Love from Nancy

Author: Nancy Mitford

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 538

View: 856


Presents a collection of letters to Evelyn Waugh, Harold Acton, Christopher Sykes, Robert Byron, and other notable correspondents

Women’s Writing, Englishness and National and Cultural Identity

Author: M. Joannou

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137265299

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 7899


An original mapping of women's writing in the 1940s and 1950s, this book looks at Englishness and national identity in women's writing and includes writing from Scotland, Wales, Ireland the Indian subcontinent and Africa. The authors discussed include Virginia Woolf, Daphne Du Maurier, Doris Lessing and Muriel Spark.

Diplomacy and the Modern Novel

Author: Isabelle Daunais,Allan Hepburn

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487508093

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 4050


Why have so many diplomats been writers? Why have so many writers served as diplomats? This book provides some fascinating insights into the connections between literature and diplomacy.

The Mitford Girls

Author: Mary S. Lovell

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0748109218

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 624

View: 5378


'A cracking read ' Lynn Barber, Observer The Mitford Girls tells the true story behind the gaiety and frivolity of the six Mitford daughters - and the facts are as sensational as any novel: Nancy, whose bright social existence masked an obsessional doomed love which soured her success; Pam, a countrywoman married to one of the best brains in Europe; Diana, an iconic beauty, who was already married when at 22 she fell in love with Oswald Moseley, the leader of the British fascists; Unity, who romantically in love with Hitler, became a member of his inner circle before shooting herself in the temple when WWII was declared; Jessica, the family rebel, who declared herself a communist in the schoolroom and the youngest sister, Debo, who became the Duchess of Devonshire. This is an extraordinary story of an extraordinary family, containing much new material, based on exclusive access to Mitford archives.

Churchill's Rebels

Author: Meredith Whitford

Publisher: Birlinn Ltd

ISBN: 1910074349

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 7055


Churchill’s Rebels is a heart-braking story of two young people madly in love and in open rebellion against their up-bringing and a way of life. Esmond Romilly was the nephew of Winston Churchill, a rebel against his family and public school who left England to fight for the rebels in the Spanish Civil War. Jessica Mitford, was one of the notorious Mitford girls – always known as Decca – and grew up in a life of Downton Abbey aristocratic privilege. Her sister Unity went to Germany and became very close to Hitler, while Diana married Sir Oswald Mosley, the leader of the British Union of Fascists. In 1937, when Esmond was 18 and Jessica 19 they met and fell madly in love and, scandalously, ran away together to the Communist Front in Spain. After three months of family opposition, they were finally married. With war ever approaching, Esmond trained to fly and was killed in active service with Bomber Command. They had only had four brief, tempestuous and loving years together. Meredith Whitford’s ground-breaking book uses previous unpublished documents and family sources and is essential reading. A distinguished author, she tells the story of a remarkable era...

The Sisters: The Saga of the Mitford Family

Author: Mary S. Lovell

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393076103

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 640

View: 9175


"Fascinating, the way all great family stories are fascinating."—Robert Gottlieb, New York Times Book Review This is the story of a close, loving family splintered by the violent ideologies of Europe between the world wars. Jessica was a Communist; Debo became the Duchess of Devonshire; Nancy was one of the best-selling novelists of her day; beautiful Diana married the Fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley; and Unity, a close friend of Hitler, shot herself in the head when England and Germany declared war. The Mitfords had style and presence and were mercilessly gifted. Above all, they were funny—hilariously and mercilessly so. In this wise, evenhanded, and generous book, Mary Lovell captures the vitality and drama of a family that took the twentieth century by storm and became, in some respects, its victims.

The Bookshop at 10 Curzon Street

Author: John Saumarez Smith

Publisher: Quarto Publishing Group USA

ISBN: 178101163X

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 1167


Nancy Mitford was a brilliant personality, a remarkable novelist and a legendary letter writer. It is not widely known that she was also a bookseller. From 1942 to 1946 she worked in Heywood Hill's famous shop in Curzon Street, and effectively ran it when the male staff were called up for war service. After the war she left to live in France, but she maintained an abiding interest in the shop, its stock, and the many and varied customers who themselves form a cavalcade of the literary stars of post-war Britain. Her letters to Heywood Hill advise on recent French titles that might appeal to him and his customers, gossip engagingly about life in Paris, and enquire anxiously about the reception of her own books, while seeking advice about new titles to read. In return Heywood kept her up to date with customers and their foibles, and with aspects of literary and bookish life in London. Charming, witty, utterly irresistible, the correspondence gives brilliant insights into a world that has almost disappeared.

Bright Young People

Author: D J Taylor

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1409020630

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 891


Bright Young People/ Making the most of our youth/ They talk in the Press of our social success/ But quite the reverse is the truth. [Noel Coward] The Bright Young People were one of the most extraordinary youth cults in British history. A pleasure-seeking band of bohemian party-givers and blue-blooded socialites, they romped through the 1920s gossip columns. Evelyn Waugh dramatised their antics in Vile Bodies and many of them, such as Anthony Powell, Nancy Mitford,Cecil Beaton and John Betjeman, later became household names. Their dealings with the media foreshadowed our modern celebrity culture and even today,we can detect their influence in our cultural life. But the quest for pleasure came at a price. Beneath the parties and practical jokes was a tormented generation, brought up in the shadow of war, whose relationships - with their parents and with each other - were prone to fracture. For many, their progress through the 'serious' Thirties, when the age of parties was over and another war hung over the horizon, led only to drink, drugs and disappointment, and in the case of Elizabeth Ponsonby - whose story forms a central strand of this book - to a family torn apart by tragedy. Moving from the Great War to the Blitz, Bright Young People is both a chronicle of England's 'lost generation' of the Jazz Age, and a panoramic portrait of a world that could accommodate both dizzying success and paralysing failure. Drawing on the writings and reminiscences of the Bright Young People themselves, D.J. Taylor has produced an enthralling social and cultural history, a definitive portrait of a vanished age.

She Who Dares

Author: Lyndsy Spence

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750991704

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 3044


HISTORY has seen many women make their mark by defying the limits set against them, stepping out of the boxes they had been put in and forging their own path. She Who Dares is a collection of pen portraits of ten extraordinary women who dared to defy the norm. They were often witnesses to or participants in key events in the last 100 years, including abdications, the rise of fascism and two world wars. Their lives were dramatic and vibrant, usually involving tangled webs of relationships, heartbreak and scandal. From influencing politics to being accused of witchcraft, from glamorous society beauties to nonconformist tom-boys, each of these women deserves to be described as trailblazing.