Selected Letters

Author: Nicholas Hagger

Publisher: John Hunt Publishing

ISBN: 1789044421

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 984

View: 6870


Nicholas Hagger's literary, philosophical, historical and political writings are innovatory. He has set out a new approach to literature that combines Romantic and Classical outlooks in a substantial literary oeuvre of 2,000 poems including over 300 classical odes, two poetic epics, five verse plays, three masques, two travelogues and 1,200 stories. He has created a new philosophy of Universalism that focuses on the unity of the universe and humankind and the interconnectedness of all disciplines, and challenges modern philosophy. He has presented an original historical view of the rise and fall of civilisations, and proposed - and detailed - a limited democratic World State with the power to abolish war and solve all the world's problems. Selected Letters draws together those of his letters (written over 60 years) that aid the interpretation and elucidation of his works. Many of his correspondents are well-known figures within literature, philosophy, history and international politics, and Hagger is in the footsteps of Alexander Pope in editing his own letters, which are in the tradition of Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, T.E. Lawrence, Ezra Pound and Ted Hughes (one of his correspondents). They throw light on all aspects of Hagger's vast output, and are required reading for all interested in following the growth of his Universalism, his literary development and his innovatory approach to universal truth. NICHOLAS HAGGER is a poet, man of letters, cultural historian and philosopher. He has lectured at universities in Iraq, Libya and Japan, where he was a Professor of English Literature. He has written 54 books. These include an immense literary offering, most recently King Charles the Wise and Visions of England (both also published by O-Books), and innovatory works within history, philosophy and international politics and statecraft. His archive of papers and manuscripts is held as a Special Collection in the Albert Sloman Library at the University of Essex. In 2016 he was awarded the Gusi Peace Prize for Literature, and in 2019 the BRICS silver medal for ‘Vision for Future'.

New Selected Journals, 1939-1995

Author: Stephen Spender

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571294111

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 816

View: 8017


Private faces in public places Are wiser and nicer Than public faces in private places. W.H. Auden, dedication to Stephen Spender, 1932 Stephen Spender wrote almost a million words of journal entries between his September Journal in 1939 and his death in 1995. In choosing from these voluminous journals for the new edition, the editors have tried to provide a picture of the various lives Spender brought together in autobiographical form. The earlier 1985 edition of the Journals was overseen by the author, and it privileged his thoughts about poetry - his own and other people's. The new edition includes the final ten years of Spender's life and provides access to the more intimate thoughts and feelings of the private man, but equally documents his life as a public intellectual who played a part in shaping the European literary and intellectual culture of his age. As we look back on the dramatic events of the twentieth century, we find that Spender was involved in many of them: the reconstruction of Germany and the construction of Europe (as Unesco's first Literary Councillor), the development of the cultural Cold War (as editor of Encounter), the founding of Israel, the anti-Vietnam movement in America. The Journals provide a personal version of sixty turbulent years of the twentieth century, hovering between diary, autobiography and history.

The Diary

Author: Batsheva Ben-Amos,Dan Ben-Amos

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253046955

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 492

View: 1296


The diary as a genre is found in all literate societies, and these autobiographical accounts are written by persons of all ranks and positions. The Diary offers an exploration of the form in its social, historical, and cultural-literary contexts with its own distinctive features, poetics, and rhetoric. The contributors to this volume examine theories and interpretations relating to writing and studying diaries; the formation of diary canons in the United Kingdom, France, United States, and Brazil; and the ways in which handwritten diaries are transformed through processes of publication and digitization. The authors also explore different diary formats, including the travel diary, the private diary, conflict diaries written during periods of crisis, and the diaries of the digital era, such as blogs. The Diary offers a comprehensive overview of the genre, synthesizing decades of interdisciplinary study to enrich our understanding of, research about, and engagement with the diary as literary form and historical documentation.

Minority Students in East Asia

Author: JoAnn Phillion,Ming Tak Hue,Yuxiang Wang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136699171

Category: Education

Page: 273

View: 678


In Minority Students in East Asia: Government Policies, School Practices and Teacher Responses authors discuss their research on minority students’ schooling (elementary to higher education) in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. Minority students’ educational issues are often neglected in literature and in practice; social and educational conditions that have resulted from globalization – in particular issues pertaining to minority groups’ education, language and other human rights – receive little attention. In addition, many areas of East Asia have viewed themselves as single-ethnicity countries and have not articulated strong agendas around minority rights. The purpose of this book is to highlight key educational issues for specific minority populations in East Asia. Themes addressed include government policies related to minorities; equity issues in the education of minorities; school practices and teacher perspectives on minorities; identity construction in terms of language and culture; national versus ethnic identity; teacher education issues; and parental concerns. The authors also discuss new theoretical orientations to understanding minority educational issues. A particular strength of this book is the use of multicultural education theories to both articulate concerns related to the education of minority students and to provide solutions to these concerns.

Selected Journals of Caroline Healey Dall: 1838-1855

Author: Caroline Wells Healey Dall

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 598

View: 4179


Making available what is perhaps the longest-running diary in existence, Selected Journals of Caroline Healey Dall, 1838-1855 offers what arguably is the most complete account we have of a nineteenth-century American woman's life. Dall (1822-1912), a participant in the transcendentalist, abolitionist, women's rights, and social science movements, filled her journals with intelligent reflections and keen analysis of her world. This, the first of three volumes, begins with her adolescence at Beacon Hill. The journals will address a wide range of topics covering some three-quarters of a century, including family and social rituals and interactions; the routines of woman's work; illnesses, both physical and mental, and their treatment; examples of cross-class and cross-race relations; and the larger world of business, politics, literature, reform, war, religion, and science. In detailing Dall's emotional, intellectual, and spiritual development, the journals also convey a compelling personal story.

First Lady

Author: Sonia Purnell

Publisher: Aurum

ISBN: 1781314705

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9461


From the personal and political upheavals of the Great War, through the Churchills’ ‘wilderness years’ in the 1930s, to Clementine’s desperate efforts to preserve her husband’s health during the struggle against Hitler, this is the inspiring but often ignored story of one of the most important women in modern history. Without Churchill’s inspiring leadership Britain could not have survived its darkest hour and repelled the Nazi menace. Without his wife Clementine, however, he might never have become Prime Minister. By his own admission, the Second World War would have been ‘impossible without her’. Clementine was Winston’s emotional rock and his most trusted confidante; not only was she involved in some of the most crucial decisions of war, but she exerted an influence over her husband and the Government that would appear scandalous to modern eyes. Yet her ability to charm Britain’s allies and her humanitarian efforts on the Home Front earned her deep respect, both behind closed doors in Whitehall and among the population at large. That Clementine should become Britain’s ‘First Lady’ was by no means pre-ordained. Born into impecunious aristocracy, her childhood was far from gilded. Her mother was a serial adulteress and gambler, who spent many years uprooting her children to escape the clutches of their erstwhile father, and by the time Clementine entered polite society she had become the target of cruel snobbery and rumours about her parentage. In Winston, however, she discovered a partner as emotionally insecure as herself, and in his career she found her mission. Her dedication to his cause may have had tragic consequences for their children, but theirs was a marriage that changed the course of history. Now, acclaimed biographer Sonia Purnell explores the peculiar dynamics of this fascinating union.

Lacework or Mirror? Diary Poetics of Frances Burney, Dorothy Wordsworth and Mary Shelley

Author: Magdalena Ożarska

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443855731

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 335

View: 1967


Lacework or Mirror? Diary Poetics of Frances Burney, Dorothy Wordsworth and Mary Shelley sets out to determine whether each of the diaries by three female writers – namely, Frances Burney, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Mary Shelley – approximates the Philippe-Lejeunean concept of the diary as lacework or the more sweeping view, typical of the broadly conceived autobiography, which Georges Gusdorf famously likened to the mirror. The author explores Burney’s, Wordsworth’s and Shelley’s attempts at concealing the gaps between their narrating and narrated ‘I’s, as well as examining their diary lacunae, especially helpful for illustrating the gradual emergence of the diarists’ individual selves. Broader issues, connected with diary poetics, such as the use of metaphors and symbols, the degree of reliance on dialogue and ensuing narrativity, down to handling the past by means of anachronous eccentricities, are also subject to examination. The study is based on the assumption that the journal is a literary genre, which can be investigated with tools routinely used for the examination of literary texts. Yet, beyond the issues of literariness, in accordance with Philippe Lejeune’s dictum, the three journals reveal the writers’ diaristic practices. In fact, it seems that issues of the journal genre and the journal practice cannot be divorced, and neither can their lacework and mirror aspects.

Prisoner for Polygamy

Author: Stan Larson

Publisher: Greg Kofford Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 262

View: 3169


Rudger Clawson (1857–1943) was the first Mormon convicted of being in violation of the Edmund–Tucker Act, which outlawed polygamy. Born into a polygamous family, Clawson married Florence Dinwoodey in August 1882, Lydia Spencer is March 1883, and eventually entered into a “post-Manifesto union” with Pearl Udall in 1904. Clawson, a prominent member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, served in the LDS Church as missionary, stake president, apostle, president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, and counselor in the First Presidency. This book delves into Clawson’s time as a “cohab” in the Utah Territorial Penitentiary, as well as a unique look at this time in Utah’s history. These prison memoirs and letters reflect the pride felt by Mormon polygamists imprisoned “for conscience sake” and include Mormon doctrinal discussions, details of their prison life, personal accounts of prison escape attempts, and the sense of frustration felt by the men as a result of being separated from their families. In addition, these memoirs show Clawson’s talent for storytelling and include select love letters written by Clawson to his plural wife, Lydia.

The Tokyo Trial

Author: N.A

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107060389

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 7127


This collection of essays represents a distinctively Chinese approach to the interpretation of the Tokyo Trial and its significance today.