Dispatches from the Dating Front Lines

Author: Cindy Chupack

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1429958502

Category: Humor

Page: 32

View: 2948


Cindy Chupack takes a hilarious look at love, dating, and not dating in this witty, truthful and utterly charming book. Tackling topics such as "relationship reruns" (a sobering stage when you realize that the men you meet are basically repeats of the men you've already dated) and "relocationships" (the kind of relationship hat necessitates moving to a place where you would never consider living), Dispatches from the Dating Front Lines is as reassuring as that late-night post-date phone call to a best friend. It says: you may be single, but you are not alone. Praise for The Between Boyfriends Book: A Collection of Cautiously Hopeful Essays "Oh, how I love this book! I laughed out loud again and again. It hits such an intimate and true chord, it's painful actually, how insightful Cindy Chupack is. Every woman who's been through the dating miasma must read it." - Julia Sweeney "Cindy Chupack is funny about single. Very funny. And smart. And sympathetic. And empathetic. And helpful. And the stories in this book are really horrible in a great way." - Delia Ephron

Letters and Dispatches

Author: Strafford

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3619


Dispatches from a Not-So-Perfect Life

Author: Faulkner Fox

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0307420582

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 1120


When Salon.com published Faulkner Fox’s article on motherhood, “What I Learned from Losing My Mind,” the response was so overwhelming that Salon reran the piece twice. The experience made Faulkner realize that she was not alone—that the country is full of women who are anxious and conflicted about their roles as mothers and wives. In Dispatches from a Not-So-Perfect Life, her provocative, brutally honest, and often hilarious memoir of motherhood, Faulkner explores the causes of her unhappiness, as well as the societal and cultural forces that American mothers have to contend with. From the time of her first pregnancy, Faulkner found herself—and her body—scrutinized by doctors, friends, strangers, and, perhaps most of all, herself. In addition to the significant social pressures of raising the perfect child and being the perfect mom, Faulkner also found herself increasingly incensed by the unequal distribution of household labor and infuriated by the gender inequity in both her home and others’. And though she loves her children and her husband passionately, is thankful for her bountiful middle-class life, and feels wracked with guilt for being unhappy, she just can’t seem to experience the sense of satisfaction that she thought would come with the package. She’s finally got it all—the husband, the house, the kids, an interesting part-time job, even a few hours a week to write—so why does she feel so conflicted? Faulkner sheds light on the fear, confusion, and isolation experienced by many new mothers, mapping the terrain of contemporary domesticity, marriage, and motherhood in a voice that is candid, irreverent, and deeply personal, while always chronicling the unparalleled joy she and other mothers take in their children.