Deviant

Author: Harold Schechter

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439106976

Category: True Crime

Page: 256

View: 9464


The truth behind the twisted crimes that inspired the films Psycho, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, and The Silence of the Lambs... From “America’s principal chronicler of its greatest psychopathic killers” (The Boston Book Review) comes the definitive account of Ed Gein, a mild-mannered Wisconsin farmhand who stunned an unsuspecting nation—and redefined the meaning of the word “psycho.” The year was 1957. The place was an ordinary farmhouse in America’s heartland, filled with extraordinary evidence of unthinkable depravity. The man behind the massacre was a slight, unassuming Midwesterner with a strange smile—and even stranger attachment to his domineering mother. After her death and a failed attempt to dig up his mother’s body from the local cemetery, Gein turned to other grave robberies and, ultimately, multiple murders. Driven to commit gruesome and bizarre acts beyond all imagining, Ed Gein remains one of the most deranged minds in the annals of American homicide. This is his story—recounted in fascinating and chilling detail by Harold Schechter, one of the most acclaimed true-crime storytellers of our time.

Summary and Analysis of Deviant: The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original Psycho

Author: Worth Books

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1504044908

Category: True Crime

Page: 30

View: 2209


So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of Deviant: The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original “Psycho” tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Harold Schechter’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of Deviant includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter overviews Profiles of the main characters Detailed timeline of key events Important quotes and analysis Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About Deviant: The Shocking True Story of Ed Gein, the Original “Psycho” by Harold Schechter: This true-crime classic profiles Ed Gein, the murderer and grave robber whose crimes inspired the films Psycho, The Silence of the Lambs, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Ed Gein was a mildmannered midwestern farmhand—until his horrific crimes were uncovered. After a failed attempt to dig up the grave of his dead mother, Gein became a grave robber and then a murderer. What he did with the bodies of his victims was disturbing and gory beyond all imagination, and it leaves no doubt about what Ed Gein really was: the original psycho. The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.

Murder Movie Makers

Author: Matthew Edwards

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476639663

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 216

View: 880


Serial killers, mass murderers, spree killers, outlaws, and real-life homicidal maniacs have long held a grim fascination for both filmmakers and viewers. Since the 1970s, hundreds of films and television movies have been made covering killers from Charles Manson to Ted Bundy and the Zodiac Killer creating a uniquely morbid sub-genre within horror and thrillers. This collection of interviews sheds light on 17 filmmakers and screenwriters who tackled this controversial subject while attempting to explore the warped world of infamous killers. The interviews include John McNaughton (Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer), Tom Hanson (The Zodiac Killer), David Wickes (Jack the Ripper), Chris Gerolmo (Citizen X), Chuck Parello (The Hillside Stranglers), David Jacobson (Dahmer) and Clive Saunders on his ill-fated experience directing Gacy. Offering candid insights into the creative process behind these movies, the interviews also show the pitfalls and moral controversy the filmmakers had to wrestle with to bring their visions to the screen.

The Rise of True Crime: 20th-Century Murder and American Popular Culture

Author: Jean Murley

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1573567728

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 655


During the 1950s and 1960s True Detective magazine developed a new way of narrating and understanding murder. It was more sensitive to context, gave more psychologically sophisticated accounts, and was more willing to make conjectures about the unknown thoughts and motivations of killers than others had been before. This turned out to be the start of a revolution, and, after a century of escalating accounts, we have now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. The Rise of True Crime examines the various genres of true crime using the most popular and well-known examples. And despite its examination of some of the potentially negative effects of the genre, it is written for people who read and enjoy true crime, and wish to learn more about it. With skyrocketing crime rates and the appearance of a frightening trend toward social chaos in the 1970s, books, documentaries, and fiction films in the true crime genre tried to make sense of the Charles Manson crimes and the Gary Gilmore execution events. And in the 1980s and 1990s, true crime taught pop culture consumers about forensics, profiling, and highly technical aspects of criminology. We have thus now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. Through the suggestion that certain kinds of killers are monstrous or outside the realm of human morality, and through the perpetuation of the stranger-danger idea, the true crime aesthetic has both responded to and fostered our culture's fears. True crime is also the site of a dramatic confrontation with the concept of evil, and one of the few places in American public discourse where moral terms are used without any irony, and notions and definitions of evil are presented without ambiguity. When seen within its historical context, true crime emerges as a vibrant and meaningful strand of popular culture, one that is unfortunately devalued as lurid and meaningless pulp.

The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia

Author: Stephen Whitty

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442251603

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 548

View: 5717


Several decades after his last motion picture was produced, Alfred Hitchcock is still regarded by critics and fans alike as one of the masters of cinema. From silents of the 1920s to his final feature in 1976, the director’s many films continue to entertain audiences and inspire filmmakers. In The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia, film critic Stephen Whitty provides a detailed overview of the director's work. This reference volume features in-depth critical entries on each of his major films as well as biographical essays on his most frequent collaborators and discussions of significant themes in his work. For this book, Whitty draws on primary-source materials such as interviews he conducted with associates of the director—including screenwriter Jay Presson Allen (Marnie), actresses Eva Marie Saint (North by Northwest) and Kim Novak (Vertigo), actor Farley Granger (Strangers on a Train), actor and producer Norman Lloyd (Saboteur), and Hitchcock’s daughter Patricia (Stage Fright; Psycho)—among others. Encompassing the entire range of the director’s career—from early influences and silent films to his decade-long television show and cameos in nearly every feature—this is a comprehensive overview of cinema’s ultimate showman. A detailed and lively look at the master of suspense, The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia will be of interest to professors, students, and the many fans of the director’s work.

Booktalking Nonfiction

Author: Jennifer Bromann-Bender

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810888092

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 168

View: 5392


Booktalking Nonfiction: 200 Surefire Winners for Middle and High School Readers will provide an introduction to selecting and writing booktalks for nonfiction books with a focus on unique informational texts and biographies and autobiographies. The Common Core Standards Initiative, which most states have adopted, requires that 70% of the materials students read be from the category of informational texts it is especially important to focus on nonfiction when sharing books with students. Bromann-Bender provides everything you need to do just that.

The Mad Sculptor

Author: Harold Schechter

Publisher: Head of Zeus

ISBN: 1781853088

Category: True Crime

Page: 304

View: 1130


An unputdownable true crime story set in the pulp-fiction obsessed world of 1930s America. On Easter Sunday 1937, Bob Irwin – a handsome, failing sculptor with a history of depression and psychopathic episodes – commited a grisly triple murder. Creeping back to the flat of his ex-landlady in a swish New York borough, Irwin killed her, her lodger, and her stunning daughter Ronnie with an ice-pick, an apparently motiveless homicide that would shock the entire country. Firmly in 'you couldn't make it up' territory, and crafted like a Chandler novel, THE MAD SCULPTOR thrillingly relates Irwin's crime, flight, and capture, his trial and its aftermath, whilst painting a warts-and-all portrait of 1930s America.

Crimes of the Centuries: Notorious Crimes, Criminals, and Criminal Trials in American History [3 volumes]

Author: Steven Chermak Ph.D.,Frankie Y. Bailey Ph.D.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610695941

Category: True Crime

Page: 1080

View: 4595


This multivolume resource is the most extensive reference of its kind, offering a comprehensive summary of the misdeeds, perpetrators, and victims involved in the most memorable crime events in American history. • Supports national standards curriculum • Offers an extensive selection of primary documents to encourage critical thinking and reading practice • Includes photos and illustrations to help bring content to life • Features sidebars with illuminating crime facts and interesting anecdotes

The Psycho File

Author: Joseph W. Smith III

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786454865

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 226

View: 1056


An examination of the groundbreaking 1960 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, including the story's origins in real-life graverobber Ed Gein. The book presents material from the script and how it was adapted from Robert Bloch's novel; details of the film's production, particularly the shower scene and other technical difficulties; actors and the challenges of their roles; extended literary analysis of the film covering such devices as irony, symbol, theme, motif and foil; and the film's effect on audiences. Features 16 photographs, notes, bibliography and index.