Mark of the Lion: the Story of Charles Upham VC & Bar

Author: Kenneth Sandford

Publisher: Penguin Random House New Zealand Limited

ISBN: 1742287026

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 6707


Charles Upham was the great New Zealand war hero. He was one of the few people in history to have won the Victoria Cross twice, setting new standards of personal heroism during World War II. A quietly spoken sheep farmer back home in Canterbury, at the front in Crete and North Africa he destroyed enemy machinegun posts single-handed and led a frontal assault on enemy guns. His exploits and individual heroism are the stuff of Kiwi legend. He then spent the rest of the war in prisoner-of-war camps, including the famous Colditz Castle, where he made life a misery for the German guards, constantly trying to escape. This bestselling book was first published by Hutchinson in Britain in 1962 and reprinted many times. It has become a classic. In a new Afterword written for this edition, Bruce Wallace, author of Battle of the Titans, describes Upham's life following the war until his death in 1994. Also available as an eBook

Mark of the Lion

Author: Kenneth Leslie Sandford

Publisher: Penguin Group

ISBN: 9780143018643

Category: Soldiers

Page: 290

View: 7448


Charles Upham was the great New Zealand war hero. He was one of the few people in history to have won the Victoria Cross twice, setting new standards of personal heroism during World War II.

World War II: The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection [5 volumes]

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1851099697

Category: History

Page: 2471

View: 9072


With more than 1,700 cross-referenced entries covering every aspect of World War II, the events and developments of the era, and myriad related subjects as well as a documents volume, this is the most comprehensive reference work available on the war. • Provides a clear understanding of the causes of World War II, reaching back to World War I and the role of the Western democracies in its origin • Examines home front developments in major countries during the war, such as race and gender relations in the United States • Recognizes the important roles played by women in the war and describes how the United States mobilized its economy and citizenry for total war • Discusses the Holocaust and establishes responsibility for this genocide • Details the changing attitudes toward the war as expressed in film and literature

VCs of the North

Author: Alan Whitworth

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473848229

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 6322


Today the Victoria Cross remains the supreme British award for bravery. It takes precedence over all other awards and decorations. During its 160-year history, since the first medals were given for gallantry during the Crimean War in the 1850s, 1,357 of these medals have been won, and almost fifty of them have gone to the soldiers of Cumbria, Durham and Northumberland . Alan Whitworth, in this carefully researched and revealing account, describes in graphic detail the exploits and the lives of this elite band of heroes. Within this group of Northern VC recipients are a number of outstanding names, including Richard Annand who gained the first VC of the Second World War and Roland Bradford who was one of only four sets of brothers to have secured the VC. He also had the distinction of becoming the youngest general in the British army. But among the roll of the brave whose gallantry and self-sacrifice are celebrated in these pages the reader will find the names and extraordinary deeds of many other men who were either born or bred or lived and died in the North. They will also find the story of the youngest Victoria Cross recipient who won his award aged just nineteen. The stories of these ordinary individuals who have 'performed some signal act of valour or devotion to their country' will be fascinating reading for anyone who is interested in military history in general and in the long military tradition of the North of England.

World War II in Literature for Youth

Author: Patricia Hachten Wee,Robert James Wee

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 9780810853010

Category: Education

Page: 391

View: 8730


This comprehensive volume provides a wealth of information with annotated listings of more than 3,500 titles—a broad sampling of books on the war years 1939-1945. Includes both fiction and nonfiction works about all aspects of the war. Professional resources for educators aligned to the educational standards for social studies; technical references; periodicals and electronic resources; a directory of WWII museums, memorials, and other institutions; and topics for exploration complement this excellent library and classroom resource.

The New Zealand Expeditionary Force in World War II

Author: Wayne Stack,Barry O’Sullivan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 178096112X

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 6510


In 1939 more than 140,000 New Zealanders enlisted to fight overseas during World War II. Of these, 104,000 served in the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force. Initially thrown into the doomed campaign to halt the German blitzkrieg on Greece and Crete (1941), the division was rebuilt under the leadership of MajGen Sir Bernard Freyberg, and became the elite corps within Montgomery's Eighth Army in the desert. After playing a vital role in the victory at El Alamein (1942) the 'Kiwis' were the vanguard of the pursuit to Tunisia. In 1943–45 the division was heavily engaged in the Italian mountains, especially at Cassino (1944); it ended the war in Trieste. Meanwhile, a smaller NZ force supported US forces against the Japanese in the Solomons and New Guinea (1942–44). Fully illustrated with specially commissioned colour plates, this is the story of the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force's vital contribution to Allied victory in World War II.

A Job to Do

Author: John Gordon

Publisher: Exisle Publishing

ISBN: 1775591980

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 787


What was it really like for the soldiers of 2 New Zealand Division in World War Two? How did they spend their time and how did they see their lives as servicemen, from training at home and sailing off to war, to setting up camp, relaxing off -duty, fighting in hostile environments and possibly being taken prisoner? This anthology is a personal selection of material describing the experiences of these men, almost all written from within its ranks. Colloquially known to its members as ‘The Div’, it was by far the major part of New Zealand’s Second Expeditionary Force, making it our main contribution to the war. Naturally it had a distinctly New Zealand character, and despite being caught in several difficult situations in its early years – and not necessarily of its own doing – it gained an international reputation for courage, reliability and achievement. In this book John Gordon presents a lively and illuminating selection of the published words of members of ‘The Div’ or those with close associations. The chosen extracts are drawn from memoirs, fiction, verse, news reports and magazine articles penned by soldiers of all ranks. The result is a compilation of the written views and experiences of over 80 insiders, creating an intimate glimpse of life and war within ‘The Div’, supported by a host of photographs and cartoons from the period. From the declaration of war to the return home, this is a sample of the experiences of well over 100,000 New Zealand men who served in the division: how they coped with discipline and disaster, sacrifice and success. They write with the same frankness, humour, wry cynicism and understatement that they used to cope with the challenges of their war.