Paris 1919

Author: Margaret MacMillan

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0307432963

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 9001


A landmark work of narrative history, Paris 1919 is the first full-scale treatment of the Peace Conference in more than twenty-five years. It offers a scintillating view of those dramatic and fateful days when much of the modern world was sketched out, when countries were created—Iraq, Yugoslavia, Israel—whose troubles haunt us still. Winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize • Winner of the PEN Hessell Tiltman Prize • Winner of the Duff Cooper Prize Between January and July 1919, after “the war to end all wars,” men and women from around the world converged on Paris to shape the peace. Center stage, for the first time in history, was an American president, Woodrow Wilson, who with his Fourteen Points seemed to promise to so many people the fulfillment of their dreams. Stern, intransigent, impatient when it came to security concerns and wildly idealistic in his dream of a League of Nations that would resolve all future conflict peacefully, Wilson is only one of the larger-than-life characters who fill the pages of this extraordinary book. David Lloyd George, the gregarious and wily British prime minister, brought Winston Churchill and John Maynard Keynes. Lawrence of Arabia joined the Arab delegation. Ho Chi Minh, a kitchen assistant at the Ritz, submitted a petition for an independent Vietnam. For six months, Paris was effectively the center of the world as the peacemakers carved up bankrupt empires and created new countries. This book brings to life the personalities, ideals, and prejudices of the men who shaped the settlement. They pushed Russia to the sidelines, alienated China, and dismissed the Arabs. They struggled with the problems of Kosovo, of the Kurds, and of a homeland for the Jews. The peacemakers, so it has been said, failed dismally; above all they failed to prevent another war. Margaret MacMillan argues that they have unfairly been made the scapegoats for the mistakes of those who came later. She refutes received ideas about the path from Versailles to World War II and debunks the widely accepted notion that reparations imposed on the Germans were in large part responsible for the Second World War. Praise for Paris 1919 “It’s easy to get into a war, but ending it is a more arduous matter. It was never more so than in 1919, at the Paris Conference. . . . This is an enthralling book: detailed, fair, unfailingly lively. Professor MacMillan has that essential quality of the historian, a narrative gift.” —Allan Massie, The Daily Telegraph (London)

Paris 1919

Author: Margaret MacMillan

Publisher: John Murray

ISBN: 9781529325263

Category:

Page: 592

View: 755


Previously published as Peacemakers Between January and July 1919, after the war to end all wars, men and women from all over the world converged on Paris for the Peace Conference. At its heart were the leaders of the three great powers - Woodrow Wilson, Lloyd George and Clemenceau. Kings, prime ministers and foreign ministers with their crowds of advisers rubbed shoulders with journalists and lobbyists for a hundred causes - from Armenian independence to women's rights. Everyone had business in Paris that year - T.E. Lawrence, Queen Marie of Romania, Maynard Keynes, Ho Chi Minh. There had never been anything like it before, and there never has been since. For six extraordinary months the city was effectively the centre of world government as the peacemakers wound up bankrupt empires and created new countries. They pushed Russia to the sidelines, alienated China and dismissed the Arabs, struggled with the problems of Kosovo, of the Kurds, and of a homeland for the Jews. The peacemakers, so it has been said, failed dismally; failed above all to prevent another war. Margaret MacMillan argues that they have unfairly been made scapegoats for the mistakes of those who came later. They tried to be evenhanded, but their goals - to make defeated countries pay without destroying them, to satisfy impossible nationalist dreams, to prevent the spread of Bolshevism and to establish a world order based on democracy and reason - could not be achieved by diplomacy. Paris 1919 (originally published as Peacemakers) offers a prismatic view of the moment when much of the modern world was first sketched out.

Intersection: Paris, 1919 (An exclusive prologue to The Ways of the World)

Author: Robert Goddard

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448171245

Category: Fiction

Page: 12

View: 8445


A digital exclusive prologue to Robert Goddard’s new thriller, The Ways of the World. 1919. The eyes of the world are on Paris, where statesmen, diplomats and politicians have gathered to discuss the fate of half the world’s nations in the aftermath of the cataclysm that was the Great War. A horde of journalists, spies and opportunists have also gathered in the city and the last thing the British diplomatic community needs at such a time is the mysterious death of a senior member of their delegation.

Urs Fischer

Author: Urs Fischer

Publisher: Jrp Editions

ISBN: 9783905770155

Category: Art

Page: 87

View: 3878


Edited by Urs Fischer. Text by Rein Wolfs.

The Paris Peace Conference 1919

Author: Nick Shepley

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 1785383485

Category: History

Page: 59

View: 5225


In six months, from December 1918 to May 1919, the fate of the world was decided by a small group of statesmen and diplomats in Paris. The First World War had left behind a chaotic legacy of new nations, collapsed empires and the question of how Germany should be punished. This eBook is the first in a new series called 'Study Essentials', which takes complex historical events and makes them accessible and easy to understand for students of all experience and abilities. If you are studying inter war diplomacy for the first time, this eBook is the perfect introduction to the Paris Peace Conference. It includes: * A short history of the First World War * An overview of the victorious powers * An overview of the defeated powers * The history of European empires after the war * The historiography of the Paris Peace Conference * Advice on how to answer essay questions

New European Orders, 1919 and 1991

Author: Samuel F. Wells,Paula Bailey Smith

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 121

View: 1588


This text examines the effects on US-Europe relations brought about by the end of the Cold War and the changes in political relations between European states. The current situation is compared and contrasted with the creation of a new Europe in 1919, in the belief that many of the issues are similar, and even that many of the post-Cold War issues have their origins in World War I, and its peace settlement. Topics covered include: alterations in international systems, public ipinion and propaganda, minority rights, economic transitions, lessons from the break-up of Yugoslavia, and collective security.

A History of Homosexuality in Europe, Vol. I

Author: Florence Tamagne

Publisher: Algora Publishing

ISBN: 0875861997

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7963


Just crawling out from under the Victorian blanket, Europe was devastated by a gruesome war that consumed the flower of its youth. Tamagne examines the currents of nostalgia and yearning, euphoria, rebellion, and exploration in the post-war era, and the b"

A History of Homosexuality in Europe, Vol. I & II

Author: Florence Tamagne

Publisher: Algora Publishing

ISBN: 0875863574

Category: Electronic books

Page: 490

View: 7057


Just crawling out from under the Victorian blanket, Europe was devastated by a gruesome war that consumed the flower of its youth. Tamagne examines the currents of nostalgia and yearning, euphoria, rebellion, and exploration in the post-war era, and the b"