Pimp

Author: Iceberg Slim

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451617143

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 9379


“[In Pimp], Iceberg Slim breaks down some of the coldest, capitalist concepts I’ve ever heard in my life.” —Dave Chappelle, from his Nextflix special The Bird Revelation Pimp sent shockwaves throughout the literary world when it published in 1969. Iceberg Slim’s autobiographical novel offered readers a never-before-seen account of the sex trade, and an unforgettable look at the mores of Chicago’s street life during the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. In the preface, Slim says it best, “In this book, I will take you, the reader, with me into the secret inner world of the pimp.” An immersive experience unlike anything before it, Pimp would go on to sell millions of copies, with translations throughout the world. And it would have a profound impact upon generations of writers, entertainers, and filmmakers, making it the classic hustler’s tale that never seems to go out of style.

Eloquence of Effort

Author: Indar Maharaj

Publisher: Indar Maharaj

ISBN: 0995344019

Category: Science

Page: 614

View: 1960


The Eloquence of Effort echoes the merits of conscientious toil. It provides an insightful look into the benefits of sustained socio-economic effort. To convincingly argue that dreams are only achievable through mind-numbing toil, the writer draws heavily from biographical, philosophical, economic, religious, historical and scientific data. Work is the mission; the multiple rewards are the byproducts, he argues. Moreover, the pleasure resides in the effort, not the results. Against the dark backdrop of malignancies inflicted on society by unrepentant leeches, the benefit of conscientious work is sharply focused. The reader is imperceptibly nudged into a higher plane of reality: namely, purposeful effort, regardless of its nature, is supremely rewarding. The writer forces the realization that regardless of the outcome, effort is never wasted. Conversely, indolence is the bane of progress and the root cause of economic crimes. Indeed, corruption in all its diabolical forms is nothing but laziness masquerading as diligence and embraced by vacuous minds craving the most for the least. Analysis of biographical data sustains the thesis that industry prolongs life; inaction truncates it – a finding supported by the second Law of Thermodynamics. The persuasiveness of the arguments is supported by a wealth of references. Together they form the final authority; they have given resonance to the arguments contained herein.

A History of American Crime Fiction

Author: Chris Raczkowski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108548431

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 3847


A History of American Crime Fiction places crime fiction within a context of aesthetic practices and experiments, intellectual concerns, and historical debates generally reserved for canonical literary history. Toward that end, the book is divided into sections that reflect the periods that commonly organize American literary history, with chapters highlighting crime fiction's reciprocal relationships with early American literature, romanticism, realism, modernism and postmodernism. It surveys everything from 17th-century execution sermons, the detective fiction of Harriet Spofford and T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, to the films of David Lynch, HBO's The Sopranos, and the podcast Serial, while engaging a wide variety of critical methods. As a result, this book expands crime fiction's significance beyond the boundaries of popular genres and explores the symbiosis between crime fiction and canonical literature that sustains and energizes both.

A History of the African American Novel

Author: Valerie Babb

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107061725

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 498

View: 4329


A History of the African American Novel offers an in-depth overview of the development of the novel and its major genres. In the first part of this book, Valerie Babb examines the evolution of the novel from the 1850s to the present, showing how the concept of black identity has transformed along with the art form. The second part of this History explores the prominent genres of African American novels, such as neoslave narratives, detective fiction, and speculative fiction, and considers how each one reflects changing understandings of blackness. This book builds on other literary histories by including early black print culture, African American graphic novels, pulp fiction, and the history of adaptation of black novels to film. By placing novels in conversation with other documents - early black newspapers and magazines, film, and authorial correspondence - A History of the African American Novel brings many voices to the table to broaden interpretations of the novel's development.

A Piece of the Action

Author: Eithne Quinn

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231551010

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 278

View: 8574


Hollywood is often thought of—and certainly by Hollywood itself—as a progressive haven. However, in the decade after the passage of the Civil Rights Act, the film industry grew deeply conservative when it came to conflicts over racial justice. Amid black self-assertion and white backlash, many of the most heated struggles in film were fought over employment. In A Piece of the Action, Eithne Quinn reveals how Hollywood catalyzed wider racial politics, through representation on screen as well as in battles over jobs and resources behind the scenes. Based on extensive archival research and detailed discussions of films like In the Heat of the Night, Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song, Super Fly, Claudine, and Blue Collar, this volume considers how issues of race and labor played out on the screen during the tumultuous early years of affirmative action. Quinn charts how black actors leveraged their performance capital to force meaningful changes to employment and film content. She examines the emergence of Sidney Poitier and other African Americans as A-list stars; the careers of black filmmakers such as Melvin Van Peebles and Ossie Davis; and attempts by the federal government and black advocacy groups to integrate cinema. Quinn also highlights the limits of Hollywood’s liberalism, showing how predominantly white filmmakers, executives, and unions hid the persistence of racism behind feel-good stories and public-relations avowals of tolerance. A rigorous analysis of the deeply rooted patterns of racial exclusion in American cinema, A Piece of the Action sheds light on why conservative and corporate responses to antiracist and labor activism remain pervasive in today’s Hollywood.

Street Lit

Author: Keenan Norris

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810892634

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 244

View: 6134


This collection of articles, essays, interviews, and poems defines urban literature—street lit—and provides valuable insights into a cultural force that is fast becoming as important to the American literary scene as hip-hop has meant to music. Comprised of work by scholars, established authors, and new voices, Street Lit will connect with any reader wanting to grasp the significance of this sometimes controversial but unquestionably popular art form.

The Culture and Politics of Contemporary Street Gang Memoirs

Author: Josephine Metcalf

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617032824

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 1142


The publication of Sanyika Shakur’s Monster: The Autobiography of an L.A. Gang Member in 1993 generated a huge amount of excitement in literary circles—New York Times book critic Michiko Kakutani deemed it a “shocking and galvanic book”—and set off a new publishing trend of gang memoirs in the 1990s. The memoirs showcased tales of violent confrontation and territorial belonging but also offered many of the first journalistic and autobiographical accounts of the much-mythologized gang subculture. In The Culture and Politics of Contemporary Street Gang Memoirs, Josephine Metcalf focuses on three of these memoirs—Shakur’s Monster; Luis J. Rodriguez’s Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A.; and Stanley “Tookie” Williams’s Blue Rage, Black Redemption—as key representatives of the gang autobiography. Metcalf examines the conflict among violence, thrilling sensationalism, and the authorial desire to instruct and warn competing within these works. The narrative arcs of the memoirs themselves rest on the process of conversion from brutal, young gang bangers to nonviolent, enlightened citizens. Metcalf analyzes the emergence, production, marketing, and reception of gang memoirs. Through interviews with Rodriguez, Shakur, and Barbara Cottman Becnel (Williams's editor), Metcalf reveals both the writing and publishing processes. This book analyzes key narrative conventions, specifically how diction, dialogue, and narrative arcs shape the works. The book also explores how the memoirs are consumed. This interdisciplinary study—fusing literary criticism, sociology, ethnography, reader-response study, and editorial theory—brings scholarly attention to a popular, much-discussed, but understudied modern expression.

Lust for Life!

Author: John Neil Munro

Publisher: Birlinn

ISBN: 085790664X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 220

View: 1021


In the mid-1980s Irvine Welsh's life was going nowhere fast. His teenage dreams of being a footballer or a rock star were over, and he was stuck in a series of white-collar jobs which he loathed. With the last throw of the dice, he started to write. In 1993 his debut novel - which centred on the desperate day-to-day struggles of a group of Edinburgh schemies and junkies - was published. Even Irvine's publisher, Secker & Warburg, didn't hold out much hope. Only 1,000 copies were printed and the word was that Irvine might become a cult author, a 'Scottish Bukowski'. But, as the rave reviews increased, the book - memorably described as 'the voice of punk, grown up, grown wiser and grown eloquent' - rapidly achieved global success. It was followed, in 1996, by Danny Boyle's raw, high-energy film, which received worldwide critical acclaim and launched the careers of several young Scots actors such as Ewan McGregor, Ewen Bremner and Kelly Macdonald. So, how did an unknown Edinburgh writer pen the most talked-about book of a generation? Read the inside story of the Trainspotting phenomenon.

Soul

Author: Monique Guillory,Richard Green

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814730841

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 324

View: 2609


No other word in the English language is more endemic to contemporary Black American culture and identity than "Soul". Since the 1960s Soul has been frequently used to market and sell music, food, and fashion. However, Soul also refers to a pervasive belief in the capacity of the Black body/spirit to endure the most trying of times in an ongoing struggle for freedom and equality. While some attention has been given to various genre manifestations of Soul-as in Soul music and food-no book has yet fully explored the discursive terrain signified by the term. In this broad-ranging, free-spirited book, a diverse group of writers, artists, and scholars reflect on the ubiquitous but elusive concept of Soul. Topics include: politics and fashion, Blaxploitation films, language, literature, dance, James Brown, and Schoolhouse Rock. Among the contributors are Angela Davis, Manning Marable, Paul Gilroy, Lyle Ashton Harris, Michelle Wallace, Ishmael Reed, Greg Tate, Manthia Diawara, and dream hampton.

100 American Crime Writers

Author: Steven Powell

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 0230525377

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 373

View: 2422


From Edgar Allan Poe to James Ellroy, crime writers have provided some of the most popular, controversial, acclaimed and disturbing works in American literature. 100 American Crime Writers provides critical biographies of some of the greatest and most important crime writers in American history. Both an important scholarly work and an enjoyable read accessible to a wider audience, this addition in Palgrave's Crime Files series includes discussion of the lives of key crime writers, as well as analysis of the full breadth and scope of the genre - from John Dickson Carr's Golden Age detective stories to Raymond Chandler's hardboiled Philip Marlowe novels, Ed McBain's 87th Precinct police procedurals to Megan Abbott's modern day reimagining of the femme fatale. Drawing on some of the best and most recent scholarship in the field, all of the key writers and themes of the genre are discussed in this comprehensive study of one of the most fascinating and popular of literary genres.