Moanin' at Midnight

Author: James Segrest,Mark Hoffman

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 0307831019

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 6799


Howlin’ Wolf was a musical giant in every way. He stood six foot three, weighed almost three hundred pounds, wore size sixteen shoes, and poured out his darkest sorrows onstage in a voice like a raging chainsaw. Half a century after his first hits, his sound still terrifies and inspires. Born Chester Burnett in 1910, the Wolf survived a grim childhood and hardscrabble youth as a sharecropper in Mississippi. He began his career playing and singing with the first Delta blues stars for two decades in perilous juke joints. He was present at the birth of rock ’n’ roll in Memphis, where Sam Phillips–who also discovered Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, and Jerry Lee Lewis–called Wolf his “greatest discovery.” He helped develop the sound of electric blues and vied with rival Muddy Waters for the title of king of Chicago blues. He ended his career performing and recording with the world’s most famous rock stars. His passion for music kept him performing–despite devastating physical problems–right up to his death in 1976. There’s never been a comprehensive biography of the Wolf until now. Moanin’ at Midnight is full of startling information about his mysterious early years, surprising and entertaining stories about his decades at the top, and never-before-seen photographs. It strips away all the myths to reveal–at long last–the real-life triumphs and tragedies of this blues titan.

Today's Chicago Blues

Author: Karen Hanson

Publisher: Lake Claremont Press

ISBN: 9781893121195

Category: Music

Page: 238

View: 7318


Profiles dozens of Chicago's blues musicians; discusses the city's blues history; and offers tips on clubs, radio stations, record labels, grave sites, and places of interest to blues fans.

Delta Blues: The Life and Times of the Mississippi Masters Who Revolutionized American Music

Author: Ted Gioia

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393069990

Category: Music

Page: 480

View: 1820


“The essential history of this distinctly American genre.”—Atlanta Journal-Constitution In this “expertly researched, elegantly written, dispassionate yet thoughtful history” (Gary Giddins), award-winning author Ted Gioia gives us “the rare combination of a tome that is both deeply informative and enjoyable to read” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). From the field hollers of nineteenth-century plantations to Muddy Waters and B.B. King, Delta Blues delves into the uneasy mix of race and money at the point where traditional music became commercial and bluesmen found new audiences of thousands. Combining extensive fieldwork, archival research, interviews with living musicians, and first-person accounts with “his own calm, argument-closing incantations to draw a line through a century of Delta blues” (New York Times), this engrossing narrative is flavored with insightful and vivid musical descriptions that ensure “an understanding of not only the musicians, but the music itself” (Boston Sunday Globe). Rooted in the thick-as-tar Delta soil, Delta Blues is already “a contemporary classic in its field” (Jazz Review).

Willie Dixon

Author: Mitsutoshi Inaba

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810869934

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 445

View: 6521


Examines the development of Willie Dixon's career as well as the evolution of his songwriting techniques and skills as a singer, arranger, and producer.

The Black Musician and the White City

Author: Amy Absher

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472119176

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 7261


An exploration of the history of African American musicians in Chicago during the mid-20th century

Crossroads

Author: John Milward

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1555538231

Category: Music

Page: 259

View: 6135


The blues revival of the early 1960s brought new life to a seminal genre of American music and inspired a vast new world of singers, songwriters, and rock bands. The Rolling Stones took their name from a Muddy Waters song; Led Zeppelin forged bluesy riffs into hard rock and heavy metal; and ZZ Top did superstar business with boogie rhythms copped from John Lee Hooker. Crossroads tells the myriad stories of the impact and enduring influence of the early-'60s blues revival: stories of the record collectors, folkies, beatniks, and pop culture academics; and of the lucky musicians who learned life-changing lessons from the rediscovered Depression-era bluesmen that found hipster renown by playing at coffeehouses, on college campuses, and at the Newport Folk Festival. The blues revival brought notice to these forgotten musicians, and none more so than Robert Johnson, who had his songs covered by Cream and the Rolling Stones, and who sold a million CDs sixty years after dying outside a Mississippi Delta roadhouse. Crossroads is the intersection of blues and rock 'n' roll, a vivid portrait of the fluidity of American folk culture that captures the voices of musicians, promoters, fans, and critics to tell this very American story of how the blues came to rest at the heart of popular music.

The Guts

Author: Roddy Doyle

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448182425

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 7249


Longlisted for the 2015 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award Jimmy Rabbitte is back. The man who invented the Commitments back in the eighties is now forty-seven, with a loving wife, four kids ... and bowel cancer. He isn’t dying, he thinks, but he might be. Jimmy still loves his music, and he still loves to hustle. On his path through Dublin he meets two of the Commitments – Outspan, whose own illness is probably terminal, and Imelda Quirk, still as gorgeous as ever. This warm, funny novel is about friendship and family, about facing death and opting for life. Includes the short story Jimmy Jazz

Chicago's Most Wanted

Author: Laura Enright

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1612340342

Category: Chicago (Ill.)

Page: 409

View: 1165


One book that OC wonOCOt let you downOCO"

Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll

Author: Peter Guralnick

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0316341843

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 784

View: 9049


From the author of the critically acclaimed Elvis Presley biography: Last Train to Memphis brings us the life of Sam Phillips, the visionary genius who singlehandedly steered the revolutionary path of Sun Records. The music that he shaped in his tiny Memphis studio with artists as diverse as Elvis Presley, Ike Turner, Howlin' Wolf, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Johnny Cash, introduced a sound that had never been heard before. He brought forth a singular mix of black and white voices passionately proclaiming the vitality of the American vernacular tradition while at the same time declaring, once and for all, a new, integrated musical day. With extensive interviews and firsthand personal observations extending over a 25-year period with Phillips, along with wide-ranging interviews with nearly all the legendary Sun Records artists, Guralnick gives us an ardent, unrestrained portrait of an American original as compelling in his own right as Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, or Thomas Edison.