The Age of Light, Soap, and Water

Author: Mariana Valverde

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 080209595X

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 3777


" BACK IN PRINT WITH A NEW INTRODUCTION The turn of the last century saw a greatwave of moral fervour among Protestant social reformers in English Canada.Their targets for moral reform were various: sex hygiene, immigration policy,slum clearance, prostitution, and "whiteslavery." Mariana Valverde's groundbreaking TheAge of Light, Soap, and Water examines the work and the ideas of moralistclergy, social workers, politicians, and bureaucrats who sought to maintain - orcreate - a white Protestant Canada. The morality idealized by evangelical,feminist, and medical activists was not, as is often assumed, completely repressiveand puritanical. On the contrary, the self-defined social purity movement atthe centre of this book talked endlessly about sex in order to create a healthsexuality among both native-born and immigrant Canadians. Sexual health was linkedto racial purity, and both of these were in turn linked to efforts to abolishurban slums by means of symbolic as well as physical "light, soap, andwater." Back in print with a new introduction by the author, this classicwork offers fascinating insights on the social history of Canada. "learance, prostitution, and "white slavery." Mariana Valverde's groundbreaking The Age of Light, Soap, and Waterexamines the work and the ideas of moralist clergy, social workers, politicians, and bureaucrats who sought to maintain - or create - a white Protestant Canada. The morality idealized by evangelical, feminist, and medical activists was not, as is often assumed, completely repressive and puritanical. On the contrary, the self-defined social purity movement at the centre of this book talked endlessly about sex in order to create a healthy sexuality among both native-born and immigrant Canadians. Sexual health was linked to racial purity, and both of these were in turn linked to efforts to abolish urban slums by means of symbolic as well as physical "light, soap, and water." This study uncovers a little known dimension of Canadian social history and shows that moral reform was not the project of a marginal puritanical group but was central to the race, class, and gender organization of modern English Canada.

The Age of Light

Author: Whitney Scharer

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1509889116

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 7376


For fans of Mrs Hemingway and The Paris Wife, Whitney Scharer's The Age of Light is the riveting, vivid and powerful story of the photographer Lee Miller and her lover, Man Ray. Model. Muse. Lover. Artist. Paris, 1929. Lee Miller has abandoned her life in New York and a modelling career at Vogue to pursue her dream of becoming a photographer. When she catches the eye of artist Man Ray she convinces him to hire her as his assistant. Man is an egotistical, charismatic force and they soon embark upon a passionate affair. Lee and Man spend their days working closely in the studio and their nights at smoky cabarets and wild parties. But as Lee begins to assert herself, and to create pioneering work of her own, Man's jealousy spirals out of control and leads to a betrayal that threatens to destroy them both . . . ‘Powerful, sensual and gripping’ - Madeleine Miller, author of Circe ‘Fans of Mrs Hemingway and The Paris Wife will love this one’ - Elle

The Age of Light

Author: Donald Wetzel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 328

View: 1431


The Age of Absolutism (eBook)

Author: Tim McNeese

Publisher: Lorenz Educational Press

ISBN: 0787781258

Category: History

Page: 36

View: 9611


"The Age of Absolutism" (1650—1789) covers the final years of the last great European monarchies and the divestiture of monarchical power through reform and revolution. Emphasis is given to the absolute reign of Louis XIV of France, and the growth of constitutional monarchy in late-17th century England. Enlightenment thinkers, such as Voltaire, Rousseau, and Locke, and their theorectical impact on the unraveling of royal power and the revolutions in France and America are discussed. Challenging map exercises and provocative review questions encourage meaningful reflection and historical analysis. Tests and answer keys included.

A Cultural History of Objects in the Age of Enlightenment

Author: Audrey Horning

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 135022667X

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 8456


A Cultural History of Objects in the Age of Enlightenment covers the period 1600 to 1760, a time marked by the movement of people, ideas and goods. The objects explored in this volume –from scientific instrumentation and Baroque paintings to slave ships and shackles –encapsulate the contradictory impulses of the age. The entwined forces of capitalism and colonialism created new patterns of consumption, facilitated by innovations in maritime transport, new forms of exchange relations, and the exploitation of non-Western peoples and lands. The world of objects in the Enlightenment reveal a Western material culture profoundly shaped by global encounters. The 6 volume set of the Cultural History of Objects examines how objects have been created, used, interpreted and set loose in the world over the last 2500 years. Over this time, the West has developed particular attitudes to the material world, at the centre of which is the idea of the object. The themes covered in each volume are objecthood; technology; economic objects; everyday objects; art; architecture; bodily objects; object worlds. Audrey Horning is Professor at William & Mary, USA, and at Queen's University Belfast, UK. Volume 4 in the Cultural History of Objects set. General Editors: Dan Hicks and William Whyte

The Age of Entanglement

Author: Louisa Gilder

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030727036X

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 8038


In The Age of Entanglement, Louisa Gilder brings to life one of the pivotal debates in twentieth century physics. In 1935, Albert Einstein famously showed that, according to the quantum theory, separated particles could act as if intimately connected–a phenomenon which he derisively described as “spooky action at a distance.” In that same year, Erwin Schrödinger christened this correlation “entanglement.” Yet its existence was mostly ignored until 1964, when the Irish physicist John Bell demonstrated just how strange this entanglement really was. Drawing on the papers, letters, and memoirs of the twentieth century’s greatest physicists, Gilder both humanizes and dramatizes the story by employing the scientists’ own words in imagined face-to-face dialogues. The result is a richly illuminating exploration of one of the most exciting concepts of quantum physics.

The Age of Everything

Author: Matthew Hedman

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226322947

Category: Science

Page: 264

View: 1854


Taking advantage of recent advances throughout the sciences, Matthew Hedman brings the distant past closer to us than it has ever been. Here, he shows how scientists have determined the age of everything from the colonization of the New World over 13,000 years ago to the origin of the universe nearly fourteen billion years ago. Hedman details, for example, how interdisciplinary studies of the Great Pyramids of Egypt can determine exactly when and how these incredible structures were built. He shows how the remains of humble trees can illuminate how the surface of the sun has changed over the past ten millennia. And he also explores how the origins of the earth, solar system, and universe are being discerned with help from rocks that fall from the sky, the light from distant stars, and even the static seen on television sets. Covering a wide range of time scales, from the Big Bang to human history, The Age of Everything is a provocative and far-ranging look at how science has determined the age of everything from modern mammals to the oldest stars, and will be indispensable for all armchair time travelers. “We are used to being told confidently of an enormous, measurable past: that some collection of dusty bones is tens of thousands of years old, or that astronomical bodies have an age of some billions. But how exactly do scientists come to know these things? That is the subject of this quite fascinating book. . . . As told by Hedman, an astronomer, each story is a marvel of compressed exegesis that takes into account some of the most modern and intriguing hypotheses.”—Steven Poole, Guardian “Hedman is worth reading because he is careful to present both the power and peril of trying to extract precise chronological data. These are all very active areas of study, and as you read Hedman you begin to see how researchers have to be both very careful and incredibly audacious, and how much of our understanding of ourselves—through history, through paleontology, through astronomy—depends on determining the age of everything.”—Anthony Doerr, Boston Globe

The Sophia Teachings

Author: Robert Powell

Publisher: Lantern Books

ISBN: 9781930051522

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 166

View: 8517


Powell surveys the wonders and teachings associated with this treasure from Christianity's mystical past, spanning the Greek philosophers, King Solomon, Hildegard von Bingen, Our Lady of Guadalupe, and the Virgin Mary.

Military Experience in the Age of Reason

Author: Christopher Duffy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135794596

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 5390


First published in 1987. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.