Family of Secrets

Author: Russ Baker

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608191923

Category: Political Science

Page: 592

View: 7479


"Shocking in its disclosures, elegantly crafted, and faultlessly measured in its judgments."-Roger Morris, author of Richard Milhous Nixon and Partners in Power How did the deeply flawed George W. Bush ascend to the highest office in the nation, what forces abetted his rise, and-perhaps most important-were those forces really vanquished by Obama's election? Award-winning investigative journalist Russ Baker gives us the answers in Family of Secrets, a compelling and startling new take on the Bush dynasty and the shadowy elite that has quietly steered the American republic for the past half century and more. Baker shows how this network of figures in intelligence, the military, oil, and finance enabled-and in turn benefited handsomely from-the Bushes' perch at the highest levels of government. As Baker reveals, this deeply entrenched elite remains in power regardless of who sits in the Oval Office. Family of Secrets offers countless disclosures that challenge the conventional accounts of such central events as the JFK assassination and Watergate. It includes an inside account of George W.'s cynical religious conversion and the untold real background to the disastrous response to Hurricane Katrina. Baker's narrative is gripping, sobering, and deeply sourced. It will change the way we understand not just the Bush years, but a half century of postwar history-and the present.

Oil, Power, and War

Author: Matthieu Auzanneau

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 1603587446

Category: History

Page: 672

View: 5517


"Auzanneau has created a towering telling of a dark and dangerous addiction.”—Nature In this sweeping, unabashed history of oil, Matthieu Auzanneau takes a fresh, thought-provoking look at the way oil interests have commandeered politics and economies, changed cultures, disrupted power balances across the globe, and spawned wars. He upends commonly held assumptions about key political and financial events of the past 150 years, and he sheds light on what our oil-constrained and eventually post-oil future might look like. Oil, Power, and War follows the oil industry from its heyday when the first oil wells were drilled to the quest for new sources as old ones dried up. It traces the rise of the Seven Sisters and other oil cartels and exposes oil’s key role in the crises that have shaped our times: two world wars, the Cold War, the Great Depression, Bretton Woods, the 2008 financial crash, oil shocks, wars in the Middle East, the race for Africa’s oil riches, and more. And it defines the oil-born trends shaping our current moment, such as the jockeying for access to Russia’s vast oil resources, the search for extreme substitutes for declining conventional oil, the rise of terrorism, and the changing nature of economic growth. We meet a long line of characters from John D. Rockefeller to Dick Cheney and Rex Tillerson, and hear lesser-known stories like how New York City taxes were once funneled directly to banks run by oil barons. We see how oil and power, once they became inextricably linked, drove actions of major figures like Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, Hitler, Kissinger, and the Bushes. We also learn the fascinating backstory sparked by lesser-known but key personalities such as Calouste Gulbenkian, Abdullah al-Tariki, and Marion King Hubbert, the once-silenced oil industry expert who warned his colleagues that oil production was facing its peak. Oil, Power, and War is a story of the dreams and hubris that spawned an era of economic chaos, climate change, war, and terrorism—as well as an eloquent framing from which to consider our options as our primary source of power, in many ways irreplaceable, grows ever more constrained. Oil, Power, and War was originally published in France as Or Noir. It was translated from the original French by John F. Reynolds and published in collaboration with the Post Carbon Institute. PCI generously funded the translation and helped bring the entire project to fruition, including the foreword by Richard Heinberg and a technical review.

Family Secrets

Author: Deborah Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199985634

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 8296


We live today in a culture of full disclosure, where tell-all memoirs top the best-seller lists, transparency is lauded, and privacy seems imperiled. But how did we get here? Exploring scores of previously sealed records, Family Secrets offers a sweeping account of how shame--and the relationship between secrecy and openness--has changed over the last two centuries in Britain. Deborah Cohen uses detailed sketches of individual families as the basis for comparing different sorts of social stigma. She takes readers inside an Edinburgh town house, where a genteel maiden frets with her brother over their niece's downy upper lip, a darkening shadow that might betray the girl's Eurasian heritage; to a Liverpool railway platform, where a heartbroken mother hands over her eight-year old illegitimate son for adoption; to a town in the Cotswolds, where a queer vicar brings to his bank vault a diary--sewed up in calico, wrapped in parchment--that chronicles his sexual longings. Cohen explores what families in the past chose to keep secret and why. She excavates the tangled history of privacy and secrecy to explain why privacy is now viewed as a hallowed right while secrets are condemned as destructive. In delving into the dynamics of shame and guilt, Family Secrets explores the part that families, so often regarded as the agents of repression, have played in the transformation of social mores from the Victorian era to the present day. Written with compassion and keen insight, this is a bold new argument about the sea-changes that took place behind closed doors.

Bush

Author: Jean Edward Smith

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476741204

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 832

View: 9613


A biography of George W. Bush, showing how he ignored his advisors to make key decisions himself--most in invading Iraq--and how these decisions were often driven by the President's deep religious faith.

He Was Expendable: National Security, Political and Bureaucratic Cover Ups In the Murder of President John F. Kennedy

Author: James Kelleher

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 1483416089

Category: History

Page: 509

View: 5843


The Warren Commission got it wrong when it concluded there was no conspiracy to assassinate President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. James Kelleher, a political scientist, proves it in this well-researched examination that uncovers: • evidence showing a shot came from the grassy knoll • relationships between Oswald and numerous individuals never identified by the Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Warren Commission. • connections between Jack Ruby and gangsters linked to the Central Intelligence Agency’s failed attempts to kill Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro. Further evidence shows that President Lyndon B. Johnson helped squelch rumors about Soviet or Cuban involvement to avoid a conflict that could have led to nuclear war. Even the Secret Service destroyed evidence of credible attempts on the president’s life.

Family Secrets

Author: Deborah Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190673494

Category: History

Page: 389

View: 1983


"Exploring scores of previously sealed records, Family Secrets offers a sweeping account of how shame--and the relationship between secrecy and openness--has changed over the last two centuries in Britain. Deborah Cohen uses detailed sketches of individual families as the basis for comparing different sorts of social stigma. She takes readers inside an Edinburgh town house, where a genteel maiden frets with her brother over their niece's downy upper lip, a darkening shadow that might betray the girl's Eurasian heritage; to a Liverpool railway platform, where a heartbroken mother hands over her eight-year old illegitimate son for adoption; to a town in the Cotswolds, where a queer vicar brings to his bank vault a diary--sewed up in calico, wrapped in parchment--that chronicles his sexual longings. Cohen explores what families in the past chose to keep secret and why. She excavates the tangled history of privacy and secrecy to explain why privacy is now viewed as a hallowed right while secrets are condemned as destructive."--Provided by publisher.

Secrecy and Disclosure in Victorian Fiction

Author: Leila Silvana May

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317058429

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 242

View: 7933


Why were the Victorians more fascinated with secrecy than people of other periods? What is the function of secrets in Victorian fiction and in the society depicted, how does it differ from that of other periods, and how did readers of Victorian fiction respond to the secrecy they encountered? These are some of the questions Leila May poses in her study of the dynamics of secrecy and disclosure in fiction from Queen Victoria's coronation to the century's end. May argues that the works of writers such as Charlotte Brontë, William Makepeace Thackeray, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, and Arthur Conan Doyle reflect a distinctly Victorian obsession with the veiling and unveiling of information. She argues that there are two opposing vectors in Victorian culture concerning secrecy and subjectivity, one presupposing a form of radical Cartesian selfhood always remaining a secret to other selves and another showing that nothing can be hidden from the trained eye. (May calls the relation between these clashing tendencies the "dialectics" of secrecy and disclosure.) May's theories of secrecy and disclosure are informed by the work of twentieth-century social scientists. She emphasizes Georg Simmel's thesis that sociality and subjectivity are impossible without secrecy and Erving Goffman's claim that sociality can be understood in terms of performativity, "the presentation of the self in everyday life," and his revelation that performance always involves disguise, hence secrecy. May's study offers convincing evidence that secrecy and duplicity, in contrast to the Victorian period's emphasis on honesty and earnestness, emerged in response to the social pressures of class, gender, monarchy, and empire, and were key factors in producing both the subjectivity and the sociality that we now recognize as Victorian.

The Man Who Killed Kennedy

Author: Roger J. Stone,Mike Colapietro

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1632200406

Category: True Crime

Page: 433

View: 9886


This New York Times bestseller by the veteran government operative lays out the theory that LBJ orchestrated the JFK assassination. Consummate political insider Roger Stone makes a compelling case that Lyndon Baines Johnson had the motive, means, and opportunity to orchestrate the murder of John F. Kennedy. Stone maps out the case that Johnson blackmailed his way on the ticket in 1960 and was being dumped in 1964 to face prosecution for corruption at the hands of his nemesis attorney, Robert Kennedy. Stone uses fingerprint evidence and testimony to prove Kennedy was shot by a long-time Johnson hit man—not Lee Harvey Oswald. Johnson would use power from his personal connections in Texas, from the criminal underworld, and from the United States government to escape an untimely end in politics and to seize even greater power. In The Man Who Killed Kennedy, you will find out how and why he did it.

Family Communication

Author: Kathleen M. Galvin,Dawn O. Braithwaite,Carma L. Bylund

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317347757

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 412

View: 8112


Family Communication: Cohesion and Change encourages students to observe family interaction patterns analytically and relate communication theories to family interactions. Using a framework of family functions, first-person narratives, and current research, Family Communication: Cohesion and Change emphasizes the diversity of today's families in terms of structure, ethnic patterns, and developmental experiences.