Rebus's Scotland

Author: Ian Rankin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780752877716

Category: Edinburgh (Scotland)

Page: 131

View: 2478


Ian Rankin's guide to the places in Scotland that have provided inspiration for his bestselling Inspector Rebus novels. 'His novels are playing a significant part in redefining Scotland's image of itself in literature' INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY In REBUS'S SCOTLAND Ian Rankin uncovers the Scotland that the tourist never sees, highlighting the places that inspired the settings for the Inspector Rebus novels. Rankin also reveals the story of Rebus and how he came into being, who he is, and what his - and Rankin's - Scotland is like. With over 100 evocative photographs, specially commissioned to reflect the text, REBUS'S SCOTLAND is the perfect gift for anyone interested in Scotland or in the novels of Ian Rankin.

Ian Rankin

Author: Erin E. MacDonald

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786471883

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 455

View: 9392


Ian Rankin is considered by many to be Scotland's greatest living crime fiction author. Most well known for his Inspector Rebus series--which has earned critical acclaim as well as scores of fans worldwide--Rankin is a prolific author whose other works include spy thrillers, nonfiction books and articles, short stories, novels, graphic novels, audio recordings, television/film, and plays. This companion--the first to provide a complete look at all of his writings--includes alphabetized entries on Rankin's works, characters, and themes; a biography; a chronology; maps of Rebus' Edinburgh; and an annotated bibliography. A champion of both Edinburgh and Scotland, Rankin continues to combine engaging entertainment with socio-political commentary showing Edinburgh as a microcosm of Scotland, and Scotland as a microcosm of the world. His writing investigates questions of Scottish identity, British history, masculinity, and contemporary culture while providing mystery readers with complex, suspenseful plots, realistic character development, and a unique mix of American hard-boiled and procedural styles with Scottish dialects and sensibilities.

Blurred Boundaries

Author: Rodney Marshall

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 132686212X

Category: Fiction

Page: 346

View: 3935


In the mid-1980s, in Edinburgh, Ian Rankin was hatching a plot for a 'crime thriller' from his student digs. Knots & Crosses - like its frayed protagonist John Rebus - was rough around the edges but marked a promising debut. More than a quarter of a century later, Rankin and Rebus have a global following. The series has been both critically acclaimed and commercially popular. Detective John Rebus is anything but conventional. The same can be said of Ian Rankin's innovative texts which take crime fiction far beyond formulaic genre, producing radical, disruptive, borderline texts. In the first ever full-length study of all twenty-one Rebus novels, Rodney Marshall argues that Rankin's fiction continues to break new ground, blurring the boundaries between traditional detective novel and modern literature. November 2016 fifth edition: now includes an exclusive eighteen page interview with Ian Rankin and a chapter on Rather Be The Devil, Rankin's new Rebus novel.

Noir in the North

Author: Stacy Gillis,Gunnthorunn Gudmundsdottir

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1501342878

Category: Fiction

Page: 280

View: 4418


What is often termed 'Nordic Noir' has dominated detective fiction, film and television internationally for over two decades. But what are the parameters of this genre, both historically and geographically? What is noirish and what is northern about Nordic noir? The foreword and coda in this volume, by two internationally-bestselling writers of crime fiction in the north, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir and Gunnar Staalesen, speak to the social contract undertaken by writers of noir, while the interview with the renowned crime writer Val McDermid adds nuance to our understanding of what it is to write noir in the North. Divided into four sections – Gender and Sexuality, Space and Place, Politics and Crime, and Genre and Genealogy – Noir in the North challenges the traditional critical histories of noir by investigating how it functions transnationally beyond the geographical borders of Scandinavia. The essays in this book deepen our critical understanding of noir more generally by demonstrating, for example, Nordic noir's connection to fin-de-siècle literatures and to mid-century interior design, and by investigating the function of the state in crime fiction.

Scotland's Books

Author: Robert Crawford

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199888973

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 848

View: 4582


From Treasure Island to Trainspotting, Scotland's rich literary tradition has influenced writing across centuries and cultures far beyond its borders. Here, for the first time, is a single volume presenting the glories of fifteen centuries of Scottish literature. In Scotland's Books the much loved poet Robert Crawford tells the story of Scottish imaginative writing and its relationship to the country's history. Stretching from the medieval masterpieces of St. Columba's Iona - the earliest surviving Scottish work - to the energetic world of twenty-first-century writing by authors such as Ali Smith and James Kelman, this outstanding account traces the development of literature in Scotland and explores the cultural, linguistic and literary heritage of the nation. It includes extracts from the writing discussed to give a flavor of the original work, and its new research ranges from specially made translations of ancient poems to previously unpublished material from the Scottish Enlightenment and interviews with living writers. Informative and readable, this is the definitive single-volume guide to the marvelous legacy of Scottish literature.

The Cambridge Companion to Scottish Literature

Author: Gerard Carruthers,Liam McIlvanney

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521189365

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 301

View: 8066


A unique introduction, guide and reference work for students and readers of Scottish literature from the pre-medieval period.

Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Literature

Author: Berthold Schoene

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748630287

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 432

View: 6893


The Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Literature examines the ways in which the cultural and political role of Scottish writing has changed since the country's successful referendum on national self-rule in 1997. In doing so, it makes a convincing case for a distinctive post-devolution Scottish criticism. Introducing over forty original essays under four main headings - 'Contexts', 'Genres', 'Authors' and 'Topics' - the volume covers the entire spectrum of current interests and topical concerns in the field of Scottish studies and heralds a new era in Scottish writing, literary criticism and cultural theory. It records and critically outlines prominent literary trends and developments, the specific political circumstances and aesthetic agendas that propel them, as well as literature's capacity for envisioning new and alternative futures. Issues under discussion include class, sexuality and gender, nationhood and globalisation, the New Europe and cosmopolitan citizenship, postcoloniality,

Scotland in Theory

Author: Eleanor Bell,Gavin Miller

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9789042010284

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 287

View: 4156


Scotland in Theory offers new ways of reading Scottish texts and culture within the context of an altered political framework and a changing sense of national identity. With the re-establishment of a Parliament in Edinburgh, issues of nationality and nationalism can be looked at afresh. It is timely now to revisit representations of Scottish culture in cinematography and literature, and also to examine aspects of gender, sexuality and ideology that have shaped how Scots have come to understand themselves. Established and younger critics use a variety of theoretical approaches here to catch an authentic sense of a post-modern Scotland in the process of change. Literature and the arts provide radical ways of knowing what Scotland, in theory, could become. The collection will be of interest to teachers and students of Scottish and English literature, literary theory, cultural and media analysis, and the history of ideas. Contributors include Eleanor Bell, Kasia Boddy, Cairns Craig, Thomas Docherty, Christopher Harvie, Ellen Raïssa-Jackson, Willy Maley, Gavin Miller, Tom Nairn, Sarah Neely, Laurence Nicoll, Berthold Schoene, Anne McManus Scriven, A.J.P. Thomson, Ronald Turnbull, Christopher Whyte.