Romance of the Three Kingdoms

Author: Lo Kuan-Chung,Robert E. Hegel,C. H. Brewitt-Taylor

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 9780804834681

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 680

View: 1383


This epic saga of brotherhood and rivalry, of loyalty and treachery, of victory and death, forms part of the indelible core of classical Chinese culture and continues to fascinate modern-day readers. In 220 EC, the 400-year-old rule of the mighty Han dynasty came to an end and three kingdoms contested for control of China. Liu Pei, the legitimate heir to the Han throne, elects to fight for his birthright and enlists the aid of his sworn brothers, the impulsive giant Chang Fei and the invincible knight Kuan Yu. The brave band faces a formidable array of enemies, foremost among them the treacherous and bloodthirsty Ts'ao Ts'ao. The bold struggle of the three heroes seems doomed until the reclusive wizard Chuko Liang offers his counsel, and the tide begins to turn. Romance of the Three Kingdoms is China's oldest novel and the first of a great tradition of historical fiction. Believed to have been compiled by the play-wright Lo Kuan-chung in the late fourteenth century, it is indebted to the great San-kuo chi (Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms) completed by the historian Ch'en Shou just before his death in 297 CE. The novel first appeared in print in 1522. This edition, translated in the mid-1920s by C. H. Brewitt-Taylor, is based on a shortened and simplified version which appeared in the 1670s. An Introduction to this reprint by Robert E. Hegel, Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature at Washington University, provides an insightful commentary on the historical background to the novel, its literary origins and its main characters.

Romance of the Three Kingdoms

Author: Lo Kuan-Chung

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 1462903037

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 680

View: 2484


This epic saga of brotherhood and rivalry, of loyalty and treachery, of victory and death, forms part of the indelible core of classical Chinese culture and continues to fascinate modern-day readers. In 220 EC, the 400-year-old rule of the mighty Han dynasty came to an end and three kingdoms contested for control of China. Liu Pei, the legitimate heir to the Han throne, elects to fight for his birthright and enlists the aid of his sworn brothers, the impulsive giant Chang Fei and the invincible knight Kuan Yu. The brave band faces a formidable array of enemies, foremost among them the treacherous and bloodthirsty Ts'ao Ts'ao. The bold struggle of the three heroes seems doomed until the reclusive wizard Chuko Liang offers his counsel, and the tide begins to turn. Romance of the Three Kingdoms is China's oldest novel and the first of a great tradition of historical fiction. Believed to have been compiled by the play-wright Lo Kuan-chung in the late fourteenth century, it is indebted to the great San-kuo chi (Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms) completed by the historian Ch'en Shou just before his death in 297 CE. The novel first appeared in print in 1522. This edition, translated in the mid-1920s by C. H. Brewitt-Taylor, is based on a shortened and simplified version which appeared in the 1670s. An Introduction to this reprint by Robert E. Hegel, Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature at Washington University, provides an insightful commentary on the historical background to the novel, its literary origins and its main characters.

Romance of the Three Kingdoms Volume II

Author: Luo Guanzhong

Publisher: XinXii

ISBN: 3959262868

Category: Fiction

Page: 550

View: 8031


“The world under heaven, after a long period of division, tends to unite; after a long period of union, tends to divide...” The Han dynasty is falling, the rebels and warlords fight each other for the hegemony in China. Who will bring peace to these lands? Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Written by Luo Guanzhong in the 14th century, is one of the four great Chinese classical novels. Discover it in this new edition with illustrations from MIng and Qing dynasties and the whole text in Simplified Chinese. Compare it using the Table of Contents!

Dragon in Ambush

Author: Jeremy Ingalls

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739177834

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 498

View: 982


Dragon in Ambush opens up Mao Zedong’s poems to a radically new interpretation as the corpus of his political ideology to reveal his grand design for total domination of the Communist Party and of China itself. Mao laid out his poems in a systematic and carefully schematized blueprint to assure that his ideas and aims would be followed long after his own lifetime. This work is indispensable in understanding Mao’s thinking and his relationship to the People’s Republic of China.

The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Folk and Popular Literature

Author: Victor H. Mair,Mark Bender

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231153120

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 662

View: 1654


In The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Folk and Popular Literature, two of the world's leading sinologists, Victor H. Mair and Mark Bender, capture the breadth of China's oral-based literary heritage. This collection presents works drawn from the large body of oral literature of many of China's recognized ethnic groups?including the Han, Yi, Miao, Tu, Daur, Tibetan, Uyghur, and Kazak?and the selections include a variety of genres. Chapters cover folk stories, songs, rituals, and drama, as well as epic traditions and professional storytelling, and feature both familiar and little-known texts, from the story of the woman warrior Hua Mulan to the love stories of urban storytellers in the Yangtze delta, the shaman rituals of the Manchu, and a trickster tale of the Daur people from the forests of the northeast. The Cannibal Grandmother of the Yi and other strange creatures and characters unsettle accepted notions of Chinese fable and literary form. Readers are introduced to antiphonal songs of the Zhuang and the Dong, who live among the fantastic limestone hills of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; work and matchmaking songs of the mountain-dwelling She of Fujian province; and saltwater songs of the Cantonese-speaking boat people of Hong Kong. The editors feature the Mongolian epic poems of Geser Khan and Jangar; the sad tale of the Qeo family girl, from the Tu people of Gansu and Qinghai provinces; and local plays known as "rice sprouts" from Hebei province. These fascinating juxtapositions invite comparisons among cultures, styles, and genres, and expert translations preserve the individual character of each thrillingly imaginative work.

China's Governance Puzzle

Author: Jonathan R. Stromseth,Edmund J. Malesky,Dimitar D. Gueorguiev

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107122635

Category: Political Science

Page: 347

View: 1300


The apparent contradiction between China's rapid economic reforms and political authoritarianism is much debated by scholars of comparative political economy. This is the first examination of this issue through the impact of a series of administrative reforms intended to promote government transparency and increase public participation in China.

The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages: Volume 2, Contexts

Author: Martin Maiden,John Charles Smith,Adam Ledgeway

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316025551

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: N.A

View: 5962


What is the origin of the Romance languages and how did they evolve? When and how did they become different from Latin, and from each other? Volume 2 of The Cambridge History of the Romance Languages offers fresh and original reflections on the principal questions and issues in the comparative external histories of the Romance languages. It is organised around the two key themes of influences and institutions, exploring the fundamental influence, of contact with and borrowing from, other languages (including Latin), and the cultural and institutional forces at work in the establishment of standard languages and norms of correctness. A perfect complement to the first volume, it offers an external history of the Romance languages combining data and theory to produce new and revealing perspectives on the shaping of the Romance languages.

Religion, War, and Ethics

Author: Gregory M. Reichberg,Henrik Syse,Nicole M. Hartwell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521450381

Category: Philosophy

Page: 755

View: 4850


This volume offers a comprehensive selection of texts from the world's major religions on the ethical dimensions of war and armed conflict. Despite a considerable rise of interest in Eastern and Western religious teachings on issues of war and peace, the principal texts in which these teachings are expounded have in most cases remained inaccessible to all but a handful of specialists. This is especially true of traditions such as Islam, Buddhism, and Judaism, where the key authoritative treatments are often embedded in texts (e.g., Koranic jurisprudence, religious epics, or Talmudic commentary) that are not overtly about matters pertaining to the ethics of war, thus requiring a difficult process of interpretation and selection, and for which English translations frequently do not exist. Topical and timely for today's debates in the public arena and essential reading for students of religious ethics and the relationship between religion and politics, this book aims to give the reader a proper knowledge of the textual traditions that inform the key struggles over issues of peace and security, identity and land.

The Cambridge History of Ireland: Volume 2, 1550–1730

Author: Jane Ohlmeyer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108651054

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 7848


This volume offers fresh perspectives on the political, military, religious, social, cultural, intellectual, economic, and environmental history of early modern Ireland and situates these discussions in global and comparative contexts. The opening chapters focus on 'Politics' and 'Religion and War' and offer a chronological narrative, informed by the re-interpretation of new archives. The remaining chapters are more thematic, with chapters on 'Society', 'Culture', and 'Economy and Environment', and often respond to wider methodologies and historiographical debates. Interdisciplinary cross-pollination - between, on the one hand, history and, on the other, disciplines like anthropology, archaeology, geography, computer science, literature and gender and environmental studies - informs many of the chapters. The volume offers a range of new departures by a generation of scholars who explain in a refreshing and accessible manner how and why people acted as they did in the transformative and tumultuous years between 1550 and 1730.

The Plum in the Golden Vase or, Chin P'ing Mei, Volume Three

Author: N.A

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400837928

Category: Fiction

Page: 776

View: 7274


In this third volume of a planned five-volume series, David Roy provides a complete and annotated translation of the famous Chin P'ing Mei, an anonymous sixteenth-century Chinese novel that focuses on the domestic life of His-men Ch'ing, a corrupt, upwardly mobile merchant who maintains a harem of six wives and concubines. This work, known primarily for its erotic realism, is also a landmark in the development of narrative art--not only from a specifically Chinese perspective but also in a world-historical context. Written during the second half of the sixteenth century and first published in 1618, The Plum in the Golden Vase is noted for its surprisingly modern technique. With the possible exception of The Tale of Genji (ca. 1010) and Don Quixote (1605, 1615), there is no earlier work of prose fiction of equal sophistication in world literature. Although its importance in the history of Chinese narrative has long been recognized, the technical virtuosity of the author, which is more reminiscent of the Dickens of Bleak House, the Joyce of Ulysses, or the Nabokov of Lolita than anything in earlier Chinese fiction, has not yet received adequate recognition. This is partly because all of the existing European translations are either abridged or based on an inferior recension of the text. This translation and its annotation aim to faithfully represent and elucidate all the rhetorical features of the original in its most authentic form and thereby enable the Western reader to appreciate this Chinese masterpiece at its true worth. Replete with convincing portrayals of the darker side of human nature, it should appeal to anyone interested in a compelling story, compellingly told.