Fragrant Palm Leaves

Author: Thich Nhat Hanh

Publisher: Parallax Press

ISBN: 1946764736

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 224

View: 1775


Regarded by many as Thich Nhat Hanh's most personally revealing and endearing book, these collected journals chronicle the first-hand experiences of the Zen Master as a young man in both the United States and Vietnam, just as his home country is plunged into war and turmoil. "It isn't likely that this collection of journal entries, which I'm calling Fragrant Palm Leaves, will pass the censors... I'll leave Vietnam tomorrow." Thus Thich Nhat Hanh begins his May 11, 1966 journal entry. After leaving Vietnam, he was exiled for calling for peace, and was unable to visit his homeland again until 2004. In the interim, Thich Nhat Hanh continued to practice and teach in the United States and Europe, and became one of the world's most respected spiritual leaders. But when these journals are written, all of that is still to come. Fragrant Palm Leaves reveals a vulnerable and questioning young man, a student and teaching assistant at Princeton and Columbia Universities from 1962-1963, homesick and reflecting on the many difficulties he and his fellow monks faced at home trying to make Buddhism relevant to the people's needs. We also follow Thich Nhat Hanh as he returns to Vietnam in 1964, and helps establish the movement known as Engaged Buddhism. A rare window into the early life of a spiritual icon, Fragrant Palm Leaves provides a model of how to live fully, with awareness, during a time of change and upheaval.

The Prophet and the Bodhisattva

Author: Charles R. Strain

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1630873322

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 8042


Can religious individuals and communities learn from each other in ways that will lead them to collaborate in addressing the great ethical challenges of our time, including climate change and endless warfare? This is the central question underlying The Prophet and the Bodhisattva. It juxtaposes two figures emblematic of an ideal moral life: the prophet as it evolved in ancient Israel and the bodhisattva as it flowered in Mahayana Buddhism. In particular, The Prophet and the Bodhisattva focuses on Daniel Berrigan and Thich Nhat Hanh, who in their lives embody and in their writings reflect upon their respective moral type. Berrigan, a Jesuit priest, pacifist, and poet, is best known for burning draft files in 1968 and for hammering and pouring blood on a nuclear warhead in 1980. His extensive writings on the Hebrew prophets reflect his life of nonviolent activism. Thich Nhat Hanh, Buddhist monk, Vietnamese exile, and poet struggled to end the conflict during the Vietnam War. Since then he has led the global movement that he named Engaged Buddhism and has written many commentaries on Mahayana scriptures. For fifty years both have been teaching us how to pursue peace and justice, a legacy we can draw upon to build a social ethics for our time.

Brothers in the Beloved Community

Author: Marc Andrus

Publisher: Parallax Press

ISBN: 1946764914

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 216

View: 2894


The never-before-told story of the friendship between Martin Luther King Jr. and Thich Nhat Hanh—icons who changed each other and the world The day after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, Thich Nhat Hanh wrote a heartbroken letter to their mutual friend Raphael Gould. He said: "I did not sleep last night. . . . They killed Martin Luther King. They killed us. I am afraid the root of violence is so deep in the heart and mind and manner of this society. They killed him. They killed my hope. I do not know what to say. . . . He made so great an impression in me. This morning I have the impression that I cannot bear the loss." Only a few years earlier, Thich Nhat Hanh wrote an open letter to Martin Luther King Jr. as part of his effort to raise awareness and bring peace in Vietnam. There was an unexpected outcome of Nhat Hanh's letter to King: The two men met in 1966 and 1967 and became not only allies in the peace movement, but friends. This friendship between two prophetic figures from different religions and cultures, from countries at war with one another, reached a great depth in a short period of time. Dr. King nominated Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1967. He wrote: "Thich Nhat Hanh is a holy man, for he is humble and devout. He is a scholar of immense intellectual capacity. His ideas for peace, if applied, would build a monument to ecumenism, to world brotherhood, to humanity." The two men bonded over a vision of the Beloved Community: a vision described recently by Congressman John Lewis as "a nation and world society at peace with itself." It was a concept each knew of because of their membership within the Fellowship of Reconciliation, an international peace organization, and that Martin Luther King Jr. had been popularizing through his work for some time. Thich Nhat Hanh, Andrus shows, took the lineage of the Beloved Community from King and carried it on after his death. In Brothers in the Beloved Community, Marc Andrus tells the little-known story of a friendship between two giants of our time.

The Mindfulness Bell: Thich Nhat Hanh Memorial Issue 89, 2022

Author: The Mindfulness Bell

Publisher: Parallax Press

ISBN: 1952692482

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 118

View: 2649


A journal of the art of mindful living in the Plum Village tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh. The Mindfulness Bell would like to honor Thầy’s transformation by offering this curated collection of highlights from the week of memorial ceremonies; teachings from Thích Nhất Hạnh on death, impermanence, and interbeing; and reflections and recollections of Thầy from elder monastics, lay Dharma teachers, and friends. Whats inside? -Letter from the Editor By Brother Phap Luu -What Can I Say About My Beloved Teacher? By Dr. Larry Ward -Discourse on Taking Refuge in the Island of Oneself

Thich Nhat Hanh’s Sociological Imagination: Essays and Commentaries on Engaged Buddhism—Plus Proceedings from the Panels on “Buddhist Contributions to Social Justice” at the Fifth International Buddhist Conference on the United Nations Day of Vesak held in Hanoi, Vietnam—May 2008

Author: Mohammad H. Tamdgidi

Publisher: Ahead Publishing House (imprint: Okcir Press)

ISBN: 1888024577

Category: Philosophy

Page: 154

View: 2647


This Summer 2008 (VI, 3) issue of Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge is dedicated to an exploration of Thich Nhat Hanh’s Engaged Buddhist philosophy and spiritual theory and practice from a sociological and social scientific vantage point, to highlight the significance his teaching bears for the development of a self-reflective, globally humanist, and environmentally concerned, sociological imagination. Included are several talks, letters, and a poem, by Thich Nhat Hanh on the meaning and practice of Engaged Buddhism—in regard to issues ranging from war and conflict, the environment, food industry and consumption, and history of Engaged Buddhism. Other articles put his views in social science and sociological contexts, specifically exploring the overlapping landscapes of Engaged Buddhism with Pragmatism, Deep Ecology, sociological imagination, and ideological analysis. Other contributions are illustrative of the ways in which Thich Nhat Hanh’s teachings have engaged contexts such as: international conflict; the classroom; urban policing; traumatized populations; economic theory; environmental crisis; and family loss and trauma. A critical commentary by a participant’s experience of attending one of Thich Nhat Hanh’s retreats in 2005 is also included, followed by a response from a representative of the Plum Village community in France. Contributors include: Thich Nhat Hanh, Winston Langley, Michael C. Adorjan, Benjamin W. Kelly, Julie Gregory, Samah Sabra, Darren Noy, Sujin Choi, Marc Black, Samiyeh Sharqawi, Richard Brady, Michael J. DeValve, Cary D. Adkinson, Robert Brian Wall, Glenn Manga, Angela Tam, Karen Hilsberg, Lisa Kemmerer, Bhikshuni Chan Tung Nghiem (Barbara Newell), Robert Andrew Parker, and Mohammad H. Tamdgidi (also as journal editor-in-chief). Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge is a publication of OKCIR: The Omar Khayyam Center for Integrative Research in Utopia, Mysticism, and Science (Utopystics). For more information about OKCIR and other issues in its journal’s Edited Collection as well as Monograph and Translation series visit OKCIR’s homepage.

Going Home

Author: Thich Nhat Hanh

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1440673128

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 7728


"[Thich Nhat Hanh] shows us the connection between personal, inner peace and peace on earth." --His Holiness The Dalai Lama Nominated by Martin Luther King, Jr. for a Nobel Peace Prize, Thich Nhat Hanh is one of today’s leading sources of wisdom, peace, compassion and comfort. Exiled from Vietnam over thirty years ago, Thich Nhat Hanh has become known as a healer of the heart, a monk who shows us how the everyday world can both enrich and endanger our spiritual lives. In this book, Jesus and Buddha share a conversation about prayer and ritual and renewal, and about where such concepts as resurrection and the practice of mindfulness converge. In this unique way, Thich Nhat Hanh shows the brotherhood between Jesus and Buddha-- and in the process shows how we can take their wisdom into the world with us, to "practice in such a way that Buddha is born every moment of our daily life, that Jesus Christ is born every moment of our daily life."

Walking in Two Worlds

Author: Stephen G. Gilligan,Dvorah Simon

Publisher: Zeig Tucker & Theisen Publishers

ISBN: 9781932462111

Category: Medical

Page: 428

View: 3646


Call Me By My True Names

Author: Thich Nhat Hanh

Publisher: Parallax Press

ISBN: 195269227X

Category: Poetry

Page: 259

View: 1087


"Thich Nhat Hanh's work has proven to be the antidote to our modern pain and sorrows." —Ocean Vuong The definitive poetry collection by the world renowned Zen master, peace activist, and author of The Miracle of Mindfulness Though he is best known for his groundbreaking and accessible works on applying mindfulness to everyday life, Thich Nhat Hanh is also a distinguished poet and Nobel Peace Prize nominee. This stunning poetry collection explores these lesser-known facets of Nhat Hanh’s life, revealing not only his path to becoming a Zen meditation teacher but his skill as a poet, his achievements as a peace activist, and his experiences as a young refugee. Through more than fifty poems spanning several decades, Nhat Hanh reveals the stories of his past—from his childhood in war-torn Vietnam to the beginnings of his own spiritual journey—and shares his ideas on how we can come together to create a more peaceful, compassionate world. Uplifting, insightful, and profound, Call Me By My True Names is at once an exquisite work of poetry and a portrait of one of the world’s greatest Zen masters and peacemakers.

Wisdom for the Soul

Author: Larry Chang

Publisher: Gnosophia Publishers

ISBN: 0977339106

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 817

View: 7251


There's a fresh take on an old standby, the book of quotations. The difference with Wisdom for the Soul is in the selection and organization of the quotations. Each has been chosen for its universal application and poetic quality, grouped into one of 220 themes. While the usual subjects, are represented, the collection encompasses newer psychological territory such as Actualization, Avoidance/Denial, Chaos/Uncertainty, Polarity, Synergy, Unconscious, and more. Although the primary aim of the collection is self-help for the individual, with extensive cross-references to factors that foster or deter growth and well-being, the material will appeal to the quotation collector, speech-writer, and the general reader.