Berserk Style in American Culture

Author: K. Farrell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 023033914X

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 4953


Focusing on post-Vietnam America, using perspectives from psychology, anthropology, and physiology, this book demonstrates the need for criticism to unpack the confusions in language and cultural fantasy that drive the nation's fascination with the berserk style.

The Psychology of Abandon

Author: Kirby Farrell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781937146726

Category: American literature

Page: 250

View: 5177


When behavior becomes a cultural style, berserk abandon is terrifying yet also alluring. It promises access to extraordinary resources by overthrowing inhibitions. Berserk style has shaped many areas of contemporary American culture, from warfare to politics and intimate life. Focusing on post-Vietnam America and using perspectives from psychology, anthropology, and physiology, Farrell demonstrates the need to unpack the confusions in language and cultural fantasy that drive the nation's fascination with berserk style.

Berserk Style in American Culture

Author: K. Farrell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 023033914X

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 5066


Focusing on post-Vietnam America, using perspectives from psychology, anthropology, and physiology, this book demonstrates the need for criticism to unpack the confusions in language and cultural fantasy that drive the nation's fascination with the berserk style.

Bad

Author: Murray Pomerance

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791485811

Category: Social Science

Page: 375

View: 9759


Examines the many forms of cinematic "badness" over the past one hundred years, from Nosferatu to The Talented Mr. Ripley.

The Psychology of Abandon

Author: Kirby Farrell

Publisher: Levellers Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Psychology

Page: 225

View: 7400


When behavior becomes a cultural style, berserk abandon is terrifying yet also alluring. It promises access to extraordinary resources by overthrowing inhibitions. Berserk style has shaped many areas of contemporary American culture, from warfare to politics and intimate life. Focusing on post-Vietnam America and using perspectives from psychology, anthropology, and physiology, Farrell demonstrates the need to unpack the confusions in language and cultural fantasy that drive the nation’s fascination with berserk style. “This book amazes me with its audacity, its clarity, and its scope. We usually think of ‘berserk’ behaviors—from apocalyptic rampage killings to ecstatic revels like Burning Man—as extremes of experience, outside ordinary lives. With rich evidence and fascinating detail, Farrell shows how contemporary culture has re-framed many varieties of the berserk into self-conscious strategies of sense-making and control. Beyond real but remote actions of the intoxicated or deranged, ‘berserk style’ has become a common lens for organizing modern experience and an often-troubling resource for mobilizing and rationalizing cultural and political action. This landmark analysis both enlightens and empowers us.” —Les Gasser, Professor of Information and Computer Science, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign “Drawing from a storehouse of cinema, news stories, ads, cartoons, literature, and lyrics from the post-Vietnam era, Farrell has painted a masterful, disturbing portrait of the American subconscious.” —James Aho, author of Sociological Trespasses “Farrell has undertaken yet another fascinating journey. He explores phenomena such as Columbine, Mike Tyson, ‘Going Postal,’ and Wall Street excesses to reveal an underlying style of thinking that is pervasive in American culture. As always, he is a provocative and highly readable cultural critic.” —Don Dutton, Professor of Psychology, University of British Columbia

Washed in Blood

Author: Claire Sisco King

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813552060

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 1611


Will Smith in I Am Legend. Leonardo DiCaprio in Titanic. Charlton Heston in just about everything. Viewers of Hollywood action films are no doubt familiar with the sacrificial victim-hero, the male protagonist who nobly gives up his life so that others may be saved. Washed in Blood argues that such sacrificial films are especially prominent in eras when the nation—and American manhood—is thought to be in crisis. The sacrificial victim-hero, continually imperiled and frequently exhibiting classic symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, thus bears the trauma of the nation. Claire Sisco King offers an in-depth study of three prominent cycles of Hollywood films that follow the sacrificial narrative: the early–to–mid 1970s, the mid–to–late 1990s, and the mid–to–late 2000s. From Vietnam-era disaster movies to post-9/11 apocalyptic thrillers, she examines how each film represents traumatized American masculinity and national identity. What she uncovers is a cinematic tendency to position straight white men as America’s most valuable citizens—and its noblest victims.

Interdisciplinary Handbook of Trauma and Culture

Author: Yochai Ataria,David Gurevitz,Haviva Pedaya,Yuval Neria

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319294040

Category: Psychology

Page: 399

View: 614


This lofty volume analyzes a circular cultural relationship: not only how trauma is reflected in cultural processes and products, but also how trauma itself acts as a critical shaper of literature, the visual and performing arts, architecture, and religion and mythmaking. The political power of trauma is seen through US, Israeli, and Japanese art forms as they reflect varied roles of perpetrator, victim, and witness. Traumatic complexities are traced from spirituality to movement, philosophy to trauma theory. And essays on authors such as Kafka, Plath, and Cormac McCarthy examine how narrative can blur the boundaries of personal and collective experience. Among the topics covered: Television: a traumatic culture. From Hiroshima to Fukushima: comics and animation as subversive agents of memory in Japan. The death of the witness in the era of testimony: Primo Levi and Georges Perec. Sigmund Freud’s Moses and Monotheism and the possibility of writing a traumatic history of religion. Placing collective trauma within its social context: the case of the 9/11 attacks. Killing the killer: rampage and gun rights as a syndrome. This volume appeals to multiple readerships including researchers and clinicians, sociologists, anthropologists, historians, and media researchers.

Native Americans on Network TV

Author: Michael Ray FitzGerald

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442229624

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 278

View: 1022


This book argues that the US is a great colonial power and that this is clearly evident in network television’s treatment of minorities and colonized peoples. This book argues that televised representations of Native Americans fit neatly into what would be called ‘colonial discourse.’

Prison Cultures

Author: Aylwyn Walsh

Publisher: Intellect Books

ISBN: 1789381061

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 1828


Prison Cultures offers the first systematic examination of women in prison and performances in and of the institution. Using a feminist approach to reach beyond tropes of 'bad girls' and simplistic inside vs. outside dynamics, it examines how cultural products can perpetuate or disrupt hegemonic understandings of the world of prisons. The book identifies how and why prison functions as a fixed field and postulates new ways of viewing performances in and of prison that trouble the institution, with a primary focus on the United Kingdom and examples from popular culture. A new contribution to the fields of feminist cultural criticism and prison studies, Aylwyn Walsh explores how the development of a theory of resistance and desire is central to the understanding of women’s incarceration. It problematizes the prevalence of purely literary analysis or case studies that proffer particular models of arts practice as transformative of offending behaviour.

Arnold

Author: Dave Saunders

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 0857710540

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 8089


"Arnold: Schwarzenegger and the Movies" is the first comprehensive, in-depth book to examine one of modern cinema's most celebrated and divisive screen presences. Tracing Schwarzenegger's entire film career and life from teenage bodybuilder to Governor of California, Saunders blends close textual readings of the major films, including "Pumping Iron", "Conan the Barbarian", The "Terminator" series, "Twins" and "True Lies", with salient historical context and biographical detail, demonstrating continually the importance of broader social and political factors in defining Arnold's unique significance. Representing far more than just a muscular spectacle, Saunders argues, Schwarzenegger found powerful ideological and spiritual relevance to his age by embarking on a quest to restore collective faith in his adopted nation - and, moreover, by exploiting his own, mythic importance to a post-war America struggling to come to terms with its own contemporary narrative.