Kaiser Wilhelm II

Author: John C. G. Röhl

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107072255

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 4215


This is a concise edition of John Röhl's prize-winning three-volume biography of Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. It sheds new light on the Kaiser's troubled youth, his involvement in social and political scandals, and his role in foreign policy decisions that led to the outbreak of the First World War.

Kaiser Wilhelm II

Author: Christopher (St Catherine'S College, University Of Cambridge) Clark

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317891473

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6857


Kaiser Wilhelm II is one of the key figures in the history of twentieth-century Europe: King of Prussia and German Emperor from 1888 to the collapse of Germany in 1918 and a crucial player in the events that led to the outbreak of World War I. Following Kaiser Wilhelm's political career from his youth at the Hohenzollern court through the turbulent peacetime decades of the Wilhelmine era into global war and exile, the book presents a new interpretation of this controversial monarch and assesses the impact on Germany of his forty-year reign.

Wilhelm II

Author: John C. G. Röhl

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521819206

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1287

View: 5128


Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859-1941) ruled Imperial Germany from his accession in 1888 to his enforced abdication in 1918 at the end of the First World War. This book, based on a wealth of previously unpublished archival material, provides the most detailed account ever written of the first half of his reign. Following on from John Rohl's definitive and highly acclaimed Young Wilhelm: The Kaiser's Early Life, 1859-1888 (1998), the volume demonstrates the monarch's dynastic arrogance and the wounding abuse he showered on his own people as, step by step, he built up his personal power. His thirst for glory, his overweening nationalism and militarism and his passion for the navy provided the impetus for a breathtaking long-term goal: the transformation of the German Reich into the foremost power in the world. Urgent warnings from all sides, both against the revival of a semi-absolute Personal Monarchy on the threshold to the twentieth century and against the challenge his goal of 'world power' implied for the existing World Powers Great Britain, France and Russia were brushed aside by the impetuous young ruler with his faithful military retinue and blindly devoted court favourites. Soon the predicted consequences - constitutional crisis at home and diplomatic isolation abroad - began to make their alarming appearance.

The Entourage of Kaiser Wilhelm II, 1888-1918

Author: Isabel V. Hull

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521533218

Category: History

Page: 428

View: 4415


Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859-1941) is one of the most fascinating figures in modern European history. Inheriting 'the mightiest throne on earth' in 1888, he played a central part in fashioning the policies which culminated in the catastrophe of 1914-18, the collapse of the Reich, and his own abdication. To an extraordinary degree he was also representative of his epoch: brilliant, bizarre, aggressive, insecure. Yet German historians have virtually ignored him. In September 1979 a dozen historians met in the Kaiser's palace in Corfu to discuss the character and role of Wilhelm II. This book contains their findings. The early chapters examine the Kaiser's psychological disturbance which, hidden from the public, often caused those who closely worked with him to doubt his sanity. Next, it is revealed how by virtue of the Bismarckian constitution, and with the aid of a small circle of friends, he was able to translate private neurosis into public policy. The later chapters analyse the ideology and image of Kaiserism, discovering mentalities and attitudes which were to survive the collapse of the monarchy in 1918 and play an incalculable part in the undermining of Weimar democracy and the rise of Nazism. The views in this book are fresh and exciting, suggesting new ways in which the interrelationship between individuals and society, between personalities and structures, might be interpreted.

The Kaiser and His Court

Author: John C. G. Röhl

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521565042

Category: History

Page: 275

View: 3111


A personal and political analysis of the reign of Kaiser Wilhelm II using new archival sources.

Kaiser Wilhelm II

Author: John Van der Kiste

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0752499289

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 255

View: 4196


Drawing on a wide range of contemporary sources, this biography examines the complex personality of Germany's last emperor. Born in 1859, the eldest grandchild of Queen Victoria, Prince Wilhelm was torn between two cultures - that of the Prussian Junker and that of the English liberal gentleman.

Wilhelm II

Author: Lamar Cecil

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469639807

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 488

View: 3775


Wilhelm II (1859-1941), King of Prussia and German Emperor from 1888 to 1918, reigned during a period of unprecedented economic, cultural, and intellectual achievement in Germany. Unlike most European sovereigns of his generation, Wilhelm was no mere figurehead, and his imprint on imperial Germany was profound. In this book and a second volume, historian Lamar Cecil provides the first comprehensive biography of one of modern history's most powerful--and most misunderstood--rulers. Wilhelm II: Prince and Emperor, 1859-1900 concentrates on Wilhelm's youth. As Cecil shows, the future ruler's Anglo-German genealogy, his education, and his subsequent service as an officer in the Prussian army proved to be unfortunate legacies in shaping Wilhelm's behavior and ideas. Throughout his thirty-year reign, Wilhelm's connection with his subjects was tenuous. He surrounded himself with a small coterie of persons drawn from the government, the military, and elite society, most of whom were valued not for their ability but for their loyalty to the crown. They, in turn, contrived to keep Wilhelm isolated from outside influences, learned to be accomplished in catering to his prejudices, and strengthened his conviction that the government should be composed only of those who agreed with him. The day-to-day conduct of Germany's affairs was left in the hands of these loyal followers, for the Kaiser himself did not at all enjoy work. Rejoicing instead in pageantry and the superficial trappings of authority, he was particular about what he did and what he read, eliminating anything that was unpleasant, difficult, or tedious. He never learned to listen, to reason, or to make decisions in a sound, informed manner; he was customarily inclined to act solely on the basis of his personal feelings. Many people believed him to be mad. Even courtiers who admired Wilhelm recognized that he was responsible for the diplomatic embarrassment in which Germany found itself by 1914 and that the Kaiser's maladroit behavior endangered the prestige of the Hohenzollern crown. His is the story of a bizarre and incapable sovereign who never doubted that he possessed both genius and divine inspiration. Originally published in 1989. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.