Contesting the Middle Ages

Author: John Aberth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317496094

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 7222


Contesting the Middle Ages is a thorough exploration of recent arguments surrounding nine hotly debated topics: the decline and fall of Rome, the Viking invasions, the Crusades, the persecution of minorities, sexuality in the Middle Ages, women within medieval society, intellectual and environmental history, the Black Death, and, lastly, the waning of the Middle Ages. The historiography of the Middle Ages, a term in itself controversial amongst medieval historians, has been continuously debated and rewritten for centuries. In each chapter, John Aberth sets out key historiographical debates in an engaging and informative way, encouraging students to consider the process of writing about history and prompting them to ask questions even of already thoroughly debated subjects, such as why the Roman Empire fell, or what significance the Black Death had both in the late Middle Ages and beyond. Sparking discussion and inspiring examination of the past and its ongoing significance in modern life, Contesting the Middle Ages is essential reading for students of medieval history and historiography.

Contesting the Crusades

Author: Norman Housley

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781405111898

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 4739


In this book Norman Housley, one of the most distinguished historians of the medieval period, provides an introduction to the complex history of crusading. Steers readers through the key debates in this popular area of medieval history. Draws on the author’s 30 years’ experience of crusading scholarship. Issues addressed range from the definition of ‘crusade’, through the motivation and intentions of the crusaders, to the consequences of the crusades for European society

Contesting the City

Author: Christian D. Liddy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198705204

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 3528


The political narrative of late medieval English towns is often reduced to the story of the gradual intensification of oligarchy, in which power was exercised and projected by an ever smaller ruling group over an increasingly subservient urban population. Contesting the City takes its inspiration not from English historiography, but from a more dynamic continental scholarship on towns in the southern Low Countries, Germany, and France. Its premise is that scholarly debate about urban oligarchy has obscured contemporary debate about urban citizenship. It identifies from the records of English towns a tradition of urban citizenship, which did not draw upon the intellectual legacy of classical models of the 'citizen'. This was a vernacular citizenship, which was not peculiar to England, but which was present elsewhere in late medieval Europe. It was a citizenship that was defined and created through action. There were multiple, and divergent, ideas about citizenship, which encouraged townspeople to make demands, to assert rights, and to resist authority. This volume exploits the rich archival sources of the five major towns in England - Bristol, Coventry, London, Norwich, and York - in order to present a new picture of town government and urban politics over three centuries. The power of urban governors was much more precarious than historians have imagined. Urban oligarchy could never prevail - whether ideologically or in practice - when there was never a single, fixed meaning of the citizen.

Balaam's Ass: Vernacular Theology Before the English Reformation

Author: Nicholas Watson

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812298349

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 640

View: 9590


Balaam's Ass attempts the first comprehensive overview of religious writing in early England's vernacular languages--Old English, Insular French, and Middle English--between the ninth and sixteenth centuries. In this first of three volumes, Watson focuses on the first generation of these writings, in Old English and early Middle English.

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

Author: Roland Greene,Stephen Cushman,Clare Cavanagh,Jahan Ramazani,Paul Rouzer,Harris Feinsod,David Marno,Alexandra Slessarev

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691154910

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1639

View: 1772


Rev. ed. of: The Princeton encyclopedia of poetry and poetics / Alex Preminger and T.V.F. Brogan, co-editors; Frank J. Warnke, O.B. Hardison, Jr., and Earl Miner, associate editors. 1993.

Contesting Inter-Religious Conversion in the Medieval World

Author: Yaniv Fox,Yosi Yisraeli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317160266

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 2935


The Mediterranean and its hinterlands were the scene of intensive and transformative contact between cultures in the Middle Ages. From the seventh to the seventeenth century, the three civilizations into which the region came to be divided geographically – the Islamic Khalifate, the Byzantine Empire, and the Latin West – were busily redefining themselves vis-à-vis one another. Interspersed throughout the region were communities of minorities, such as Christians in Muslim lands, Muslims in Christian lands, heterodoxical sects, pagans, and, of course, Jews. One of the most potent vectors of interaction and influence between these communities in the medieval world was inter-religious conversion: the process whereby groups or individuals formally embraced a new religion. The chapters of this book explore this dynamic: what did it mean to convert to Christianity in seventh-century Ireland? What did it mean to embrace Islam in tenth-century Egypt? Are the two phenomena comparable on a social, cultural, and legal level? The chapters of the book also ask what we are able to learn from our sources, which, at times, provide a very culturally-charged and specific conversion rhetoric. Taken as a whole, the compositions in this volume set out to argue that inter-religious conversion was a process that was recognizable and comparable throughout its geographical and chronological purview.

Taming Oblivion

Author: John W. Traphagan

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791444993

Category: Social Science

Page: 225

View: 2694


Examines the cultural construction of senility in Japan and the moral implications of dependent behavior for older Japanese.

Contesting the Renaissance

Author: William Caferro

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444391329

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 8535


In this book, William Caferro asks if the Renaissance was really a period of progress, reason, the emergence of the individual, and the beginning of modernity. An influential investigation into the nature of the European Renaissance Summarizes scholarly debates about the nature of the Renaissance Engages with specific controversies concerning gender identity, economics, the emergence of the modern state, and reason and faith Takes a balanced approach to the many different problems and perspectives that characterize Renaissance studies

Death in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times

Author: Albrecht Classen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110436973

Category: Social Science

Page: 551

View: 8296


Death is not only the final moment of life, it also casts a huge shadow on human society at large. People throughout time have had to cope with death as an existential experience, and this also, of course, in the premodern world. The contributors to the present volume examine the material and spiritual conditions of the culture of death, studying specific buildings and spaces, literary works and art objects, theatrical performances, and medical tracts from the early Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century. Death has always evoked fear, terror, and awe, it has puzzled and troubled people, forcing theologians and philosophers to respond and provide answers for questions that seem to evade real explanations. The more we learn about the culture of death, the more we can comprehend the culture of life. As this volume demonstrates, the approaches to death varied widely, also in the Middle Ages and the early modern age. This volume hence adds a significant number of new facets to the critical examination of this ever-present phenomenon of death, exploring poetic responses to the Black Death, types of execution of a female murderess, death as the springboard for major political changes, and death reflected in morality plays and art.

Contesting the City

Author: Christian D. Liddy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019101527X

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5549


The political narrative of late medieval English towns is often reduced to the story of the gradual intensification of oligarchy, in which power was exercised and projected by an ever smaller ruling group over an increasingly subservient urban population. Contesting the City takes its inspiration not from English historiography, but from a more dynamic continental scholarship on towns in the southern Low Countries, Germany, and France. Its premise is that scholarly debate about urban oligarchy has obscured contemporary debate about urban citizenship. It identifies from the records of English towns a tradition of urban citizenship, which did not draw upon the intellectual legacy of classical models of the 'citizen'. This was a vernacular citizenship, which was not peculiar to England, but which was present elsewhere in late medieval Europe. It was a citizenship that was defined and created through action. There were multiple, and divergent, ideas about citizenship, which encouraged townspeople to make demands, to assert rights, and to resist authority. This volume exploits the rich archival sources of the five major towns in England - Bristol, Coventry, London, Norwich, and York - in order to present a new picture of town government and urban politics over three centuries. The power of urban governors was much more precarious than historians have imagined. Urban oligarchy could never prevail - whether ideologically or in practice - when there was never a single, fixed meaning of the citizen.