Wake Up!

Author: Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan,Marlon Hall

Publisher: Abingdon Press

ISBN: 1426703015

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 3083


"Once seen as only advocating violence, Hip Hop can be the church's agent of salvation and praise to transform society. After looking at Hip Hop's sociohistorical context, including its African roots, Wake Up! shows how Hip Hop now embodies the worldviewof growing numbers of youth and young adults in all churches. The book also examines the inherent religious themes embedded in Hip Hop music"--Cover p. [4].

Killing Rage

Author: bell hooks

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780805050271

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 277

View: 4583


Twenty-three essays ponder such topics as psychological trauma among African Americans, black anti-Semitism, and friendships between black women and white women. Reprint. 25,000 first printing. $20,000 ad/promo.

Deeper Shades of Purple

Author: Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814727522

Category: Religion

Page: 331

View: 4500


Womanist approaches to the study of religion and society have contributed much to our understanding of Black religious life, activism, and women's liberation. Deeper Shades of Purple explores the achievements of this movement over the past two decades and evaluates some of the leading voices and different perspectives within this burgeoning field. Deeper Shades of Purple brings together a who's who of scholars in the study of Black women and religion who view their scholarship through a womanist critical lens. The contributors revisit Alice Walker's definition of womanism for its viability for the approaches to discourses in religion of Black women scholars. Whereas Walker has defined what it means to be womanist, these contributors define what it means to practice womanism, and illuminate how womanism has been used as a vantage point for the theoretical orientations and methodological approaches of Black women scholar-activists. Contributors: Karen Baker-Fletcher, Katie G. Cannon, M. Shawn Copeland, Kelly Brown Douglas, Carol B. Duncan, Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas, Rachel Elizabeth Harding, Rosemarie Freeney Harding, Melanie L. Harris, Diana L. Hayes, Dwight N. Hopkins, Ada María Isasi-Díaz, Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan, Kwok Pui-Lan, Daisy L. Machado, Debra Majeed, Anthony B. Pinn, Rosetta Ross, Letty M. Russell, Shani Settles, Dianne M. Stewart, Raedorah Stewart-Dodd, Emilie M. Townes, Traci C. West, and Nancy Lynne Westfield.

Black Feelings

Author: Lisa M. Corrigan

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496827961

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 5969


In the 1969 issue of Negro Digest, a young Black Arts Movement poet then-named Ameer (Amiri) Baraka published “We Are Our Feeling: The Black Aesthetic.” Baraka’s emphasis on the importance of feelings in black selfhood expressed a touchstone for how the black liberation movement grappled with emotions in response to the politics and racial violence of the era. In her latest book, award-winning author Lisa M. Corrigan suggests that Black Power provided a significant repository for negative feelings, largely black pessimism, to resist the constant physical violence against black activists and the psychological strain of political disappointment. Corrigan asserts the emergence of Black Power as a discourse of black emotional invention in opposition to Kennedy-era white hope. As integration became the prevailing discourse of racial liberalism shaping midcentury discursive structures, so too, did racial feelings mold the biopolitical order of postmodern life in America. By examining the discourses produced by Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, Huey Newton, Eldridge Cleaver, and other Black Power icons who were marshaling black feelings in the service of black political action, Corrigan traces how black liberation activists mobilized new emotional repertoires

The Physiology of Sexist and Racist Oppression

Author: Shannon Sullivan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190269707

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 8570


While gender and race often are considered socially constructed, this book argues that they are physiologically constituted through the biopsychosocial effects of sexism and racism. This means that to be fully successful, critical philosophy of race and feminist philosophy need to examine not only the financial, legal, political and other forms of racist and sexism oppression, but also their physiological operations. Examining a complex tangle of affects, emotions, knowledge, and privilege, The Physiology of Sexist and Racist Oppression develops an understanding of the human body whose unconscious habits are biological. On this account, affect and emotion are thoroughly somatic, not something "mental" or extra-biological layered on top of the body. They also are interpersonal, social, and can be transactionally transmitted between people. Ranging from the stomach and the gut to the hips and the heart, from autoimmune diseases to epigenetic markers, Sullivan demonstrates the gastrointestinal effects of sexual abuse that disproportionately affect women, often manifesting as IBS, Crohn's disease, or similar functional disorders. She also explores the transgenerational effects of racism via epigenetic changes in African American women, who experience much higher pre-term birth rates than white women do, and she reveals the unjust benefits for heart health experienced by white people as a result of their racial privilege. Finally, developing the notion of a physiological therapy that doesn't prioritize bringing unconscious habits to conscious awareness, Sullivan closes with a double-barreled approach for both working for institutional change and transforming biologically unconscious habits. The Physiology of Sexist and Racist Oppression skillfully combines feminist and critical philosophy of race with the biological and health sciences. The result is a critical physiology of race and gender that offers new strategies for fighting male and white privilege.

Teaching Race in Perilous Times

Author: Jason E. Cohen,Sharon D. Raynor,Dwayne A. Mack

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438482272

Category: Education

Page: 398

View: 4968


Multidisciplinary anthology on teaching issues of race and racism in US college classrooms. The college classroom is inevitably influenced by, and in turn influences, the world around it. In the United States, this means the complex topic of race can come into play in ways that are both explicit and implicit. Teaching Race in Perilous Times highlights and confronts the challenges of teaching race in the United States—from syllabus development and pedagogical strategies to accreditation and curricular reform. Across fifteen original essays, contributors draw on their experiences teaching in different institutional contexts and adopt various qualitative methods from their home disciplines to offer practical strategies for discussing race and racism with students while also reflecting on broader issues in higher education. Contributors examine how teachers can respond productively to emotionally charged contexts, recognize the roles and pressures that faculty assume as activists in the classroom, focus a timely lens on the shifting racial politics and economics of higher education, and call for a more historically sensitive reading of the pedagogies involved in teaching race. The volume offers a corrective to claims following the 2016 US presidential election that the current moment is unprecedented, highlighting the pivotal role of the classroom in contextualizing and responding to our perilous times. Jason E. Cohen Associate Professor of English at Berea College. Sharon D. Raynor is Dean of the School of the Humanities and Social Sciences, and Professor of English at Elizabeth City State University. Dwayne A. Mack is Professor of History and Carter G. Woodson Chair in African American History at Berea College.

The Ideology of Hatred:The Psychic Power of Discourse

Author: Niza Yanay

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 0823250040

Category: Philosophy

Page: 155

View: 3750


This title suggests that untying and recognising relations of intimacy and dependency can, under certain circumstances, change the discourse of hatred into relations of peace and even friendship.

Asian American Literature in Transition, 1965–1996: Volume 3

Author: Asha Nadkarni,Cathy J. Schlund-Vials

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108922317

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 2920


Asian American Literature in Transition Volume Three: 1965–1996 offers a multidisciplinary perspective on the political and aesthetic stakes of what is now recognizable as an Asian American literary canon. It takes as its central focus the connections among literature, history, and migration, exploring how the formation of Asian American literary studies is necessarily inflected by demographic changes, student activism, the institutionalization of Asian American studies within the U.S. academy, U.S foreign policy (specifically the Cold War and conflicts in Southeast Asia), and the emergence of 'diaspora' and 'transnationalism' as important critical frames. Moving through sections that consider migration and identity, aesthetics and politics, canon formation, and transnationalism and diaspora, this volume tracks predominant themes within Asian American literature to interrogate an ever-evolving field. It features nineteen original essays by leading scholars, and is accessible to beginners in the field and more advanced researchers alike.

The Oxford Handbook of Feminist Theology

Author: Mary McClintock Fulkerson,Sheila Briggs

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019927388X

Category: Political Science

Page: 580

View: 5759


This volume highlights the relevance of globalization and the insights of gender studies and religious studies for feminist theology. It focuses on the changing global contexts for the field and its movement towards new models of theology, distinct from the forms of traditional Christian systematic theology and of secular feminism.

Transcending the Talented Tenth

Author: Joy James

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136672699

Category: History

Page: 222

View: 8699


In Transcending the Talented Tenth, Joy James provocatively examines African American intellectual responses to racism and the role of elitism, sexism and anti-radicalism in black leadership politics throughout history. She begins with Du Bois' construction of "the Talented Tenth" as an elite leadership of race managers and takes us through the lives and work of radical women in the anti-lynching crusades, the civil rights and black liberation movements, as well as explores the contemporary struggles among black elites in academe.