Post-traumatic Culture

Author: Kirby Farrell

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801857874

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 8813


According to author Kirby Farrell, the concept of trauma has shaped some of the central narratives of the 1990s--from Vietnam war stories to the video farewells of Heaven's Gate cult members. In this unique study, Farrell explores the surprising uses of trauma as both an enabling fiction and an explanatory tool during periods of overwhelming cultural change.

Post-Traumatic Public Theology

Author: Stephanie N. Arel,Shelly Rambo

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319406604

Category: Religion

Page: 312

View: 5759


This book imagines new modes of religious response to trauma, moving beyond simple answers to the ‘why’ of human suffering toward discussions of profound expressions of faith in the aftermath of trauma. Engaging current realities such as war, race, and climate change, chapters feature specific locations from which theology is done and draw on the resources of Christian faith in order to respond. This volume recognizes religious leaders as first-responders to trauma and offers theological reflections that can stand up in the current realities of violence and its aftermath. The writings provide models for how to integrate the language of faith with the literature of trauma.

Cultural Melancholia: US Trauma Discourses Before and After 9/11

Author: Christina Cavedon

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 900430598X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 424

View: 8190


Applying melancholia as an analytical concept, Christina Cavedon’s Cultural Melancholia: US Trauma Discourses Before and After 9/11 discusses novels by Jay McInerney and Don DeLillo in light of an American cultural malaise pre-dating the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

Berserk Style in American Culture

Author: K. Farrell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 023033914X

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 4442


Focusing on post-Vietnam America, using perspectives from psychology, anthropology, and physiology, this book demonstrates the need for criticism to unpack the confusions in language and cultural fantasy that drive the nation's fascination with the berserk style.

Interdisciplinary Handbook of Trauma and Culture

Author: Yochai Ataria,David Gurevitz,Haviva Pedaya,Yuval Neria

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319294040

Category: Psychology

Page: 399

View: 5953


This lofty volume analyzes a circular cultural relationship: not only how trauma is reflected in cultural processes and products, but also how trauma itself acts as a critical shaper of literature, the visual and performing arts, architecture, and religion and mythmaking. The political power of trauma is seen through US, Israeli, and Japanese art forms as they reflect varied roles of perpetrator, victim, and witness. Traumatic complexities are traced from spirituality to movement, philosophy to trauma theory. And essays on authors such as Kafka, Plath, and Cormac McCarthy examine how narrative can blur the boundaries of personal and collective experience. Among the topics covered: Television: a traumatic culture. From Hiroshima to Fukushima: comics and animation as subversive agents of memory in Japan. The death of the witness in the era of testimony: Primo Levi and Georges Perec. Sigmund Freud’s Moses and Monotheism and the possibility of writing a traumatic history of religion. Placing collective trauma within its social context: the case of the 9/11 attacks. Killing the killer: rampage and gun rights as a syndrome. This volume appeals to multiple readerships including researchers and clinicians, sociologists, anthropologists, historians, and media researchers.

Trauma, Culture, and Metaphor

Author: John P. Wilson,Jacob D. Lindy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135926115

Category: Psychology

Page: 232

View: 6948


In Trauma, Culture, and Metaphor, John Wilson and Jacob Lindy explore the language of both individual and collective trauma in an era dominated by globalization and interconnectedness. Through lucid, careful discussion, this important book builds a bridge between the etymology of trauma-related terms commonly used in Western cultures and those of other cultures, such as the Burundi-Rwandan ihahamuka. It also provides the clinician with a framework for working with trauma survivors using a cross-cultural vocabulary—one often based in metaphor—to fully address the experienced trauma and to begin work on reconnection and self-reinvention.

Post-Traumatic Art in the City

Author: Isabelle de le Court

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350194360

Category: Art

Page: 240

View: 1085


Post-Traumatic Art in the City comprises an original analysis of the nexus of war, art and urban society in two specific contexts: late 20th-century Beirut and Sarajevo. With an emphasis on conceptions of the 'post-traumatic', De le Court explores how cities and art are mutually formative in war and post-war contexts, providing unique insight into the politically and psychologically driven art scenes from within the works of art themselves. Grounded in close analyses and new research, the book makes an important contribution to the fields of art history and trauma studies.

Wounds and Words

Author: Christa Schönfelder

Publisher: transcript Verlag

ISBN: 3839423783

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 346

View: 7157


Trauma has become a hotly contested topic in literary studies. But interest in trauma is not new; its roots extend to the Romantic period, when novelists and the first psychiatrists influenced each others' investigations of the »wounded mind«. This book looks back to these early attempts to understand trauma, reading a selection of Romantic novels in dialogue with Romantic and contemporary psychiatry. It then carries that dialogue forward to postmodern fiction, examining further how empirical approaches can deepen our theorizations of trauma. Within an interdisciplinary framework, this study reveals fresh insights into the poetics, politics, and ethics of trauma fiction.

Handbook of Popular Culture and Biomedicine

Author: Arno Görgen,German Alfonso Nunez,Heiner Fangerau

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319906771

Category: Social Science

Page: 385

View: 9928


This handbook explores the ways biomedicine and pop culture interact while simultaneously introducing the reader with the tools and ideas behind this new field of enquiry. From comic books to health professionals, from the arts to genetics, from sci-fi to medical education, from TV series to ethics, it offers different entry points to an exciting and central aspect of contemporary culture: how and what we learn about (and from) scientific knowledge and its representation in pop culture. Divided into three sections the handbook surveys the basics, the micro-, and the macroaspects of this interaction between specialized knowledge and cultural production: After the introduction of basic concepts of and approaches to the topic from a variety of disciplines, the respective theories and methods are applied in specific case studies. The final section is concerned with larger social and historical trends of the use of biomedical knowledge in popular culture. Presenting over twenty-five original articles from international scholars with different disciplinary backgrounds, this handbook introduces the topic of pop culture and biomedicine to both new and mature researchers alike. The articles, all complete with a rich source of further references, are aimed at being a sincere entry point to researchers and academic educators interested in this somewhat unexplored field of culture and biomedicine.

Shakespeare, Trauma and Contemporary Performance

Author: Catherine Silverstone

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135178305

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 186

View: 7409


Shakespeare, Trauma and Contemporary Performance examines how contemporary performances of Shakespeare’s texts on stage and screen engage with violent events and histories. The book attempts to account for – but not to rationalize – the ongoing and pernicious effects of various forms of violence as they have emerged in selected contemporary performances of Shakespeare’s texts, especially as that violence relates to apartheid, colonization, racism, homophobia and war. Through a series of wide-ranging case studies, which are informed by debates in Shakespeare, trauma and performance studies and developed from extensive archival research, the book examines how performances and their documentary traces work variously to memorialize, remember and witness violent events and histories. In the process, Silverstone considers the ethical and political implications of attempts to represent trauma in performance, especially in relation to performing, spectatorship and community formation. Ranging from the mainstream to the fringe, key performances discussed include Gregory Doran’s Titus Andronicus (1995) for Johannesburg’s Market Theatre; Don C. Selwyn’s New Zealand-made film, The Maori Merchant of Venice (2001); Philip Osment’s appropriation of The Tempest in This Island’s Mine for London’s Gay Sweatshop (1988); and Nicholas Hytner’s Henry V (2003) for the National Theatre in London.