Dairy Queen, sledding, skiing, camping. The day her parents became naturalized citizens is a moment Amy Chua recalls with great pride. Her parents both grew up in the Philippines under Japanese occupation, and came to the States after celebrating liberation under General Douglas MacArthur. Although her father's family was very wealthy, her mother came from a poor but intellectual family. The Chua family's reenactment of the American dream is a theme woven through Chua's second book. Her father, Leon Ong Chua, was born June 28, 1936. After earning his first degree in the Philippines in 1959, he came to the United States on a scholarship, eventually completing his PhD at the University of Illinois in 1964. While the family lived in Indiana, he was an academic at Purdue University. When Amy was eight years old, the family moved to Berkeley, California, where Leon Chua became Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences professor at the University of California in Berkeley. He is known for formulating the Memristor theory in 1971, a method of memory resistance through use of a passive twoterminal electrical component. He is also considered the father of nonlinear circuit theory and cellular neural networks, and invented Chua's circuit. He has since been awarded eight honorary doctorates, and remains active in research and writing. CHAPTER OUTLINE ...and much more

Tiger Babies Strike Back

Author: Kim Wong Keltner

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062229303

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 6896


An answer to Amy Chua’s Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, author Kim Wong Keltner’s Tiger Babies Strike Back takes the control-freak beast by the tail with a humorous and honest look at the issues facing women today—Chinese-American and otherwise. Keltner, the author of the novels Buddha Baby and I Want Candy, mines her own past in an attempt to dispel the myth that all Chinese women are Tiger Mothers. Keltner strikes back at Chua’s argument through topics, including “East Meets West in the Board Room and the Bedroom,” and “I Was Raised by a Tiger Mom and All I Got Was this Lousy T-Shirt: A Rebuttal to Chua.” Through personal anecdotes and tough-love advice, Keltner’s witty and forthright opinions evoke an Asian-American Sex and the City, while showing how our families shape our personal worlds.

Tiger Babies Strike Back

Author: Kim Wong Keltner

Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780062229298

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 5823


An answer to Amy Chua’s Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, author Kim Wong Keltner’s Tiger Babies Strike Back takes the control-freak beast by the tail with a humorous and honest look at the issues facing women today—Chinese-American and otherwise. Keltner, the author of the novels Buddha Baby and I Want Candy, mines her own past in an attempt to dispel the myth that all Chinese women are Tiger Mothers. Keltner strikes back at Chua’s argument through topics, including “East Meets West in the Board Room and the Bedroom,” and “I Was Raised by a Tiger Mom and All I Got Was this Lousy T-Shirt: A Rebuttal to Chua.” Through personal anecdotes and tough-love advice, Keltner’s witty and forthright opinions evoke an Asian-American Sex and the City, while showing how our families shape our personal worlds.