Missing

Author: Richard Van Emden

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

ISBN: 9781526761002

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: N.A

View: 792


In May 1918, Angela and Leopold Mond received a knock on the front door. It was the postman and he was delivering the letter every family in the United Kingdom dreaded: the notification of a loved one's battlefield death, in their case the death in action of their eldest child, their son, Lieutenant Francis Mond. The twenty-two year old Royal Flying Corps pilot, along with his Observer, Lieutenant Edgar Martyn, had been shot down over no man's land, both being killed instantly. If there was one crumb of comfort, it was the news that a brave Australian officer, Lieutenant A.H. Hill, had gone out under fire and recovered both bodies: there would, at the very least, be a grave to visit after the war. And then, nothing. No further news was forthcoming. Angela Mond wrote to the Imperial War Graves Commission asking for further details but there was confusion. No one knew where Mond's and Martyn's bodies were buried. There had been an initial trail: both bodies had been taken to the village of Corbie and a lorry summoned to take them away, but from that last sighting both men had simply disappeared. 'It seems incredible that all traces of the burial of two officers duly identified, should be lost, ' wrote Angela to the authorities in December 1918. And so began one of the most extraordinary private investigations undertaken in the aftermath of the Great War. Aged 48 and the mother of five children, Angela, a wealthy and well-connected socialite from London's West End, embarked on an exhaustive personal quest to find her son, an investigation that took her to the battlefields and cemeteries of France and into correspondence with literally hundreds of French civilians and British and German servicemen. In the meantime, as she searched, she bought the ground on which her son's plane had crashed and erected a private memorial to Francis, a memorial that still survives. Angela's quest for her son is reflective of the wider yearning amongst those who lost loved ones in the Great War: the absolute need find a form of solace through the resolution of a search. More than 750,000 servicemen and women had been killed, half of whom had no known grave. After the Great War there were families who hunted for their missing sons for a decade or more and when no body was recovered, back doors were forever left unlocked just in case that son should one day return. Lieutenant Francis Mond's case was exceptional, perhaps unique in the circumstances of his death and subsequent disappearance, but the emotions behind the search for his body were shared by families all over the country.

Reported Missing in the Great War

Author: John Broom

Publisher: Pen and Sword Military

ISBN: 1526749548

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2029


Of the one million British and Empire military personnel who were killed in action; died of wounds, disease, or injury; or were missing presumed dead during the First World War, over half a million have no known grave. Of these, nearly 188,000 are buried anonymously in Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries, with a stone bearing the epitaph ‘Known Unto God.' The remains of a further 339,000 lie scattered across the wartime battlefields, having been buried in marked graves that were subsequently obliterated as front lines moved backwards and forwards, or destroyed forever in the carnage mechanized warfare wrought upon the human body. For the families of those who were reported missing, months of agonizing uncertainty could await, as searches were made to establish the precise fate of their loved ones. Sometimes rumors that an individual was recovering from wounds in a hospital, unable to contact his family, or had been taken prisoner by the enemy could circulate, causing a toxic admixture of hope, tinged with anxiety then dashed by the despair of the confirmation of death. This book traces the history of the searching services that were established to assist families in eliciting definitive news of their missing loved ones. Then, using previously unpublished material, most of it lovingly preserved in family archives for over a century, the lives of eight soldiers, whose families had no known resting place to visit after the conclusion of the war, are recounted. These young men, their lives full of promise, vanished from the face of the earth. The circumstances of their deaths and the painstaking efforts undertaken, both by family members and public and voluntary organizations, to piece together what information could be found are described. The eventual acceptance of the reality of death and the need to properly commemorate the lives of those who would have no marked grave are examined. For three of the eight men, recent discoveries have meant that over a century since they were given up as missing, their remains have been identified and allowed families some degree of closure.

Missing

Author: Richard van Emden

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1526760975

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 312

View: 5419


The story of one British mother’s desperate search for her son’s remains after he was killed in action during World War I. In May, 1918, Angela and Leopold Mond received a knock on the front door. It was the postman delivering the letter every family in the United Kingdom dreaded: the notification of a loved one’s battlefield death—in their case their eldest child, their son, Lieutenant Francis Mond. The Royal Flying Corps pilot, along with his Observer, Lieutenant Edgar Martyn, had been shot down over no man’s land in France, both killed instantly. Yet there was one comfort: both bodies had been recovered. There would, at the very least, be a grave to visit after the war. However, no news followed. Angela Mond wrote to the Imperial War Graves Commission asking for further details, but no one knew where the bodies were buried. There was an initial trail, but from that last sighting both men had simply disappeared. So begins the story detailed in Missing. Angela, a wealthy, well-connected 48-year-old mother of five and a socialite from London’s West End, embarked on an exhaustive quest to find her son that took her to the battlefields and cemeteries of France and into correspondence with hundreds of French civilians and British and German servicemen. She even bought the ground on which her son’s plane had crashed and erected a private memorial to Francis, a memorial that survives to this day. During the Great War, more than 750,000 servicemen and women had been killed. Half of them had no known grave, leaving many families desperate for solace. This is just one of those heartbreaking stories.

The Searchers

Author: Robert Sackville-West

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1526613131

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 3424


Fascinating ... carefully researched and beautifully written' DAVID DIMBLEBY By the end of the First World War, the whereabouts of more than half a million British soldiers were unknown. Most were presumed dead, lost forever under the battlefields of northern France and Flanders. In The Searchers, Robert Sackville-West brings together the extraordinary, moving accounts of those who dedicated their lives to the search for the missing. These stories reveal the remarkable lengths to which people will go to give meaning to their loss: Rudyard Kipling's quest for his son's grave; E.M. Forster's conversations with traumatised soldiers in hospital in Alexandria; desperate attempts to communicate with the spirits of the dead; the campaign to establish the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior; and the exhumation and reburial in military cemeteries of hundreds of thousands of bodies. It was a search that would span a century: from the department set up to investigate the fate of missing comrades in the war's aftermath, to the present day, when DNA profiling continues to aid efforts to recover, identify and honour these men. As the rest of the country found ways to repair and move on, countless families were consumed by this mission, undertaking arduous, often hopeless, journeys to discover what happened to their husbands, brothers and sons. Giving prominence to the deep, personal battles of those left behind, The Searchers brings the legacy of war vividly to life in a testament to the bravery, compassion and resilience of the human spirit.

Conflict Landscapes

Author: Nicholas J. Saunders,Paul Cornish

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1000391280

Category: History

Page: 420

View: 6256


Conflict Landscapes explores the long under-acknowledged and under-investigated aspects of where and how modern conflict landscapes interact and conjoin with pre-twentieth-century places, activities, and beliefs, as well as with individuals and groups. Investigating and understanding the often unpredictable power and legacies of landscapes that have seen (and often still viscerally embody) the consequences of mass death and destruction, the book shows, through these landscapes, the power of destruction to preserve, refocus, and often reconfigure the past. Responding to the complexity of modern conflict, the book offers a coherent, integrated, and sensitized hybrid approach, which calls on different disciplines where they overlap in a shared common terrain. Dealing with issues such as memory, identity, emotion, and wellbeing, the chapters tease out the human experience of modern conflict and its relationship to landscape. Conflict Landscapes will appeal to a wide range of disciplines involved in studying conflict, such as archaeology, anthropology, material culture studies, art history, cultural history, cultural geography, military history, and heritage and museum studies.

Dumfriesshire in the Great War

Author: Timothy McCracken

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473823072

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 8501


In Dumfriesshire, the most striking change during the Great War was to occur around Gretna. Here the largest cordite factory in the UK was established, work commencing on the factory in 1915, with completion in 1916.??Throughout the region the impact of the First World War was felt greatly by the local communities, which were decimated by the losses suffered during the conflict. The huge influx of workers to H.M. Factory Gretna disrupted areas of daily life and caused an increase in crime. The population of Dumfriesshire supported those who directly suffered as a result of the war, in a number of ways, including the production of wound dressings, the provision of auxiliary hospitals and fundraising efforts to provide support to refugees.??Thematic chapters, considering aspects such as recruitment, voluntary medical service and commemoration, illustrate experiences of the Dumfriesshire population, shaped by the First World War.??The book contributes to wider understanding of the impact of the First World War, particularly in rural areas, and as such will be of relevance to readers with an interest in cultural and social history.

Great War, Religious Dimensions

Author: Bobby Wintermute

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108586945

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 7175


The First World War was a transformative event, affecting international culture, economics, and geopolitics. Though often presented as the moment heralding a new secular era of modernity, in actuality the war experience was grounded in religious faith and ritual for many participants. This Element examines how religion was employed by the state to solicit support and civic participation, while also being subordinated to the strategic and operational demands of the combatant armies. Even as religion was employed to express dissent, it was also used as a coercive tool to ensure compliance with the wartime demands of the state on civilians.

Commemorative Modernisms

Author: Alice Kelly

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 1474459927

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 648


This book provides the first sustained study of women's literary representations of death and the culture of war commemoration that underlies British and American literary modernism.

Cold War

Author: James R. Arnold,Roberta Wiener

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610690036

Category: History

Page: 443

View: 9920


Presents alphabeticaly arranged reference entries on the Cold War between the United States and Russia during the late twentieth century, covering its military, social, and political aspects and its impact on other countries in the world.

Complex Injuries of the Hand

Author: Tahseen Cheema

Publisher: JP Medical Ltd

ISBN: 1907816259

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 8338


Guidance on the management of complex hand injuries offering principles and examples for dealing with multiple structural injuries, focussing on the assessment, decision-making, timing and level of surgical intervention.