Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me

Author: Harvey Pekar

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 9780809074044

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 176

View: 6052


In Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me, one of the final graphic memoirs from the man who defined the genre, Harvey Pekar explores what it means to be Jewish and what Israel means to the Jews. Pekar’s mother was a Zionist by way of politics, his father by way of faith, and he inevitably grew up a staunch supporter of Israel. But as he became attuned to the wider world, Pekar began to question his parents’ most fundamental beliefs. This book is the full account of that questioning. Over the course of a single day in his hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, Pekar and the illustrator JT Waldman wrestle with the mythologies passed down to them, weaving a personal and historical odyssey of uncommon wit and power. With an epilogue written by Joyce Brabner, Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me is an es- sential book for fans of Harvey Pekar and anyone interested in the past and future of the Jewish state.

The Beats

Author: Harvey Pekar,Ed Piskor

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0809016494

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 199

View: 4388


A tour of America's underground literary movement, presented in a graphic tale format, includes coverage of the Benzedrine-fueled antics of Jack Kerouac, Chicago's beatnik bistro, and San Francisco's City Lights bookstore.

Students for a Democratic Society

Author: Harvey Pekar

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: N.A

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 214

View: 6514


Created in the form of a graphic novel, an illustrated history of the Students for a Democratic Society organization details the 1962 convention during which the group prepared the Port Huron Statement, drafted by Tom Haden, its role during the tumultuous era of the 1960s, and its final meeting in 1969 during which the SDS was shattered into myriad factions.

Graphic History

Author: Richard Iadonisi

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 144384358X

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 295

View: 9295


When it comes to recounting history, issues arise as to whose stories are told and how reliable is the telling. This collection of fourteen essays explores the unique ways in which graphic novels can aid us in addressing those issues while shedding new light on a variety of texts, including those by canonical North American and European writers Art Spiegelman (Maus, In the Shadow of No Towers), Alan Moore (From Hell, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen), Frank Miller (The Dark Knight Returns), Chris Ware (Jimmy Corrigan), Chester Brown (Louis Riel), and Harvey Pekar. Recognizing the global appeal of graphic novels, this collection also provides a fresh look at history seen through the eyes of canonical non-Western writers Marjane Starapi (Persepolis) and Yoshihiro Tatsumi (A Drifting Life) and the highly vexed relationship of the West and the Middle East. The array of contributors (from the fields of art, literature, history, and cultural studies) is matched by the array of theoretical perspectives and by the depth and breadth of subjects, ranging from the sixteenth century voyages of Sebastian Cabot to Jack the Ripper, from the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 to lynching in the early twentieth-century American South, and from post-war Japan to the fall of the Shah in Iran.

The Canada-Israel Nexus

Author: Eric Walberg

Publisher: SCB Distributors

ISBN: 0998694703

Category: Political Science

Page: 372

View: 4366


The Canada-Israel Nexus is a comparative political history of two settler nations, their colonial past, their relations with the indigenous peoples on whose territories they created and imposed new states, and their close linkages to former and current imperial powers. The battle for justice in the Middle East involves treachery, terrorism, exile, apostasy, and, yes, conspiracy. It is the stuff of legend, of which Canada, Israel, and their relationship is a crucial part. The conflict of interests and rights between the colonizer and the colonized is central to this narrative, as is the relationship between Jews and the state in history, and how that relationship was transformed by the creation of a Jewish state.The history of Israel-Palestine is like an accelerated version of Canadia’s dispossession of native peoples, though with differing endgames: ethnic cleansing vs. forced assimilation. Canada is Israel’s ‘best friend’ — not just in former Conservative prime minister Harper’s words, or when a youthful Lester Pearson pushed through the plan for a separate Jewish state, leading to Israel’s creation and his own Nobel Peace prize — but in many little known and unexpected ways. On the other hand, Canadians have numbered among the few daring questioners of the Holocaust, for which they have paid dearly. Not least, this book examines the central question of the identity of Jews in Canada: will they be just that, with a primal loyalty to an Israeli homeland, or will they become Jewish Canadians, even anti-Zionist Canadians, melting easily into Canadian popular culture, itself replete with the influence of Jewish east European Yiddishkeit

Re-Constructing the Man of Steel

Author: Martin Lund

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319429604

Category: Social Science

Page: 215

View: 5351


In this book, Martin Lund challenges contemporary claims about the original Superman’s supposed Jewishness and offers a critical re-reading of the earliest Superman comics. Engaging in critical dialogue with extant writing on the subject, Lund argues that much of recent popular and scholarly writing on Superman as a Jewish character is a product of the ethnic revival, rather than critical investigations of the past, and as such does not stand up to historical scrutiny. In place of these readings, this book offers a new understanding of the Superman created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in the mid-1930s, presenting him as an authentically Jewish American character in his own time, for good and ill. On the way to this conclusion, this book questions many popular claims about Superman, including that he is a golem, a Moses-figure, or has a Hebrew name. In place of such notions, Lund offers contextual readings of Superman as he first appeared, touching on, among other ideas, Jewish American affinities with the Roosevelt White House, the whitening effects of popular culture, Jewish gender stereotypes, and the struggles faced by Jewish Americans during the historical peak of American anti-Semitism. In this book, Lund makes a call to stem the diffusion of myth into accepted truth, stressing the importance of contextualizing the Jewish heritage of the creators of Superman. By critically taking into account historical understandings of Jewishness and the comics’ creative contexts, this book challenges reigning assumptions about Superman and other superheroes’ cultural roles, not only for the benefit of Jewish studies, but for American, Cultural, and Comics studies as a whole.

The Quest for Jewish Belief and Identity in the Graphic Novel

Author: Stephen E. Tabachnick

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817318216

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 6682


Many Jewish artists and writers contributed to the creation of popular comics and graphic novels, and in The Quest for Jewish Belief and Identity in the Graphic Novel, Stephen E. Tabachnick takes readers on an engaging tour of graphic novels that explore themes of Jewish identity and belief. The creators of Superman (Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster), Batman (Bob Kane and Bill Finger), and the Marvel superheroes (Stan Lee and Jack Kirby), were Jewish, as was the founding editor of Mad magazine (Harvey Kurtzman). They often adapted Jewish folktales (like the Golem) or religious stories (such as the origin of Moses) for their comics, depicting characters wrestling with supernatural people and events. Likewise, some of the most significant graphic novels by Jews or about Jewish subject matter deal with questions of religious belief and Jewish identity. Their characters wrestle with belief—or nonbelief—in God, as well as with their own relationship to the Jews, the historical role of the Jewish people, the politics of Israel, and other issues related to Jewish identity. In The Quest for Jewish Belief and Identity in the Graphic Novel, Stephen E. Tabachnick delves into the vivid kaleidoscope of Jewish beliefs and identities, ranging from Orthodox belief to complete atheism, and a spectrum of feelings about identification with other Jews. He explores graphic novels at the highest echelon of the genre by more than thirty artists and writers, among them Harvey Pekar (American Splendor), Will Eisner (A Contract with God), Joann Sfar (The Rabbi’s Cat), Miriam Katin (We Are On Our Own), Art Spiegelman (Maus), J. T. Waldman (Megillat Esther), Aline Kominsky Crumb (Need More Love), James Sturm (The Golem’s Mighty Swing), Leela Corman (Unterzakhn), Ari Folman and David Polonsky (Waltz with Bashir), David Mairowitz and Robert Crumb’s biography of Kafka, and many more. He also examines the work of a select few non-Jewish artists, such as Robert Crumb and Basil Wolverton, both of whom have created graphic adaptations of parts of the Hebrew Bible. Among the topics he discusses are graphic novel adaptations of the Bible; the Holocaust graphic novel; graphic novels about the Jews in Eastern and Western Europe and Africa, and the American Jewish immigrant experience; graphic novels about the lives of Jewish women; the Israel-centered graphic novel; and the Orthodox graphic novel. The book concludes with an extensive bibliography. No study of Jewish literature and art today can be complete without a survey of the graphic novel, and scholars, students, and graphic novel fans alike will delight in Tabachnick’s guide to this world of thought, sensibility, and artfulness.

Teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict

Author: Rachel S. Harris

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 0814346782

Category: Education

Page: 434

View: 4743


Pedagogical resource to help faculty prepare courses on the Arab-Israeli conflict in any discipline.

"How Come Boys Get to Keep Their Noses?"

Author: Tahneer Oksman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231540787

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 4895


American comics reflect the distinct sensibilities and experiences of the Jewish American men who played an outsized role in creating them, but what about the contributions of Jewish women? Focusing on the visionary work of seven contemporary female Jewish cartoonists, Tahneer Oksman draws a remarkable connection between innovations in modes of graphic storytelling and the unstable, contradictory, and ambiguous figurations of the Jewish self in the postmodern era. Oksman isolates the dynamic Jewishness that connects each frame in the autobiographical comics of Aline Kominsky Crumb, Vanessa Davis, Miss Lasko-Gross, Lauren Weinstein, Sarah Glidden, Miriam Libicki, and Liana Finck. Rooted in a conception of identity based as much on rebellion as identification and belonging, these artists' representations of Jewishness take shape in the spaces between how we see ourselves and how others see us. They experiment with different representations and affiliations without forgetting that identity ties the self to others. Stemming from Kominsky Crumb's iconic 1989 comic "Nose Job," in which her alter ego refuses to assimilate through cosmetic surgery, Oksman's study is an arresting exploration of invention in the face of the pressure to disappear.