Handbook of Symbolic Interactionism

Author: Larry T. Reynolds,Nancy J. Herman-Kinney

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 9780759100923

Category: Social Science

Page: 1077

View: 9428


Symbolic interactionism has a long history in sociology, social psychology, and related social sciences. In this volume, the editors and contributors explain its history, major theoretical tenets and concepts, methods of doing symbolic interactionist work, and its uses and findings in a host of substantive research areas.

The Faultline of Consciousness

Author: David Maines

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351482858

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 837


In this compendium of related and cross-referential essays, David R. Maines draws from pragmatist/symbolic interactionist assumptions to formulate a consistent new view of the entire field of sociology. Suitable for courses in social theory, qualitative methods, social psychology, and narrative inquiry, this volume will change the way the general public looks at interpretive sociology.This book is organized as an expression of the centrality of interactionism to general sociology. Each chapter is designed to articulate this view of the field. Symbolic interactionism, the way Maines has come to understand and use it, is essentially the concerted application of pragmatist principles of philosophy to social inquiry.There are four basic elements to this characterization. First, people transform themselves: people are self-aware beings who reflexively form their conduct and thus are capable of adjusting their lines of action and creating new ones. Second, people transform their social worlds: human action takes place in contexts of situations and social worlds. People can modify the social matrices in which they act, and thus people are agents of change. Third, people engage in social dialogue: communication is generic and is at the heart of both stability and change. A fourth element is that people respond to and deal with their transformations. Humans construct situations and societies; they establish social structures and cultures. These are the consequences of human action and, once formed, they reflexively function to direct and channel conduct.Maines argues that when people do things together they can create enduring group formations, such as divisions of labor, rules for inheritance, wage-labor relations, or ideologies. These are instances of group characteristics that influence human conduct and indeed are not reducible to the traits of individuals making up the group or society.

Symbolic Interactionism: The Basics

Author: Charles Quist-Adade

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN: 162273517X

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 2790


This book is a survey of Symbolic Interaction. In thirteen short chapters, it traces the history, the social philosophical roots, the founders, “movers and shakers” and evolution of the theory. Symbolic Interactionism: The Basics takes the reader along the exciting, but tortuous journey of the theory and explores both the meta-theoretical and mini-theoretical roots and branches of the theory. Symbolic interactionism or sociological social psychology traces its roots to the works of United States sociologists George Hebert Mead, Charles Horton Cooley, and Herbert Blumer, and a Canadian sociologist, Erving Goffman; Other influences are Harold Garfinkel’s Ethnomethodology and Austrian-American Alfred Schutz’s study of Phenomenology. Symbolic Interactionism: Basics explores the philosophical sources of symbolic interactionism, including pragmatism, social behaviorism, and neo-Hegelianism. The intellectual origins of symbolic interactions can be attributed to the works of William James, George Simmel, John Dewey, Max Weber, and George Herbert Mead. Mead is believed to be the founder of the theory, although he did not publish any academic work on the paradigm. The book highlights the works of the intellectual heirs of symbolic interactionism— Herbert Blumer, Mead’s former student, who was instrumental in publishing the lectures his former professor posthumously with the title Symbolic Interactionism, Erving Goffman and Robert Park.

The Faultline of Consciousness

Author: David R. Maines

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9780202369662

Category: Social Science

Page: 286

View: 3310


In this compendium of related and cross-referential essays, David R. Maines draws from pragmatist/symbolic interactionist assumptions to formulate a consistent new view of the entire field of sociology. Suitable for courses in social theory, qualitative methods, social psychology, and narrative inquiry, this volume will change the way the general public looks at interpretive sociology. This book is organized as an expression of the centrality of interactionism to general sociology. Each chapter is designed to articulate this view of the field. Symbolic interactionism, the way Maines has come to understand and use it, is essentially the concerted application of pragmatist principles of philosophy to social inquiry. There are four basic elements to this characterization. First, people transform themselves: people are self-aware beings who reflexively form their conduct and thus are capable of adjusting their lines of action and creating new ones. Second, people transform their social worlds: human action takes place in contexts of situations and social worlds. People can modify the social matrices in which they act, and thus people are agents of change. Third, people engage in social dialogue: communication is generic and is at the heart of both stability and change. A fourth element is that people respond to and deal with their transformations. Humans construct situations and societies; they establish social structures and cultures. These are the consequences of human action, and once formed they reflexively function to direct and channel conduct. Maines argues that when people do things together they can create enduring group formations, such as divisions of labor, rules for inheritance, wage-labor relations, or ideologies. These are instances of group characteristics that influence human conduct and indeed are not reducible to the traits of individuals making up the group or society. David R. Maines is professor and chair of sociology and anthropology at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, where he teaches courses on urban sociology and social stratification. He was one of the founding members of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction, and in 1999 received the SSSI George Herbert Mead Award for lifetime contributions to scholarship.

Symbolic Interactionism

Author: Sheldon Stryker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781930665484

Category: Social Science

Page: 161

View: 3656


This book, originally published in 1980 and reprinted here with a new foreword from the author, succinctly and clearly developed a well-argued case for symbolic interaction as a method and as a theory of human social behavior. It treats historical as well as contemporary figures and presents the author's original and stimulating assessment of the merits, shortcomings and future of symbolic interactionism. "Sheldon Stryker's Symbolic Interactionism not only reviews the key figures who founded this tradition, but more fundamentally, it also presents a formal theory. This theory still represents one of the most important statements within the symbolic interactionist tradition. In this theory, Stryker attempts to explain the dynamics of identity formation, particularly the salience of an identity, the consequences of identity for role performances, and the shifting commitments to a particular identity. Like all important theories, this one is timeless and continues to inform theory and research in the social sciences." Jonathan H. Turner, Distinguished Professor of Sociology, University of California, Riverside. "This is the book that brought structural symbolic interaction theory to the attention of sociologists and social psychologists around the country and the world. While recognizing the key importance of meanings and definitions of the situation, Stryker's discussion of his eight postulates forms the basis for understanding how and why the self is always embedded in society. This book is a remarkable achievement." Peter J. Burke, Professor, Department of Sociology, University of California, Riverside, California. "Stryker's classic monograph has never been surpassed as a clear, focused exposition of his identity theory and of the agenda for structural symbolic interactionists more generally as they aim for a general theory of self, meaning and action. He brings interactionism to bear on central sociological questions about how social positions become incorporated into the self and shape our social interactions. This is a core statement of the historic roots of symbolic interaction, from one of its major figures. Stryker evaluates the field as it stood in 1980, and clearly states the structure of his own version of interactionism. He shows how symbolic interactionist thought can be used to develop a productive, empirical scientific study of social behavior. As a powerful, forward-looking critique, appreciation and theoretical agenda, this monograph is as useful today as it was when it was originally published." Lynn Smith-Lovin, Duke University Dr. Sheldon Stryker is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Indiana University, semi-retired in 2002 after 51 years on the faculty there. A career-long student of social psychology in general and symbolic interactionism in particular, he has received the Cooley-Mead Award for Lifetime Contributions to Social Psychology from the American Sociological Association Section on Social Psychology and the George Herbert Mead Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction. He remains an active contributor to the theoretical and research literature in social psychology. He has been editor of the ASA's American Sociological Review, Sociometry (now Social Psychology Quarterly) and the Arnold and Carolyn Rose Monograph Series; and he has been a Social Science Research Council Fellow, a Fulbright Research Scholar, and a Fellow, Center for Advances Studies in the Behavioral Sciences.

The Faultline of Consciousness

Author: David R. Maines

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9780202306469

Category: Psychology

Page: 286

View: 9975


In this compendium of related and cross-referential essays, David R. Maines draws from pragmatist/symbolic interactionist assumptions to formulate a consistent new view of the entire field of sociology. Suitable for courses in social theory, qualitative methods, social psychology, and narrative inquiry, this volume will change the way the general public looks at interpretive sociology. This book is organized as an expression of the centrality of interactionism to general sociology. Each chapter is designed to articulate this view of the field. Symbolic interactionism, the way Maines has come to understand and use it, is essentially the concerted application of pragmatist principles of philosophy to social inquiry. There are four basic elements to this characterization. First, people transform themselves: people are self-aware beings who reflexively form their conduct and thus are capable of adjusting their lines of action and creating new ones. Second, people transform their social worlds: human action takes place in contexts of situations and social worlds. People can modify the social matrices in which they act, and thus people are agents of change. Third, people engage in social dialogue: communication is generic and is at the heart of both stability and change. A fourth element is that people respond to and deal with their transformations. Humans construct situations and societies; they establish social structures and cultures. These are the consequences of human action, and once formed they reflexively function to direct and channel conduct. Maines argues that when people do things together they can create enduring group formations, such as divisions of labor, rules for inheritance, wage-labor relations, or ideologies. These are instances of group characteristics that influence human conduct and indeed are not reducible to the traits of individuals making up the group or society. David R. Maines is professor and chair of sociology and anthropology at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, where he teaches courses on urban sociology and social stratification. He was one of the founding members of the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction, and in 1999 received the SSSI George Herbert Mead Award for lifetime contributions to scholarship.

Interactionism

Author: Paul Atkinson,William Housley

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1446223140

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 9744


'Atkinson and Housley have produced a book that is a very competent, interesting and useful addition to other work in the field. Its distinctive contribution for me, lies in the exploration of the relationship between, and developments within interactionist sociologies' - Sociology What is symbolic interactionism? This refreshing and authoritative book provides readers with: · A guide to the essential thinking, research and concepts in interactionism · A demonstration of the use of the interactionist approach · An explaination of why the interactionist influence has not been fully acknowledged in Britain. The authors argue that few sociologists in Britain have identified themselves with symbolic interactionism, even though many have engaged with interactionist ideas in their research and methodological work. We are all interactionists now, in the sense that many of the key ideas of interactionism have become part of the mainstream of sociological thought. Currently fashionable approaches to sociology display a kind of collective amnesia. A good deal of today's ideas that are presented as 'novel' or 'innovative' only appear so because earlier contributions - interactionism among them - are not explicitly acknowledged.

Symbolic Interactionism and Cultural Studies

Author: Norman K. Denzin

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470698411

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 7365


Symbolic interactionism is one of the most enduring - and certainly the most sociological - of all social psychologies. In this landmark work, Norman K. Denzin traces its tortured history from its roots in American pragmatism to its present-day encounter with poststructuralism and postmodernism. Arguing that if interactionism is to continue to thrive and grow it must incorporate elements of post structural and post-modern theory into its underlying views of history, culture and politics, the author develops a research agenda which merges the interactionist sociological imagination with the critical insights on contemporary feminism and cultural studies. Norman Denzin's programmatic analysis of symbolic interactionism, which develops a politics of interpretation merging theory and practice, will be welcomed by students and scholars in a wide range of disciplines, from sociology to cultural studies.

The Interactionist Imagination

Author: Michael Hviid Jacobsen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137581840

Category: Social Science

Page: 442

View: 9728


This book outlines the history and developments of interactionist social thought through a consideration of its key figures. Arranged chronologically, each chapter illustrates the impact that individual sociologists working within an interactionism framework have had on interactionism as perspective and on the discipline of sociology as such. It presents analyses of interactionist theorists from Georg Simmel through to Herbert Bulmer and Erving Goffman and onto the more recent contributions of Arlie R. Hochschild and Gary Alan Fine. Through an engagement with the latest scholarship this work shows that in a discipline often focused on macrosocial developments and large-scale structures, the interactionist perspective which privileges the study of human interaction has continued relevance. The broad scope of this book will make it an invaluable resource for scholars and students of sociology, social theory, cultural studies, media studies, social psychology, criminology and anthropology.