Shopping, Seduction & Mr Selfridge

Author: Lindy Woodhead

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1847659640

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 514

View: 8247


The basis for the hit TV show Mr Selfridge In 1909, the largest department store in London's West End, designed and built from scratch, opened in Oxford Street in a glorious burst of publicity. The mastermind behind the faade was American retail genius Harry Gordon Selfridge: maverick businessman, risk-taker, dandy and one of the greatest showmen the retail world has ever known. His talents were to create the seduction of shopping, and as his success and fame grew, so did his glittering lifestyle: mansions, yachts, gambling, racehorses - and mistresses. From the glamour of Edwardian England, through the turmoil of the Great War and the heady excesses of the 1920s and beyond, Selfridges Department Store was 'a theatre with the curtain going up at 9 o'clock each morning'. Mr Selfridge reveals the captivating story of the rise and fall of the man who revolutionised the way we shop. 'Lively and entertaining' Sunday Telegraph 'Will change your view of shopping forever' Vogue 'Harry Selfridge revolutionised the way we shop ... fascinating' Daily Mail

The World of Mr Selfridge

Author: Alison Maloney

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1471138852

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 9771


With love affairs, class issues, glamour, great story-telling and social history, Mr Selfridgeis the biggest budget ITV-produced drama of all time. Beginning in 1909, Mr Selfridge follows a colourful cast of characters whose lives and fortunes are entangled with the founder of the magnificent department store. An American retail visionary, Harry Selfridge moved to London in 1906 with his family to build and open the most ambitious department store the world had ever seen. The drama is set at a time when women were revelling in a new sense of freedom and modernity. Harry wanted to indulge, empower and celebrate these women and so opened the doors of his opulent department store on London's famous Oxford Street, changing the way the British shopped forever. This lavishly illustrated book is the official companion to the series. Written with a foreword by series producer Andrew Davies, the book takes fans on a journey through the world of Harry Gordon Selfridge. Rich with historical detail it explores the man himself, his relationship with his family as well as the store, its departments and changing fashions in the early twentieth century. Complete with hundreds of high quality photographs it takes a closer look at the cast and their characters before looking ahead to series three which will pick up in 1919, the point at which Harry's life really begins to unravel.

Selfridge

Author: Fergus Mason

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN: 1629172928

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 110

View: 3561


Just for a moment try to put every shopping trip you’ve ever made out of your head. Imagine a different world. Imagine that all the goods for sale are locked away in cabinets and to handle them, or even to examine them closely, you need to ask a shop assistant to open it up for you. Imagine that within seconds of entering a store a floorwalker approaches you and asks if you’re planning to buy something – then, when you say “I’m just looking,” rudely tells you to leave. Imagine any attempt to return faulty or unsuitable goods being met with ridicule, obstruction or a flat refusal to help you. Until the late 19th century people didn’t have to imagine that; it was reality. For anyone alive today a visit to the average store back then would convince you that they didn’t really want to sell you anything. The idea of customer service was an alien one. Stores sold things. If you wanted to buy them, fine. If you didn’t they weren’t really interested. Browsing was strongly discouraged and impulse buys were almost unheard of. Shopping was something you did when you had to. It certainly wasn’t something anyone enjoyed. Then, in the late 1880s, one man came along and changed all that. His name was Harry Gordon Selfridge and this is the story of his life.

1001 TV Series

Author: Paul Condon

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1788400461

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 960

View: 8122


This is the ultimate book for the Netflix and boxset generation, featuring all the greatest drama series ever broadcast as well as the weirdest game shows, controversial reality TV experiments and breathtaking nature documentaries. It is a must for anyone who wants to know why India's Ramayan is legendary, why Roots was groundbreaking, or what the ending of Lost was all about. Written by an international team of critics, authors, academics, producers and journalists, this book reviews TV series from more than 20 countries, highlights classic episodes to watch and also provides cast summaries and production details.

Edwardians on Screen

Author: Katherine Byrne

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137467894

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 173

View: 3317


This book explores television's current fascination with the Edwardian era. By exploring popular period dramas such as Downton Abbey , it examines how the early twentieth century is represented on our screens, and what these shows tell us about class, gender and politics, both past and present.

Wardrobe Crisis

Author: Clare Press

Publisher: Black Inc.

ISBN: 1863958355

Category: Design

Page: 336

View: 3423


Who makes your clothes? This used to be an easy question to answer: it was the seamstress next door, or the tailor on the high street – or you made them yourself. Today we rarely know the origins of the clothes hanging in our closets. The local shoemaker, dressmaker and milliner are long gone, replaced by a globalised fashion industry worth $1.5 trillion a year. In Wardrobe Crisis, fashion journalist Clare Press explores the history and ethics behind what we wear. Putting her insider status to good use, Press examines the entire fashion ecosystem, from sweatshops to haute couture, unearthing the roots of today’s buy-and-discard culture. She traces the origins of icons like Chanel, Dior and Hermès; charts the rise and fall of the department store; and follows the thread that led us from Marie Antoinette to Carrie Bradshaw. From a time when Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein were just two boys from the Bronx, to the world of the global fashion juggernaut, where Zara’s parent company produces more than 900 million garments annually, Press takes us on an insider’s journey of discovery and revelation. Wardrobe Crisis is a witty and persuasive argument for a fashion revolution that will empower you to feel good about your wardrobe again.

Adapting Television Drama

Author: Christopher Hogg

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 1137501774

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 263

View: 7672


This book explores adaptation in its various forms in contemporary television drama. It considers the mechanics of adaptation as an ever-more prevalent form of production, most notably in the reworking of literary sources for television. It also explores the broader process through which the television industry as a whole is currently making necessary adaptations in how it tells stories, especially in relation to important concerns of equality, diversity and inclusion. Offering and analysing 16 original interviews with leading British television producers, writers, directors, production designers, casting directors and actors, and with a particular focus on female and/or minority-ethnic industry perspectives, the book examines some of the key professional and creative approaches behind television adaptations today. The book connects these industry insights to the existing conceptual and critical frameworks of television studies and adaptation studies, illuminating the unique characteristics of television adaptation as a material mode of production, and revealing television itself as an inherently adaptive artform.

London's West End

Author: Rohan McWilliam

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019255641X

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 984


How did the West End of London become the world's leading pleasure district? What is the source of its magnetic appeal? How did the centre of London become Theatreland? London's West End, 1800-1914 is the first ever history of the area which has enthralled millions. The reader will discover the growth of theatres, opera houses, galleries, restaurants, department stores, casinos, exhibition centres, night clubs, street life, and the sex industry. The area from the Strand to Oxford Street came to stand for sensation and vulgarity but also the promotion of high culture. The West End produced shows and fashions whose impact rippled outwards around the globe. During the nineteenth century, an area that serviced the needs of the aristocracy was opened up to a wider public whilst retaining the imprint of luxury and prestige. Rohan McWilliam tells the story of the great artists, actors and entrepreneurs who made the West End: figures such as Gilbert and Sullivan, the playwright Dion Boucicault, the music hall artiste Jenny Hill, and the American Harry Gordon Selfridge who wanted to create the best shop in the world. At the same time, McWilliam explores the distinctive spaces created in the West End, from the glamour of Drury Lane and Covent Garden, through to low life bars and taverns. We encounter the origins of the modern star system and celebrity culture. London's West End, 1800-1914 moves from the creation of Regent Street to the glory days of the Edwardian period when the West End was the heart of empire and the entertainment industry. Much of modern culture and consumer society was shaped by a relatively small area in the middle of London. This pioneering study establishes why that was.