Fear of Crime and Perceived Risk: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Author: Oxford University Press

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199803385

Category: Social Science

Page: 20

View: 1548


This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of criminology find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In criminology, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Criminology, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study and practice of criminology. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.

Perceptions of Community Crime in Ferguson, MO

Author: Kandace L. Fisher-McLean

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319467867

Category: Social Science

Page: 135

View: 8490


This Brief is based on a research study of aging adults' perceptions and fear of crime in their community of Ferguson, Missouri. The study, which was conducted by coincidence just prior to the death of Michael Brown, presents unique insights into the community environment prior to those events, which sparked protests and turmoil in Ferguson and beyond. This qualitative study employs sampling and semi-structured interviews to survey older adults aging in place in Ferguson about their perceptions of crime, social disorder, racial integration and community transformation. The author also draws comparisons to other US cities, and recommendations for future research. While the study is only preliminary, it will be of interest to anyone researching the intersection of race, crime, and community, or particularly the protests surrounding the events in Ferguson, Missouri, as a starting point for comparison.

Perceptions of Criminal Justice

Author: Vicky De Mesmaecker

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134618611

Category: Social Science

Page: 170

View: 8696


In recent decades, research into the legitimacy of criminal justice has convincingly demonstrated the importance of procedural justice to citizens’ sense of trust and confidence in legal authorities and their resulting willingness to conform to the law and cooperate with the legal authorities. Reversing the age-old question ‘why do people break the law?’, theories of procedural justice have provided insight into the factors that encourage people to abide by the law, suggesting that experiences of procedural fairness are crucial to achieving compliance with the law and to enhancing the legitimacy of criminal justice. While these studies are important in showing that legal authorities need to pay attention to the fairness judgements of the people involved in legal procedures, the focus on showing the importance of procedural justice has had the ironic consequence of distracting researchers from studying the equally important question of what fairness means to the people involved in legal proceedings. In one of the first studies on procedural justice to use a qualitative research design, the author provides the reader with detailed and insightful descriptions of the elements that determine how victims and defendants assess the fairness of their contact with the police and the courts. Focusing on both the pre-trial and the post-trial phases, this book will be of interest to academics and students engaged in the study of the psychology of law, procedural justice and the legitimacy of criminal justice.