Shopping, Seduction & Mr. Selfridge

Author: Lindy Woodhead

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 0812985044

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 0

View: 3760


If you lived at Downton Abbey, you shopped at Selfridge’s. Harry Gordon Selfridge was a charismatic American who, in twenty-five years working at Marshall Field’s in Chicago, rose from lowly stockboy to a partner in the business which his visionary skills had helped to create. At the turn of the twentieth century he brought his own American dream to London’s Oxford Street where, in 1909, with a massive burst of publicity, Harry opened Selfridge’s, England’s first truly modern built-for-purpose department store. Designed to promote shopping as a sensual and pleasurable experience, six acres of floor space offered what he called “everything that enters into the affairs of daily life,” as well as thrilling new luxuries—from ice-cream soda to signature perfumes. This magical emporium also featured Otis elevators, a bank, a rooftop garden with an ice-skating rink, and a restaurant complete with orchestra—all catering to customers from Anna Pavlova to Noel Coward. The store was “a theatre, with the curtain going up at nine o’clock.” Yet the real drama happened off the shop floor, where Mr. Selfridge navigated an extravagant world of mistresses, opulent mansions, racehorses, and an insatiable addiction to gambling. While his gloriously iconic store still stands, the man himself would ultimately come crashing down. The true story that inspired the Masterpiece series on PBS • Mr. Selfridge is a co-production of ITV Studios and Masterpiece “Enthralling . . . [an] energetic and wonderfully detailed biography.”—London Evening Standard “Will change your view of shopping forever.”—Vogue (U.K.)

Shopping, Seduction & Mr Selfridge

Author: Lindy Woodhead

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847659640

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 514

View: 5900


The basis for the hit TV show Mr Selfridge In 1909, the largest department store in London's West End, designed and built from scratch, opened in Oxford Street in a glorious burst of publicity. The mastermind behind the faade was American retail genius Harry Gordon Selfridge: maverick businessman, risk-taker, dandy and one of the greatest showmen the retail world has ever known. His talents were to create the seduction of shopping, and as his success and fame grew, so did his glittering lifestyle: mansions, yachts, gambling, racehorses - and mistresses. From the glamour of Edwardian England, through the turmoil of the Great War and the heady excesses of the 1920s and beyond, Selfridges Department Store was 'a theatre with the curtain going up at 9 o'clock each morning'. Mr Selfridge reveals the captivating story of the rise and fall of the man who revolutionised the way we shop. 'Lively and entertaining' Sunday Telegraph 'Will change your view of shopping forever' Vogue 'Harry Selfridge revolutionised the way we shop ... fascinating' Daily Mail

The World of Mr Selfridge

Author: Alison Maloney

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1471138852

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 7855


With love affairs, class issues, glamour, great story-telling and social history, Mr Selfridgeis the biggest budget ITV-produced drama of all time. Beginning in 1909, Mr Selfridge follows a colourful cast of characters whose lives and fortunes are entangled with the founder of the magnificent department store. An American retail visionary, Harry Selfridge moved to London in 1906 with his family to build and open the most ambitious department store the world had ever seen. The drama is set at a time when women were revelling in a new sense of freedom and modernity. Harry wanted to indulge, empower and celebrate these women and so opened the doors of his opulent department store on London's famous Oxford Street, changing the way the British shopped forever. This lavishly illustrated book is the official companion to the series. Written with a foreword by series producer Andrew Davies, the book takes fans on a journey through the world of Harry Gordon Selfridge. Rich with historical detail it explores the man himself, his relationship with his family as well as the store, its departments and changing fashions in the early twentieth century. Complete with hundreds of high quality photographs it takes a closer look at the cast and their characters before looking ahead to series three which will pick up in 1919, the point at which Harry's life really begins to unravel.

Selfridge

Author: Fergus Mason

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN: 1629172928

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 110

View: 7404


Just for a moment try to put every shopping trip you’ve ever made out of your head. Imagine a different world. Imagine that all the goods for sale are locked away in cabinets and to handle them, or even to examine them closely, you need to ask a shop assistant to open it up for you. Imagine that within seconds of entering a store a floorwalker approaches you and asks if you’re planning to buy something – then, when you say “I’m just looking,” rudely tells you to leave. Imagine any attempt to return faulty or unsuitable goods being met with ridicule, obstruction or a flat refusal to help you. Until the late 19th century people didn’t have to imagine that; it was reality. For anyone alive today a visit to the average store back then would convince you that they didn’t really want to sell you anything. The idea of customer service was an alien one. Stores sold things. If you wanted to buy them, fine. If you didn’t they weren’t really interested. Browsing was strongly discouraged and impulse buys were almost unheard of. Shopping was something you did when you had to. It certainly wasn’t something anyone enjoyed. Then, in the late 1880s, one man came along and changed all that. His name was Harry Gordon Selfridge and this is the story of his life.

Shopping, Seduction and Mr Selfridge

Author: Lindy Woodhead

Publisher: Profile Books(GB)

ISBN: 9781861971692

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 0

View: 8145


When the visionary American retailer Harry Gordon Selfridge, rightfully known as 'the showman of shopping', moved from Chicago to open his eponymous store in Oxford Street, he brought with him his heartfelt belief in the sex appeal of shopping. In the process Selfridge became rich and famous, But his weakness for high living: fast women, grand houses, extravagant entertaining and an insatiable addiction to gambling, brought about his downfall. Thirty years after he opened his revolutionary store, Harry Gordon Selfridge was ousted in a Board Room coup. In 1947, he died virtually penniless in a small flat in Putney. His memorial is in Oxford Street, where the towering Ionic columns of Selfridges stand witness to the achievement of his dreams. In this book, which explores the rise of twentieth-century consumerism, Lindy Woodhead tells the extraordinary story of a revolution in shopping and the rise and fall of a retail prince.

Media Representations of Retail Work in America

Author: Brittany R. Clark

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1666906395

Category: Department stores in popular culture

Page: 153

View: 1802


Media Representations of Retail Work in America examines the ways in which retail workers have been portrayed in popular culture texts from the early 20th century to the 21st century.

Wardrobe Crisis

Author: Clare Press

Publisher: Black Inc.

ISBN: 1863958355

Category: Design

Page: 336

View: 9872


Who makes your clothes? This used to be an easy question to answer: it was the seamstress next door, or the tailor on the high street – or you made them yourself. Today we rarely know the origins of the clothes hanging in our closets. The local shoemaker, dressmaker and milliner are long gone, replaced by a globalised fashion industry worth $1.5 trillion a year. In Wardrobe Crisis, fashion journalist Clare Press explores the history and ethics behind what we wear. Putting her insider status to good use, Press examines the entire fashion ecosystem, from sweatshops to haute couture, unearthing the roots of today’s buy-and-discard culture. She traces the origins of icons like Chanel, Dior and Hermès; charts the rise and fall of the department store; and follows the thread that led us from Marie Antoinette to Carrie Bradshaw. From a time when Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein were just two boys from the Bronx, to the world of the global fashion juggernaut, where Zara’s parent company produces more than 900 million garments annually, Press takes us on an insider’s journey of discovery and revelation. Wardrobe Crisis is a witty and persuasive argument for a fashion revolution that will empower you to feel good about your wardrobe again.

Edwardians on Screen

Author: Katherine Byrne

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137467894

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 173

View: 1628


This book explores television's current fascination with the Edwardian era. By exploring popular period dramas such as Downton Abbey , it examines how the early twentieth century is represented on our screens, and what these shows tell us about class, gender and politics, both past and present.

Shopomania

Author: Paul Berton

Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

ISBN: 1771623357

Category: Social Science

Page: 356

View: 5067


A thought-provoking and provocative challenge to consumerism (with plenty of name-dropping and celebrity antics). Sassy and satirical, Shopomania is an economic, environmental and social study. This light-hearted, dark-souled dictionary of coined words, or “shoponyms,” takes readers on a roller-coaster ride of avaricious antics and outrageous profligacy. Shopping in one form or another has existed for millennia but, aside from a few slumps, each generation has outdone the previous one. In the past fifty years, shopping—and its associated carbon footprint—has grown exponentially. Berton argues that if we invented today’s consumer culture, then we can invent something to replace it. We can do a better job of making the cycle of stuff truly circular rather than linear. We can be more environmentally, socially and politically conscious of what we buy and how it comes to us—and where it will go after we are finished with it. A species that has made shopping ubiquitous can figure all these things out with little more than co-operation and creativity, and by asking if it is really necessary to “own it now” as we have been told—endlessly—since childhood. Must we possess a thing to enjoy it? Do we really need all that stuff?