The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky

Author: Waslaw Nijinsky,Vaslaw Nijinsky

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520009455

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 187

View: 5229


00 Vaslav Nijinsky (1890-1950), the "God of Dance," was on the verge of a mental breakdown when he wrote this diary as an outlet for his views on religion, art, love, and life. The diary provides unique insight into the inner life of a highly gifted but mentally disturbed creative genius. Vaslav Nijinsky (1890-1950), the "God of Dance," was on the verge of a mental breakdown when he wrote this diary as an outlet for his views on religion, art, love, and life. The diary provides unique insight into the inner life of a highly gifted but mentally disturbed creative genius.

The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky

Author: Vaslaw Nijinsky,Waslaw Nijinsky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 187

View: 8202


The Diary of Vaslav Nijinsky

Author: Waslaw Nijinsky,Joan Ross Acocella,Kyril Fitzlyon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780252073625

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 311

View: 626


In his prime, Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950) was the most celebrated man in Western ballet--a virtuoso and a dramatic dancer such as European and American audiences had never seen before. After his triumphs in such works as the Specter of the Rose and Petrouchka, he set out to make ballets of his own, and with his Afternoon of a Faun And The Rite of Spring, created within a year of each other, he became ballet's first modernist choreographer. Then, still in his twenties, he began to go mad. For six weeks in early 1919, As his tie to reality was giving way, Nijinsky kept a diary--the only sustained daily record we have, by a major artist, Of the experience of entering psychosis. In some entries he is filled with hope. He is God; he will save the world. In other entries, he falls into a black despair. He is dogged by sexual obsessions and grief over World War I. Furthermore, he is afraid that he is going insane. The diary was first published in 1936, In a version heavily bowdlerized by Nijinsky's wife. The new edition, translated by Kyril FitzLyon, Is the first complete and accurate English rendering of this searing document. In her introduction, noted dance critic Joan Acocella tells Nijinsky's story and places it in the context of early European modernism. Joan Acocella is the dance critic forThe New Yorker. She is the author ofMark MorrisandCreating Hysteria: Women and Multiple Personality Disorder

A Smile in His Mind's Eye

Author: Ray Morrison

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 0802089399

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 529

View: 5733


Durrell's best-known work fused Western notions of time and space with Eastern metaphysics. Very little has been written about Durrell's work before the Second World War. With "A Smile in His Mind's Eye," Ray Morrison seeks to redress this neglect.

The Portrait of an Artist as a Pathographer: On Writing Illnesses and Illnesses in Writing

Author: Jayjit Sarkar,Jagannath Basu

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN: 164889271X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 323

View: 5482


Focusing on the various intersections between illness and literature across time and space, The Portrait of an Artist as a Pathographer seeks to understand how ontological, phenomenological and epistemological experiences of illness have been dealt with and represented in literary writings and literary studies. In this volume, scholars from across the world have come together to understand how the pathological condition of being ill (the sufferers), as well as the pathologists dealing with the ill (the healers and caregivers), have shaped literary works. The language of medical science, with its jargon, and the language of the every day, with its emphasis on utility, prove equally insufficient and futile in capturing the pain and suffering of illness. It is this insufficiency and futility that makes us turn towards the canonical works of Joseph Conrad, Samuel Beckett, William Carlos Williams, Virginia Woolf, Kazuo Ishiguro, Miroslav Holub as well as the non-canonical António Lobo Antunes, Yumemakura Baku, Wopko Jensma and Vaslav Nijinsky. This volume helps in understanding and capturing the metalanguage of illness while presenting us with the tradition of ‘writing pain’. In an effort to expand the definition of pathography to include those who are on the other side of pain, the essays in this collection aim to portray the above-mentioned pathographers as artists, turning the anxiety and suffering of illness into an art form. Looking deeply into such creative aspects of illness, this book also seeks to evoke the possibility of pathography as world literature. This book will be of particular interest to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students, as well as scholars of literature and medical humanities who are interested in the intersections between literary studies and medical science.

Modern Art and the Remaking of Human Disposition

Author: Emmelyn Butterfield-Rosen

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022674518X

Category: Art

Page: 352

View: 1377


How artists at the turn of the twentieth century broke with traditional ways of posing the bodies of human figures to reflect modern understandings of human consciousness. With this book, Emmelyn Butterfield-Rosen brings a new formal and conceptual rubric to the study of turn-of-the-century modernism, transforming our understanding of the era’s canonical works. Butterfield-Rosen analyzes a hitherto unexamined formal phenomenon in European art: how artists departed from conventions for posing the human figure that had long been standard. In the decades around 1900, artists working in different countries and across different media began to present human figures in strictly frontal, lateral, and dorsal postures. The effect, both archaic and modern, broke with the centuries-old tradition of rendering bodies in torsion, with poses designed to simulate the human being’s physical volume and capacity for autonomous thought and movement. This formal departure destabilized prevailing visual codes for signifying the existence of the inner life of the human subject. Exploring major works by Georges Seurat, Gustav Klimt, and the dancer and choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky— replete with new archival discoveries—Modern Art and the Remaking of Human Disposition combines intensive formal analysis with inquiries into the history of psychology and evolutionary biology. In doing so, it shows how modern understandings of human consciousness and the relation of mind to body were materialized in art through a new vocabulary of postures and poses.