Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Author: Frederick Douglass,Harriet Jacobs

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 9780679783282

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 7751


Introduction by Kwame Anthony Appiah Commentary by Jean Fagan Yellin and Margaret Fuller This Modern Library edition combines two of the most important African American slave narratives—crucial works that each illuminate and inform the other. Frederick Douglass’s Narrative, first published in 1845, is an enlightening and incendiary text. Born into slavery, Douglass became the preeminent spokesman for his people during his life; his narrative is an unparalleled account of the dehumanizing effects of slavery and Douglass’s own triumph over it. Like Douglass, Harriet Jacobs was born into slavery, and in 1861 she published Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, now recognized as the most comprehensive antebellum slave narrative written by a woman. Jacobs’s account broke the silence on the exploitation of African American female slaves, and it remains essential reading. Includes a Modern Library Reading Group Guide

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave & Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Author: Frederick Douglass,Harriet Jacobs

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 0345478231

Category: Social Science

Page: 0

View: 8916


This Modern Library Paperback Classics edition combines the two most important African American slave narratives into one volume. Frederick Douglass's Narrative, first published in 1845, is an enlightening and incendiary text. Born into slavery, Douglass became the preeminent spokesman for his people during his life; his narrative is an unparalleled account of the dehumanizing effects of slavery and Douglass's own triumph over it. Like Douglass, Harriet Jacobs was born into slavery, and in 1861 she published Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, now recognized as the most comprehensive antebellum slave narrative written by a woman. Jacobs's account broke the silence on the exploitation of African American female slaves, and it remains crucial reading. These narratives illuminate and inform each other. This edition includes an incisive Introduction by Kwame Anthony Appiah and extensive annotations.

Feminism in Slave Narratives

Author: Franziska Scholz

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3640477243

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 12

View: 9031


Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,7, University of Cologne (Englisches Seminar), course: African American Literature, language: English, abstract: The content of this paper deals with the experiences of American slaves out of a male and a female perspective to outline the relevance of feminism in anti-slavery literature. The first chapter gives an insight into the characteristics of slave narratives such as style, structure, themes and aims. Slave narratives are a product of abolitionism, but the aim of this paper is to show feministic influences as well, as the second chapter illustrates. By comparing the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass an American Slave, written by himself with Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl I want to show that the motifs for escape out of slavery are connected to very different factors for a slave woman compared to those of a slave man. Both Douglass and Jacobs suffer from the prevailing system of slavery, but Jacobs’ female point-of-view adds the suffrage from patriarchy as well. Finally I am going to follow the question why Douglass’ narrative gained more success in the 19th century than Jacobs’ narrative, although both stories deal with antislavery, oppression and the struggle for freedom.

Harriet Jacobs’s "Incidents In the Life of a Slave Girl" and Frederick Douglass’ "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass's, an American Slave"

Author: Markus Bulgrin

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638866467

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 22

View: 8805


Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,3, University of Heidelberg (Anglistisches Seminar), course: PSII: Captivity Narratives, 19 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Besides the virtual extermination of the native Indian population it is the brutal and dreadful treatment of Afro-American slaves in the 19th century which depicts some of the darkest and saddest chapters in the history of the United States. Still today the vestiges of slavery can be felt. Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) and Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) are two autobiographies, written by two former slaves, who succeeded in escaping slavery and all its inexpressible cruelties. They are considered two of the most influential, and groundbreaking works of the Antebellum Period, which bear witness to slavery in the United States. These two narratives “that have become twin classics in African American literature course” (cf. Boesenberg 1999: 121), shall be compared, discussed and analysed in this paper. However, Boesenberg’s classification of the texts as “twin classics” could be misread and give rise to misinterpretation, as it may not be the most fitting term. Twins are widely thought of being almost the same. One might argue that this is not entirely true for Jacobs’s and Douglass’s narratives. The aim of this paper will be to point out some crucial similarities and differences between Douglass’s and Jacobs’s autobiographies. The first part of the paper briefly introduces some important similarities of the two narratives. In a second part focus will be given to distinctive features of these texts: family ties, gender difference, sexual exploitation, and manhood and womanhood. In a third part the motif of literacy and its meaning for the author’s liberation will be discussed. The conclusion summarizes the preceded chapters and critically disputes Boesenberg’s statement of the twin classics.

Between the Novel and the News

Author: Sari Edelstein

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813935911

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 9482


While American literary history has long acknowledged the profound influence of journalism on canonical male writers, Sari Edelstein argues that American women writers were also influenced by a dynamic relationship with the mainstream press. From the early republic through the turn of the twentieth century, she offers a comprehensive reassessment of writers such as Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Harriet Jacobs, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Drawing on slave narratives, sentimental novels, and realist fiction, Edelstein examines how advances in journalism—including the emergence of the penny press, the rise of the story-paper, and the birth of eyewitness reportage—shaped not only a female literary tradition but also gender conventions themselves. Excluded from formal politics and lacking the vote, women writers were deft analysts of the prevalent tropes and aesthetic gestures of journalism, which they alternately relied upon and resisted in their efforts to influence public opinion and to intervene in political debates. Ultimately, Between the Novel and the News is a project of recovery that transforms our understanding of the genesis and the development of American women’s writing.

Twin Classics in African American Literature? Harriet Jacobs's 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl' and Frederick Douglass's 'Narrative of the Life

Author: Markus Bulgrin

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 363886653X

Category:

Page: 53

View: 7249


Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,3, University of Heidelberg (Anglistisches Seminar), course: PSII: Captivity Narratives, 19 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Besides the virtual extermination of the native Indian population it is the brutal and dreadful treatment of Afro-American slaves in the 19th century which depicts some of the darkest and saddest chapters in the history of the United States. Still today the vestiges of slavery can be felt. Frederick Douglass's Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845) and Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) are two autobiographies, written by two former slaves, who succeeded in escaping slavery and all its inexpressible cruelties. They are considered two of the most influential, and groundbreaking works of the Antebellum Period, which bear witness to slavery in the United States. These two narratives "that have become twin classics in African American literature course" (cf. Boesenberg 1999: 121), shall be compared, discussed and analysed in this paper. However, Boesenberg's classification of the texts as "twin classics" could be misread and give rise to misinterpretation, as it may not be the most fitting term. Twins are widely thought of being almost the same. One might argue that this is not entirely true for Jacobs's and Douglass's narratives. The aim of this paper will be to point out some crucial similarities and differences between Douglass's and Jacobs's autobiographies. The first part of the paper briefly introduces some important similarities of the two narratives. In a second part focus will be given to distinctive features of these texts: family ties, gender difference, sexual exploitation, and manhood and womanhood. In a third part the motif of literacy and its meaning for the author's liberation will be discussed. The conclusion summar

The Oxford Handbook of the African American Slave Narrative

Author: John Ernest

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199875685

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 496

View: 8868


Given the rise of new interdisciplinary and methodological approaches to African American and Black Atlantic studies, The Oxford Handbook of the African American Slave Narrative will offer a fresh, wide-ranging assessment of this major American literary genre. The volume will begin with articles that consider the fundamental concerns of gender, sexuality, community, and the Christian ethos of suffering and redemption that are central to any understanding of slave narratives. The chapters that follow will interrogate the various agendas behind the production of both pre- and post-Emancipation narratives and take up the various interpretive problems they pose. Strategic omissions and veiled gestures were often necessary in these life accounts as they revealed disturbing, too-painful truths, far beyond what white audiences were prepared to hear. While touching upon the familiar canonical autobiographies of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, the Handbook will pay more attention to the under-studied narratives of Josiah Henson, Sojourner Truth, William Grimes, Henry Box Brown, and other often-overlooked accounts. In addition to the literary autobiographies of bondage, the volume will anatomize the powerful WPA recordings of interviews with former slaves during the late 1930s. With essays on the genre's imaginative afterlife, its final essays will chart the emergence and development of neoslave narratives, most notably in Styron's The Confessions of Nat Turner, Toni Morrisons's Beloved and Octavia Butler's provocative science fiction novel, Kindred. In short, the Handbook will provide a long-overdue assessment of the state of the genre and the vital scholarship that continues to grow around it, work that is offering some of the most provocative analysis emerging out of the literary studies discipline as a whole.

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Author: Harriet Jacobs

Publisher: Lindhardt og Ringhof

ISBN: 8728171748

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 260

View: 1450


For those interested in the abolition of slavery and the Slavery Act in America, 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl' is an autobiography by Harriet Ann Jacobs, a mother and fugitive slave. The book covers Jacobs' life as a slave and how she fought for freedom for herself and her children. With deep historical prominence, the autobiography covers the struggles she faced, including the sexual abuse that female slaves had to endure. Published in 1861 and filled with accounts of heroism and courage, 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl' will leave you shocked and brimming with admiration for Harriet Jacobs. This is perfect for fans of Fredrick Douglass' memoir 'Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave'. Harriet Ann Jacobs was an African-American writer, whose autobiography, 'Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl', is now considered an important American classic. Born into slavery in North Carolina, Jacobs was sexually harassed by her enslaver and when he threatened to sell her children if she didn't allow him to abuse her, she hid in a tiny gap under the roof of her grandmother's house for seven years. She finally managed to escape to the free North where she was reunited with her two children and her brother. During the Civil War, she went to the Union-occupied parts of the South with her daughter and founded two schools for fugitive and freed slaves. They kept boarding houses together until 1887-88, when Harriet became too ill to continue. She died in 1897 in Washington D.C.

Yellow Wife

Author: Sadeqa Johnson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1982149124

Category: Fiction

Page: 288

View: 3990


A Best Book of the Year by NPR and Christian Science Monitor Called “wholly engrossing” by New York Times bestselling author Kathleen Grissom, this “fully immersive” (Lisa Wingate, #1 bestselling author of Before We Were Yours) story follows an enslaved woman forced to barter love and freedom while living in the most infamous slave jail in Virginia. Born on a plantation in Charles City, Virginia, Pheby Delores Brown has lived a relatively sheltered life. Shielded by her mother’s position as the estate’s medicine woman and cherished by the Master’s sister, she is set apart from the others on the plantation, belonging to neither world. She’d been promised freedom on her eighteenth birthday, but instead of the idyllic life she imagined with her true love, Essex Henry, Pheby is forced to leave the only home she has ever known. She unexpectedly finds herself thrust into the bowels of slavery at the infamous Devil’s Half Acre, a jail in Richmond, Virginia, where the enslaved are broken, tortured, and sold every day. There, Pheby is exposed not just to her Jailer’s cruelty but also to his contradictions. To survive, Pheby will have to outwit him, and she soon faces the ultimate sacrifice.