Growing Up with Ireland

Author: Valerie Cox

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1529337372

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6917


'An incredible portal to our past' The Sunday Times On 7 January 1922, Ireland became a free state. Born into that era of turbulence and hope were the twenty-six women and men whose stories and memories of a lifetime are captured by cherished Irish journalist Valerie Cox. From living memory come stories of the arrival of electricity, story-telling at 'rambling houses', raising a family in an earlier era, the scourge of TB, the big snow of 1932 and hiding out when the Black and Tans raided. These evocative pieces reflect both a simpler time and a tougher one, where childhood was short and the world of work beckoned from an early age. Growing Up With Ireland is a compelling portrait of an Ireland in some ways warmly familiar, and in others changed beyond recognition, from those who were there at the beginning. 'A comprehensive and evocative insight into a century of Irish life ... a valuable record' Irish Examiner

Another Country – Growing Up In ’50s Ireland

Author: Gene Kerrigan

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 0717166562

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 231

View: 1924


From First Communions to CIÉ Mystery Tours – the heartwarming story of award-winning journalist Gene Kerrigan’s childhood in Dublin in the ’50s In his highly addictive style, Gene Kerrigan effortlessly reconstructs the Ireland of the 1950s and early ’60s in which he grew up. An adult world of absolute moral certainties, casual cruelties and mass emigration; for children an age of innocence, but an innocence hemmed in by fear and guilt. In this brilliant and humorous memoir, Kerrigan tells of a world that now seems as distant as another country. Into the details of school, street and family life, of Christmas, First Communion, school violence, CIE Mystery Tours and the arrival of television are woven the political background of the day and recollections of the impact of major figures: Michael O Hehir, Seán Lemass, Eamon ‘Dev’ De Valera, JFK, not to mention Hector Grey, Shane, Davy Crockett and Audie Murphy. It’s a compelling, touching and often very funny account of a happy childhood in a country that was itself far from happy.

Growing Up in Nineteenth-Century Ireland

Author: Mary Hatfield

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192581457

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 1146


Why do we send children to school? Who should take responsibility for children's health and education? Should girls and boys be educated separately or together? These questions provoke much contemporary debate, but also have a longer, often-overlooked history. Mary Hatfield explores these questions and more in this comprehensive cultural history of childhood in nineteenth-century Ireland. Many modern ideas about Irish childhood have their roots in the first three-quarters of the nineteenth century, when an emerging middle-class took a disproportionate role in shaping the definition of a 'good' childhood. This study deconstructs several key changes in medical care, educational provision, and ideals of parental care. It takes an innovative holistic approach to the middle-class child's social world, by synthesising a broad base of documentary, visual, and material sources, including clothes, books, medical treatises, religious tracts, photographs, illustrations, and autobiographies. It offers invaluable new insights into Irish boarding schools, the material culture of childhood, and the experience of boys and girls in education.

Irish Children's Literature and Culture

Author: Keith O'Sullivan,Valerie Coghlan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113682510X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 7622


Irish Children’s Literature and Culture looks critically at Irish writing for children from the 1980s to the present, examining the work of many writers and illustrators and engaging with major genres, forms, and issues, including the gothic, the speculative, picturebooks, ethnicity, and globalization. It contextualizes modern Irish children’s literature in relation to Irish mythology and earlier writings, as well as in relation to Irish writing for adults, thereby demonstrating the complexity of this fascinating area. What constitutes a "national literature" is rarely straightforward, and it is especially complex when discussing writing for young people in an Irish context. Until recently, there was only a slight body of work that could be classified as "Irish children’s literature" in comparison with Ireland’s contribution to adult literature in the twentieth century. The contributors to the volume examine a range of texts in relation to contemporary literary and cultural theory, and children’s literature internationally, raising provocative questions about the future of the topic. Irish Children’s Literature and Culture is essential reading for those interested in Irish literature, culture, sociology, childhood, and children’s literature. Valerie Coghlan, Church of Ireland College of Education, Dublin, is a librarian and lecturer. She is a former co-editor of Bookbird: An International Journal of Children's Literature. She has published widely on Irish children's literature and co-edited several books on the topic. She is a former board member of the IRSCL, and a founder member of the Irish Society for the Study of Children's Literature, Children's Books Ireland, and IBBY Ireland. Keith O’Sullivan lectures in English at the Church of Ireland College of Education, Dublin. He is a founder member of the Irish Society for the Study of Children’s Literature, a former member of the board of directors of Children’s Books Ireland, and past chair of the Children’s Books Ireland/Bisto Book of the Year Awards. He has published on the works of Philip Pullman and Emily Brontë.

Independence Memories

Author: Valerie Cox

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1529339847

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5076


A PEOPLE'S PORTRAIT OF A PERIOD OF MOMENTOUS CHANGE IN IRISH HISTORY. Independence Memories is a fascinating social history, from living and inherited memory, of the period surrounding Irish Independence and the Civil War. It was a time of violence, of death, of emigration, of families divided into pro- and anti-Treaty, Michael Collins and Eamon de Valera. Against a tapestry of safe houses and mountain hide outs, people fell in love, raised families and laid the foundations of the country we live in now. We read the story of Galwayman Michael Feerick, who rode his white horse through the streets of Dunmore, shouting 'blackguards' at the Black and Tans. We meet the two Mollys, Dublin street traders and runners for Michael Collins, who sewed bullets into the hems of their long skirts. We relive the attack by the Black and Tans on the home of gamekeeper John Vahey and we hear from the Kavanagh family who were offered £1 for every year of the life of their 19-year-old daughter, Mary Ellen, shot dead in Buncrana. And, memorably, 107-year-old Máirín Hughes shares fascinating recollections of being kept in school in Killarney when there was an attack on the RIC barracks down the road. A wonderful compendium of stories and memories by Ireland's oldest citizens, from the much-loved author of Growing Up With Ireland.

Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century

Author: David Pierce

Publisher: Cork University Press

ISBN: 9781859182086

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1351

View: 2255


With five Nobel Prize-winners, seven Pulitzer Prize-winners and two Booker Prize-winning novelists, modern Irish writing has contributed something special and permanent to our understanding of the twentieth century. Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century provides a useful, comprehensive and pleasurable introduction to modern Irish literature in a single volume. Organized chronologically by decade, this anthology provides the reader with a unique sense of the development and richness of Irish writing and of the society it reflected. It embraces all forms of writing, not only the major forms of drama, fiction and verse, but such material as travel writing, personal memoirs, journalism, interviews and radio plays, to offer the reader a complete and wonderfully varied sense of Ireland's contribution our literary heritage. David Pierce has selected major literary figures as well as neglected ones, and includes many writers from the Irish diaspora. The range of material is enormous, and ensures that work that is inaccessible or out of print is now easily available. The book is a delightful compilation, including many well known pieces and captivating "discoveries," which anyone interested in literature will long enjoy browsing and dipping into.

Parliamentary Debates

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7167


The New Ireland Review

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1710