Falling Towards England

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330474316

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 176

View: 5183


In the first volume of Clive James's autobiography, Unreliable Memoirs, we said farewell to our hero as he set sail from Sydney Harbour, bound for London, fame and fortune. Finding the first of these proved relatively simple; the second two less so. Undaunted, Clive moved into a bed and breakfast in a Swiss Cottage where he practised the Twist, anticipated poetical masterpieces and worried about his wardrobe . . . Falling Towards England is the entertaining and erudite second part in Clive James' life story, which he continues in May Week Was in June, North Face of Soho and The Blaze of Obscurity.

The Complete Unreliable Memoirs

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1529015111

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: N.A

View: 4914


The Complete Unreliable Memoirs features all five volumes of Clive James's memoirs in one ebook omnibus. Including Unreliable Memoirs, Falling Towards England, May Week was in June, North Face of Soho and The Blaze of Obscurity. Unreliable Memoirs: In the first instalment of Clive James’s memoirs, we meet the young Clive, dressed in short trousers, and wrestling with the demands of school, various relatives and the occasional snake, in the suburbs of post-war Sydney. His adventures are hilarious, his recounting of them even more so, in this – the book that started it all . . . Falling Towards England: When we last met our hero in Unreliable Memoirs, he had set sail from Sydney Harbour bound for London, fame and fortune. Having arrived, he finds fame and fortune initially difficult to achieve. May Week was in June: In ‘Unreliable Memoirs III’, Clive details his time at Cambridge, including film reviewing, writing poetry, falling in love (often), and marrying (once) during May Week – which was not only in June but also two weeks long . . . North Face of Soho: Taking us from Fleet Street to Clive James on TV, from Russian department stores to Paris fashion shows — via fatherhood, some killer bees, and a satire starring Anne Robinson as Mrs Thatcher — North Face of Soho is the larger-than-life story of a life lived to the full. The Blaze of Obscurity: Perhaps his most brilliant book yet, The Blaze of Obscurity tells the inside story of his years in television, it shows Clive James on top form – both then and now.

Always Unreliable

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330526723

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 560

View: 2663


Always Unreliable is the collected first three volumes of Clive James's eloquently witty autobiographies, Unreliable Memoirs, Falling Towards England and May Week Was in June. In Unreliable Memoirs we meet the young Clive James – dressed in shorts and growing up in post-war Sydney. With Falling Towards England, we find Clive living in a Swiss Cottage B&B, where he practises the Twist, anticipates poetical masterpieces he’s yet to compose, and worries about his wardrobe. Finally, May Week Was In June sees Clive at Cambridge University, where he enthusiastically involves himself in college life (generally female lives) until May Week – not only in June but also a fortnight long – when he gets married. The rest, of course, is history . . .

North Face of Soho

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330474375

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 9836


In the closing pages of the last volume, I got married. The ceremony marked a rare outbreak of normality in my life. It was symbolized by my personal appearance. I was clean-shaven and had a hairstyle in reasonably close touch with my head. After Unreliable Memoirs, Falling Towards England and May Week Was In June comes the fourth instalment in Clive James’s life. Taking us from Fleet Street to Clive James on TV, from Russian department stores to Paris fashion shows – via fatherhood, some killer bees, and a satire starring Anne Robinson as Mrs Thatcher – North Face of Soho is the larger-than-life story of a life lived to the full. Continue Clive's story with the last of his memoirs The Blaze of Obscurity.

May Week Was In June

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330474340

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 5006


Arriving in Cambridge on my first day as an undergraduate, I could see nothing except a cold white October mist. At the age of twenty-four I was a complete failure, with nothing to show for my life except a few poems nobody wanted to publish in book form.’ Falling Towards England – the second volume of Clive James’s Unreliable Memoirs – was meant to be the last. Thankfully, that's not the case. In ‘Unreliable Memoirs III’, May Week Was in June, Clive details his time at Cambridge, including film reviewing, writing poetry, falling in love (often), and marrying (once) during May Week – which was not only in June but also two weeks long . . . Continue Clive's story with even more of his memoirs: North Face of Soho and The Blaze of Obscurity.

The Blaze of Obscurity

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 033051525X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 8652


I was never alone except in the toilet, where I soon found that locking myself into a cubicle was not much protection from hearing myself talked about by young men standing at urinals. (“Jesus, he’s looking rough.” “And it’s only Monday.”) Reviews for Clive James’s fourth volume of memoirs, North Face of Soho, included several that specifically requested a further volume; Clive James duly obliged and here, in all its glory, is ‘Unreliable Memoirs V’, otherwise known as The Blaze of Obscurity. Perhaps his most brilliant memoir, The Blaze of Obscurity tells the inside story of his years in television: it shows Clive James on top form. ‘In the case of many people who attempt an autobiography even a single volume is one too many . . . In the case of Clive James, the volumes now in existence are too few. If the final tally puts him up there with Marcel Proust, so much the better.’ – Financial Times.

The Fire of Joy

Author: Clive James

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1529042097

Category: Poetry

Page: N.A

View: 9021


Clive James read, learned and recited poetry aloud for most of his life. In this book, completed before just before his death, he offers a selection of his favourite poems and a personal commentary on each. In the last months of his life, his vision impaired by surgery and unable to read, Clive James explored the treasure-house of his mind: the poems he knew best, so good that he didn’t just remember them, he found them impossible to forget. The Fire of Joy is the record of this final journey of recollection and celebration. Enthralled by poetry all his life, James knew hundreds of poems by heart. In offering this selection of his favourites, a succession of poems from the sixteenth century to the present, his aim is to inspire you to discover and to learn, and perhaps even to speak poetry aloud. In his highly personal anthology, James offers a commentary on each of the eighty or so poems: sometimes a historical or critical note on the poem or its author, sometimes a technical point about the poem’s construction from someone who was himself a poet, sometimes a personal anecdote about the role the poem played in his own life. Whether you’re familiar with a poem or not — whether you’re familiar with poetry in general or not — these chatty, unpretentious, often tender mini-essays convey the joy of James’s enthusiasm and the benefit of his knowledge. His urgent wish was to share with a new generation what he himself had loved. This is a book to be read cover to cover or dipped into: either way it generously opens up a world for our delight.