Red China Blues (reissue)

Author: Jan Wong

Publisher: Anchor Canada

ISBN: 0385674368

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 9484


Jan Wong, a Canadian of Chinese descent, went to China as a starry-eyed Maoist in 1972 at the height of the Cultural Revolution. A true believer -- and one of only two Westerners permitted to enroll at Beijing University -- her education included wielding a pneumatic drill at the Number One Machine Tool Factory. In the name of the Revolution, she renounced rock and roll, hauled pig manure in the paddy fields, and turned in a fellow student who sought her help in getting to the United States. She also met and married the only American draft dodger from the Vietnam War to seek asylum in China. Red China Blues begins as Wong's startling -- and ironic -- memoir of her rocky six-year romance with Maoism that began to sour as she became aware of the harsh realities of Chinese communism and led to her eventual repatriation to the West. Returning to China in the late eighties as a journalist, she covered both the brutal Tiananmen Square crackdown and the tumultuous era of capitalist reforms under Deng Xiaoping. In a wry, absorbing, and often surreal narrative, she relates the horrors that led to her disillusionment with the "worker's paradise." And through the stories of the people -- an unhappy young woman who was sold into marriage, China's most famous dissident, a doctor who lengthens penises -- Wong creates an extraordinary portrait of the world's most populous nation. In setting out to show readers in the Western world what life is like in China, and why we should care, Wong reacquaints herself with the old friends -- and enemies -- of her radical past, and comes to terms with the legacies of her ancestral homeland.

Red China Blues

Author: Jan Wong

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780385665667

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 5359


Jan Wong, a Canadian of Chinese descent, went to China as a starry-eyed Maoist in 1972 at the height of the Cultural Revolution. A true believer -- and one of only two Westerners permitted to enroll at Beijing University -- her education included wielding a pneumatic drill at the Number One Machine Tool Factory. In the name of the Revolution, she renounced rock and roll, hauled pig manure in the paddy fields, and turned in a fellow student who sought her help in getting to the United States. She also met and married the only American draft dodger from the Vietnam War to seek asylum in China. Red China Blues begins as Wong's startling -- and ironic -- memoir of her rocky six-year romance with Maoism that began to sour as she became aware of the harsh realities of Chinese communism and led to her eventual repatriation to the West. Returning to China in the late eighties as a journalist, she covered both the brutal Tiananmen Square crackdown and the tumultuous era of capitalist reforms under Deng Xiaoping. In a wry, absorbing, and often surreal narrative, she relates the horrors that led to her disillusionment with the "worker's paradise." And through the stories of the people -- an unhappy young woman who was sold into marriage, China's most famous dissident, a doctor who lengthens penises -- Wong creates an extraordinary portrait of the world's most populous nation. In setting out to show readers in the Western world what life is like in China, and why we should care, Wong reacquaints herself with the old friends -- and enemies -- of her radical past, and comes to terms with the legacies of her ancestral homeland.

Beijing Confidential

Author: Jan Wong

Publisher: Anchor Canada

ISBN: 0307375188

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 4122


Jan Wong has returned to Beijing. Her quest: to find someone she encountered briefly in 1973, and whose life she was certain she had ruined forever. In the early 70s, Jan Wong travelled from Canada to become one of only two Westerners permitted to study at Beijing University. One day a young stranger, Yin Luoyi, asked for help in getting to the United States. Wong, then a starry-eyed Maoist, immediately reported Yin to the authorities. Thirty-three years on, and more than a decade after the publication of her bestselling Red China Blues, Jan Wong revisits the Chinese capital to begin her search for the person who has haunted her conscience. She wants to apologize, to somehow make amends. At the very least, she wants to discover whether Yin survived. As Jan Wong hunts through the city, she finds herself travelling back through the decades, back to her experiences in the Cultural Revolution, to places that were once of huge importance to her. She has changed, of course, but not as much as Beijing. One of the world’s most ancient cities is now one of its most modern. The neon signs no longer say “Long Live Chairman Mao” but instead tout Mary Kay cosmetics and Kentucky Fried Chicken. Places she once knew have vanished, bulldozed into oblivion and replaced by avant-garde architecture, trendy bars, and sleek condos. The people she once knew have changed, too, for better or for worse. Memories are everywhere. By searching out old friends and acquaintances, Jan Wong uncovers tantalizing clues about the woman she wronged. She realizes her deepest fears and regrets were justified. But Yin herself remains elusive–until the day she phones Jan Wong. Emotionally powerful and rich with detail, Beijing Confidential weaves together three distinct stories–Wong’s journey from remorse to redemption, Yin’s journey from disgrace to respectability, and Beijing’s stunning journey from communism to capitalism.

Chinese Whispers

Author: Jan Wong

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN: 1848875517

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 4216


In 1972, Jan Wong became one of only two Westerners admitted to Beijing University at the height of the Cultural Revolution. One day, a student, Yin Luoyi, sought Jan's assistance in going to the United States. Wong, then a starry-eyed Maoist, reported Yin to the authorities. Yin promptly disappeared. Now, thirty-three years later, Wong returns to Beijing to search for the woman who has haunted her conscience. She hopes to apologise, perhaps somehow to try to make amends. At the very least, she wants to find out whether Yin has survived. Preoccupied by the past, fascinated by China's present and future, Jan Wong searches out old friends, foes and comrades in this half-familiar city, finally uncovering the truth about the woman she wronged. Chinese Whispers tells a unique and unforgettable story of communism and capitalism, of guilt and atonement, of remembering and forgetting.

Shakespeare Would Cry

Author: Anna Peak

Publisher: Lennex

ISBN: 9785458896580

Category:

Page: 44

View: 7917


In this book, we have hand-picked the most sophisticated, unanticipated, absorbing (if not at times crackpot!), original and musing book reviews of "Red China Blues: My Long March From Mao to Now." Don't say we didn't warn you: these reviews are known to shock with their unconventionality or intimacy. Some may be startled by their biting sincerity; others may be spellbound by their unbridled flights of fantasy. Don't buy this book if: 1. You don't have nerves of steel. 2. You expect to get pregnant in the next five minutes. 3. You've heard it all.

Books about China

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 9781230561479

Category:

Page: 32

View: 9191


Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (books not included). Pages: 34. Chapters: Analysis of Chinese Macroeconomy, A Mortal Flower, A Year In Upper Felicity, Birdless Summer, Chinese Destinies, Chinese Lessons, Death by a Thousand Cuts (book), De Christiana expeditione apud Sinas, Encyclopaedia Sinica, Flora Sinensis, History of Ming, Hungry Ghosts: Mao's Secret Famine, Life and Death in Shanghai, One's Company, On China, Praying for Power: Buddhism and the Formation of Gentry Society in Late-Ming China, Red China Blues: My Long March from Mao to Now, Red Star Over China, Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45, Tao: On the Road and on the Run in Outlaw China, The Good Women of China, The New Chinese Empire, The Party: The Secret World of China's Communist Rulers, The River at the Center of the World, Twilight in the Forbidden City, Unbound (book), When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order, Will the Boat Sink the Water, Yeolha Ilgi.

Museum Representations of Maoist China

Author: Amy Jane Barnes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317093011

Category: Art

Page: 264

View: 5895


The collection, interpretation and display of art from the People’s Republic of China, and particularly the art of the Cultural Revolution, have been problematic for museums. These objects challenge our perception of ’Chineseness’ and their style, content and the means of their production question accepted notions of how we perceive art. This book links art history, museology and visual culture studies to examine how museums have attempted to reveal, discuss and resolve some of these issues. Amy Jane Barnes addresses a series of related issues associated with collection and display: how museums deal with difficult and controversial subjects; the role they play in mediating between the object and the audience; the role of the Other in the creation of Self and national identities; the nature, role and function of art in society; the museum as image-maker; the impact of communism (and Maoism) on the cultural history of the twentieth-century; and the appropriation of communist visual iconography. This book will be of interest to researchers and students of museology, visual and cultural studies as well as scholars of Chinese and revolutionary art.

China During the Cultural Revolution, 1966-1976

Author: N.A

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313309052

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 6036


Provides a useful overview of literature on the Chinese Cultural Revolution, including a broad range of topics from the military, education, and religion to economics, foreign relations, and the arts.

Making the Foreign Serve China

Author: Anne-Marie Brady

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742518629

Category: Political Science

Page: 286

View: 9900


This book provides the first detailed analysis of a distinctive element of Chinese foreign policy, waishi, the external policies intended to influence and control both foreigners themselves as well as Chinese citizens' contact with and perception of outsiders. The term also comprises China's external relations—both official state-to-state and unofficial or 'people-to-people' diplomacy. Anne-Marie Brady argues that by encompassing all matters related to foreigners and foreign things, not merely diplomacy, waishi has proven to be one of the most effective tools in the CCP's repertoire for building and then sustaining its hold on power. The author's groundbreaking research is based on a previously unexplored genre of classified waishi materials, extensive interviews with waishi officials and foreign participants of the system, as well as extensive archival research.