Holding the Man

Author: Timothy Conigrave

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 9780143009498

Category: AIDS (Disease)

Page: 304

View: 2978


"The mid-seventies and satin baggies and chunky platforms reigned supreme. Jethro Tull did battle with glam-rock for the airwaves. At an all-boys Catholic school in Melbourne, Timothy Conigrave fell wildly and sweetly in love with the captain of the football team. So began a relationship that was to last for 15 years, a love affair that weathered disapproval, separation and, ultimately death. Holding the Man recreates that relationship. With honesty and insight it explores the highs and lows of any partnership: the intimacy, constraints, temptations. And the strength of heart both men had to find when they tested positive to HIV. This is a book as refreshing and uplifting as it is moving; a funny and sad and celebratory account of growing up gay."--Provided by publisher.

The Power Of One

Author: Bryce Courtenay

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0857960296

Category: Fiction

Page: 636

View: 4986


First with your head and then with your heart . . . To Peekay, a seven-year-old boy who dreams of being the welterweight champion of the world, this is a piece of advice that he will carry with him throughout his life. Born in a South Africa divided by racism and hatred, this one small boy will come to lead all the tribes of Africa. And in a final conflict with his childhood enemy, the Judge, Peekay will fight to the death for justice. Bryce Courtenay's classic bestseller is a story of the triumph of the human spirit a spellbinding tale for all ages. Stay in touch with all of Bryce's news on Facebook:facebook.com/BryceCourtenay

The Popular Science Review

Author: James Samuelson,Henry Lawson,William Sweetland Dallas

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 2125


The Penguins Ate My Postcards

Author: Arlene Pullen

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1477160256

Category: Travel

Page: 235

View: 6302


The Penguins Ate My Postcards tells the story of one womans connections with people and places as she traveled around the world. It consists of essays, grouped by theme, of varying lengths and moods. They can be read in any order and independently of one another. Sections One provides anecdotes about people the author met in the USSR, Australia, Cambodia, and Europe. Most of their stories are light and entertaining, but they all identify some characteristics of human beings in specific situations all of us have faced. Section Two through Section Five describe some of the places the author has traveled. She combines her feelings as she stood atop mountains or glaciers and watched the sun set behind them with the reality of the beauty she was capturing with her camera. Some of the essays are memoirs from the time when Communism ruled a vast part of the world, and traveling was different in Iron Curtain countries from what it is now. Shell take you on her taxi ride through Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin and on her train ride from Leningrad through the Baltic countries and Poland into East Berlin. Because the author was a teacher, shell share with you some of the literary and historic sites she visited, combining some facts with her impressions and some incidents that occurred in those places. Youll laugh along with her as she compares the people she met with beloved literary characters youll remember from your high school and college English classes. Youll become pensive when she relates stories about genocide and civil strife in some of the Asian countries she has visited. Youll share some of her professional experiences as she visited schools in South Africa, Cambodia, England, China, and Vietnam, with her focus being on the conditions in which teachers and students interacted for learning. Youll remember the children. Some of the essays contain anecdotes about encounters with penguins in Antarctica, polar bears in the tundra, kangaroos in Australia, and camels in Egypt. The settings of her tales are diverse, and the enjoyment of being close to wild animals in their native habitat is strong. Youll walk alongside waterfalls, down mountain trails, within the remains of ancient civilizations, and in buildings constructed for some unique reasons. Section Six deals with the benefits of traveling, as the author illustrates some of the rules governing safe travel, especially for a woman traveling alone. She writes about the danger she encountered when the airplane tires blew while the plane was above the Himalayan Mountains, and when she walked alone in some remote places. She provides humorous stories dealing with language differences in European countries. One essay extols the value of having a competent travel agent and tour guide, again with anecdotes that identify the relationship she had with agents who prepared some of her trips. Finally, the book answers the most frequently asked question of experienced travelers: Whats your favorite place? The Penguins Ate My Postcards is an enjoyable collection of informal, personal essays that will keep you interested in the people and places being featured as they give you a strong impression of the location in which the events occurred. These essays are not the result of someones imagination; the incidents actually happened, and the author was an eye-witness to them. As you read, youll recognize that the author has separated life into serious situations and light, humorous moods, but she treats all the participants with the respect and sensitivity necessary to tell their stories. Perhaps, after you read The Penguins Ate My Postcards youll want to explore the world and find your own adventures. Happy reading.

Mawson

Author: Peter FitzSimons

Publisher: Random House Australia

ISBN: 1742752799

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 737

View: 3211


History comes to life with Peter FitzSimons in the story of Australia's most famous polar explorer and the giants from the heroic age of polar exploration: Scott, Amundsen and Shackleton. Sir Douglas Mawson, born in 1882 and knighted in 1914, remains Australia's greatest Antarctic explorer. On 2 December 1911, his Australasian Antarctic Expedition left Hobart to explore the virgin frozen coastline below Australia, 2000 miles of which had never felt the tread of a human foot. He was on his way to fulfil a national dream he had first conceived three years earlier, while on his first trip to the frozen continent on the Nimrod expedition under the leadership of the charismatic Anglo-Irishman Sir Ernest Shackleton. Even as Mawson and his men were approaching Antarctica, two other famous Antarctic explorers were already engaged in nothing less than a race to become the first men to reach the South Pole. While Roald Amundsen of Norway, with his small team, was racing with dogs along one route, England's legendary Scott of the Antarctic, with his far larger team, was relying primarily on ponies and 'man-hauling' to get there along another. As Mawson and his men make their home on the windiest place on earth and prepare for their own record-breaking treks, with devastating drama to be their constant companion, the stories of Amundsen and Scott similarly play out. With his trademark in-depth research, FitzSimons provides a compelling portrait of these great Antarctic explorers. For the first time, he weaves together their legendary feats into one thrilling account, bringing the jaw-dropping events of this bygone era dazzlingly back to life.

The Living Age

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3533


Mawson

Author: Peter FitzSimons

Publisher: Random House Australia

ISBN: 0857987208

Category: Antarctica

Page: 768

View: 1178


The story of Australia's most famous polar explorer, Sir Douglas Mawson, and the giants from the heroic age of polar exploration: Scott, Amundsen and Shackleton. The author provides a portrait of these great Antarctic explorers and weaves together their legendary feats into one account.