Legends, Charms and Superstitions of Ireland

Author: Lady Wilde

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486120767

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 9468


Features an Irish view of a spiritual and invisible world populated by fairies, elves, and evil beings as described through eerie tales and beguiling accounts of superstitions, animal legends, and ancient charms.

Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland

Author: Francesca Wilde

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN: 3849623696

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 470

View: 8881


Many of the Irish legends, superstitions, and ancient charms now collected were obtained chiefly from oral communications made by the peasantry themselves, either in Irish or in the Irish-English which preserves so much of the expressive idiom of the antique tongue. These narrations were taken down by competent persons skilled in both languages, and as far as possible in the very words of the narrator; so that much of the primitive simplicity of the style has been retained, while the legends have a peculiar and special value as coming direct from the national heart.

Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland

Author: Francesca S. Wilde

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN: 384967360X

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 3755


Many of the Irish legends, superstitions, and ancient charms now collected were obtained chiefly from oral communications made by the peasantry themselves, either in Irish or in the Irish-English which preserves so much of the expressive idiom of the antique tongue. These narrations were taken down by competent persons skilled in both languages, and as far as possible in the very words of the narrator; so that much of the primitive simplicity of the style has been retained, while the legends have a peculiar and special value as coming direct from the national heart.

Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms and Superstitions of Ireland - With Sketches of the Irish Past

Author: Lady Wilde

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1528763041

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 481


This antiquarian text deals with the mythology of the Irish race. It contains information on their mystical superstitions that are thousands of years old, but still influence the daily life of many. This fascinating and insightful book will appeal to those with a penchant for mysticism and fairy-folk, and is a veritable must-read for those with a serious interest in Irish mythology. The chapters of this text include: 'Rathlin Island', 'The Strange Guests', 'The Dead Soldier', 'The Three Gifts', 'The Fairies as Fallen Angels', 'The Fairy Changeling', 'Fairy Wiles', 'Shaun-Mor', 'The Save Fairies', 'The Tuatha-De-Danann', 'Edain the Queen', 'The Royal Steed', 'Evil Spells', etcetera. We are republishing this antiquarian text now in an affordable, modern edition, complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author.

Ancient legends, Mystic Charms & Superstitions of Ireland

Author: Jane Francesca Agnes Wilde

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 375042232X

Category: Social Science

Page: 586

View: 6553


The three great sources of knowledge respecting the shrouded part of humanity are the language, the mythology, and the ancient monuments of a country. From the language one learns the mental and social height to which a nation had reached at any given period in arts, habits, and civilization, with the relation of man to man, and to the material and visible world. The mythology of a people reveals their relation to a spiritual and invisible world; while the early monuments are solemn and eternal symbols of religious faith-rituals of stone in cromlech, pillar, shrine and tower, temples and tombs. The written word, or literature, comes last, the fullest and highest expression of the intellect and culture, and scientific progress of a nation. The Irish race were never much indebted to the written word. The learned class, the ollamhs, dwelt apart and kept their knowledge sacred. The people therefore lived entirely upon the traditions of their forefathers, blended with the new doctrines taught by Christianity; so that the popular belief became, in time, an amalgam of the pagan myths and the Christian legend, and these two elements remain indissolubly united to this day. The world, in fact, is a volume, a serial rather, going on for six thousand years, but of which the Irish peasant has scarcely yet turned the first page.