The Social Scientific Study of Jewry

Author: Uzi Rebhun

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199363498

Category: Religion

Page: 371

View: 9662


"The Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem."

Disaster Drawn

Author: Hillary L. Chute

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674495667

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 371

View: 2921


In hard-hitting accounts of Auschwitz, Bosnia, Palestine, and Hiroshima’s Ground Zero, comics have shown a stunning capacity to bear witness to trauma. Hillary Chute explores the ways graphic narratives by diverse artists, including Jacques Callot, Francisco Goya, Keiji Nakazawa, Art Spiegelman, and Joe Sacco, document the disasters of war.

From Text to Epitext: Expanding Students' Comprehension, Engagement, and Media Literacy

Author: Shelbie Witte,Melissa Gross,Don Latham

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440877505

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 200

View: 4216


This volume explains how analyzing textual elements that aren't part of the text but connected to it can be used with K–16 students to improve comprehension, engagement, critical thinking, and media literacy. Beginning with an introduction that briefly explains Genette's theory of paratext and discusses the functions of epitext theory, this book comprises theory-to-practice chapters that showcase ways in which teachers and librarians can use elements independent of a text to discuss texts and media with students. Chapters include a practitioner's section specifying practical approaches and explanations for how to use epitext. Scaffolding an application of theory to practice, this title provides educators with an original approach to increasing literacy engagement and integration as well as for increasing media literacy and critical thinking. It includes practical ideas for using epitext in the classroom to promote critical thinking and for collaboration between teachers and librarians. It also includes editorial sidebars that provide additional "how-to" ideas, support deep thinking, make connections to relevant content in other chapters, and provide examples for students in K–16 classrooms. Explains how epitext can be used to scaffold understanding by providing summaries of content, interpretations, criticisms, and appreciations others share about the work Demonstrates the creative process by following the trail of the production of a work Helps students to explore and use various media to complement and extend their experience of a work

Beyond Postmodernism

Author: Christopher K. Brooks

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443863580

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 195

View: 7791


Beyond Postmodernism: Onto the Postcontemporary is a collection designed to provide the reader with an alternative to viewing the world through the lens of Postmodernism. Contributors to this collection utilize and define such critical tools as transhumanism, post-post theory, posthumanism, and postcontemporary theory. Other essays focus on interpreting texts or genres, yielding impressive conclusions that were “beyond” the scope of postmodern discourse. Eclectic in nature, while examining works as diverse as Julia Ward Howe’s The Hermaphrodite and Salman Rushdie’s Satanic Verses, yet unified in a commonsensical statement that postmodernism has perhaps ruled too long in critical discussions, this collection is also designed to attract those seeking or awaiting something new in critical methodology to consider joining in the postcontemporary dialogue.

Graphic Novels as Philosophy

Author: Jeff McLaughlin

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496813286

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 4150


Contributions by Eric Bain-Selbo, Jeremy Barris, Maria Botero, Manuel "Mandel" Cabrera Jr., David J. Leichter, Ian MacRae, Alfonso Munoz-Corcuera, Corry Shores, and Jarkko S. Tuusvuori In a follow-up to Comics as Philosophy, international contributors address two questions: Which philosophical insights, concepts, and tools can shed light on the graphic novel? And how can the graphic novel cast light on the concerns of philosophy? Each contributor ponders a well-known graphic novel to illuminate ways in which philosophy can untangle particular combinations of image and written word for deeper understanding. Jeff McLaughlin collects a range of essays to examine notable graphic novels within the framework posited by these two questions. One essay discusses how a philosopher discovered that the panels in Jeff Lemire's Essex County do not just replicate a philosophical argument, but they actually give evidence to an argument that could not have existed otherwise. Another essay reveals how Chris Ware's manipulation of the medium demonstrates an important sense of time and experience. Still another describes why Maus tends to be more profound than later works that address the Holocaust because of, not in spite of, the fact that the characters are cartoon animals rather than human. Other works contemplated include Will Eisner's A Contract with God, Alan Moore and David Lloyd's V for Vendetta, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, and Joe Sacco's Footnotes in Gaza. Mainly, each essay, contributor, graphic novelist, and artist are all doing the same thing: trying to tell us how the world is--at least from their point of view.

Documenting Trauma in Comics

Author: Dominic Davies,Candida Rifkind

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 3030379981

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 345

View: 3882


Why are so many contemporary comics and graphic narratives written as memoirs or documentaries of traumatic events? Is there a specific relationship between the comics form and the documentation and reportage of trauma? How do the interpretive demands made on comics readers shape their relationships with traumatic events? And how does comics’ documentation of traumatic pasts operate across national borders and in different cultural, political, and politicised contexts? The sixteen chapters and three comics included in Documenting Trauma in Comics set out to answer exactly these questions. Drawing on a range of historically and geographically expansive examples, the contributors bring their different perspectives to bear on the tangled and often fraught intersections between trauma studies, comics studies, and theories of documentary practices and processes. The result is a collection that shows how comics is not simply related to trauma, but a generative force that has become central to its remembrance, documentation, and study.

Superman Is Jewish?

Author: Harry Brod

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416595317

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 240

View: 3216


"Harry Brod situates superheroes within the course of Jewish-American history: they are aliens in a foreign land, like Superman; figures plagued by guilt for abandoning their families, like Spider-Man; and outsiders persecuted for being different, like the X-Men. Brod blends humor and sharp observation as he considers the overt and discreet Jewish characteristics of these well-known figures and explores how their creators integrated their Jewish identities and their creativity."--From publisher description.

Visual Peace

Author: Frank Möller

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137020407

Category: Political Science

Page: 274

View: 5575


This book introduces a new research agenda for visual peace research, providing a political analysis of the relationship between visual representations and the politics of violence nationally and internationally. Using a range of genres, from photography to painting, it elaborates on how people can become agents of their own image.

Redrawing the Historical Past

Author: Martha J. Cutter,Cathy J. Schlund-Vials

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820352004

Category: History

Page: 370

View: 9209


Redrawing the Historical Past examines how multiethnic graphic novels portray and revise U.S. history. This is the first collection to focus exclusively on the interplay of history and memory in multiethnic graphic novels. Such interplay enables a new understanding of the past. The twelve essays explore Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece's Incognegro, Gene Luen Yang's Boxers and Saints, GB Tran's Vietnamerica, Scott McCloud's The New Adventures of Abraham Lincoln, Art Spiegelman's post-Maus work, and G. Neri and Randy DuBurke's Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty, among many others. The collection represents an original body of criticism about recently published works that have received scant scholarly attention. The chapters confront issues of history and memory in contemporary multiethnic graphic novels, employing diverse methodologies and approaches while adhering to three main guidelines. First, using a global lens, contributors reconsider the concept of history and how it is manifest in their chosen texts. Second, contributors consider the ways in which graphic novels, as a distinct genre, can formally renovate or intervene in notions of the historical past. Third, contributors take seriously the possibilities and limitations of these historical revisions with regard to envisioning new, different, or even more positive versions of both the present and future. As a whole, the volume demonstrates that graphic novelists use the open and flexible space of the graphic narrative page--in which readers can move not only forward but also backward, upward, downward, and in several other directions--to present history as an open realm of struggle that is continually being revised. Contributors: Frederick Luis Aldama, Julie Buckner Armstrong, Katharine Capshaw, Monica Chiu, Jennifer Glaser, Taylor Hagood, Caroline Kyungah Hong, Angela Lafien, Catherine H. Nguyen, Jeffrey Santa Ana, and Jorge Santos.