Judge Advocates in Combat

Author: Frederic L. Borch

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: 9780160876615

Category: Judge advocates

Page: 413

View: 7725


A narrative history, includes actions in Vietnam, Grenada, Panama, the Persian Gulf, Somalia, and Haiti, as well as eleven non-combat deployments such as resettlement operations, disaster relief, and civil disturbance operations. Presents the thesis that the role of the military lawyer in military operations has gradually evolved into an "operational law" (OPLAW), which has enhanced mission success.

Judge Advocates in Combat

Author: Frederic L. Borch

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Judge advocates

Page: 413

View: 1675


A narrative history, includes actions in Vietnam, Grenada, Panama, the Persian Gulf, Somalia, and Haiti, as well as eleven non-combat deployments such as resettlement operations, disaster relief, and civil disturbance operations. Presents the thesis that the role of the military lawyer in military operations has gradually evolved into an "operational law" (OPLAW), which has enhanced mission success.

Judge Advocates in Combat

Author: Frederic L. Borch, III

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781530086054

Category:

Page: 434

View: 7013


As the U.S. Army has evolved in the past half-century, the Judge Advocate General's Corps has been an important part of its maturing ability to provide effective military force to meet a broad range of challenges. Since the opening days of American involvement in Vietnam, the U.S. Army has been working to meet national security objectives under close public scrutiny in complex, demanding situations. Those conditions call for commanders to make full use of all available staff input, and the special training of the Staff Judge Advocate has often made the lawyer one of the most important sources of insight. This volume recounts numerous instances when new challenges would not have been met so effectively had that specialized staff work not been available. At one level this is the chronicle of judge advocates at work in the theater of active operations. It provides valuable information on the organization, tasks, and performance of legal offices in a wide array of activities. The author uses the term "combat" to evoke the theater of active operations-justifiable shorthand, but calling too little attention to the operations other than war covered very ably in the last chapter. Throughout, the reader is introduced to Army lawyers who met unexpected requirements while working under tough, demanding conditions. At another level, this is the history of the evolution of "operational lawn-the concept that put those Army lawyers at the right hand of commanders during the deployments of the 1990s so that everything from Status of Forces Agreements to application of the principles of the Law of Land Warfare would be integrated into the planning and execution of operations such as JUST CAUSE and DESERT STORM as well as the many "peacekeeping" operations and deployments in support of civil authorities. This operational focus of judge advocate staff support in addition to traditional legal support-has enhanced mission success in the politically charged and militarily ambiguous operations that have become common in our era.

Judge Advocates in Combat

Author: Center of Military History United States,Center of Military History United States Army

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781507660416

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 4938


Judge Advocates in Combat is the first narrative history to examine how Army lawyers enhanced mission success during both traditional combat operations and military operations other than war. Frederic L. Borch looks at the years between 1959 and 1996-when the first judge advocate reported for duty in Vietnam and when the last one serving in Haiti returned home to the United States. Relying on hundreds of interviews, Borch demonstrates that during this tumultuous period of complex, politically charged, military ambiguous operations at home and overseas the role of Army lawyers changed dramatically and in the end contributed greatly to overall mission accomplishment. The contingency-oriented U.S. Army has met and continues to meet national security objectives under close public scrutiny, and its reliance on judge advocates as important force multipliers in the full spectrum of military operations will ensure their ongoing transformation.

Judge Advocates in Vietnam

Author: Frederic L. Borch III

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781410217721

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 3759


Although the first American soldiers arrived in Saigon in late 1950, the first Army judge advocate did not deploy to Vietnam until 1959, when Lt. Col. Paul J. Durbin reported for duty. From then until 1975 when Saigon fell and the last few U.S. military personnel left Vietnam, Army lawyers played a significant role in what is still America's "longest war." Judge Advocates in Vietnam: Army Lawyers in Southeast Asia (1959-1975) tells the story of these soldier-lawyers in headquarters units like the Saigon-based Military Assistance Advisory Group and Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV). But it also examines the individual experiences of judge advocates in combat organizations like II Field Force, 1st Air Cavalry Division, and the 25th Infantry Division. Almost without exception, Army lawyers recognized that the unconventional nature of guerrilla warfare required them to practice law in new and non-traditional ways. Consequently, many judge advocates serving in Vietnam between 1959 and 1975 looked for new ways to use their talent and abilities -both legal and non-legal- to enhance mission success. While this was not what judge advocates today refer to as "operational law" -that compendium of domestic, foreign, and international law applicable to U.S. forces engaged in combat or operations other than war- the efforts of these Vietnam-era lawyers were a major force in shaping today's view that judge advocates are most effective if they are integrated into Army operations at all levels. Judge Advocates in Vietnam is not the first book about lawyering in Southeast Asia. On the contrary, Maj. Gen. George S. Prugh's Law at War, published in 1975, was the first look at what judge advocates did in Vietnam. General Prugh's monograph, however, focuses exclusively on legal work done at MACV. Similarly, Col. Fred Borch's Judge Advocates in Combat: Army Lawyers in Military Operations from Vietnam to Haiti has a chapter on law in Southeast Asia, but it is a very brief look at military lawyering in Vietnam. It follows that this new Combat Studies Institute publication is long overdue. Its comprehensive examination of judge advocates in Vietnam -who was there, what they did, and how they did it- fills a void in the history of the Army and the Judge Advocate General's Corps. At the same time, anyone who takes the time to read these pages will come away with a greater appreciation of what it was like to serve as a soldier -and an Army lawyer- in Vietnam. Thomas J. Romig Major General, U.S. Army The Judge Advocate General

Judge Advocates in Vietnam

Author: Frederic L. Borch,Regimental Historian & Archivist the Judge Advocate General's Corps U S Army Frederic L Borch,Combat Studies Institute,U. S. Department Of The Army

Publisher: Militarybookshop.CompanyUK

ISBN: 9781780394497

Category: History

Page: 170

View: 9559


Although the first American soldiers arrived in Saigon in late 1950, the first Army judge advocate did not deploy to Vietnam until 1959, when Lt. Col. Paul J. Durbin reported for duty. From then until 1975 when Saigon fell and the last few U.S. military personnel left Vietnam, Army lawyers played a significant role in what is still America's "longest war." This book tells the story of these soldier-lawyers in headquarters units like the Saigon-based Military Assistance Advisory Group and Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV). But it also examines the individual experiences of judge advocates in combat organizations like II Field Force, 1st Air Cavalry Division, and the 25th Infantry Division. Almost without exception, Army lawyers recognized that the unconventional nature of guerrilla warfare required them to practice law in new and non-traditional ways. Consequently, many judge advocates serving in Vietnam between 1959 and 1975 looked for new ways to use their talent and abilities - both legal and non-legal - to enhance mission success. While this was not what judge advocates today refer to as "operational law" - that compendium of domestic, foreign, and international law applicable to U.S. forces engaged in combat or operations other than war - the efforts of these Vietnam-era lawyers were a major force in shaping today's view that judge advocates are most effective if they are integrated into Army operations at all levels.

Military Justice in Vietnam

Author: William Thomas Allison

Publisher: Modern War Studies (Hardcover)

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 5061


A concise look at how military justice during the Vietnam War served the dual purpose of punishing U.S. solders' crimes and infractions while also serving the important role of promoting core American values--democracy and rule of law--to the Vietnamese.