The Great Depression: A Diary

Author: Benjamin Roth

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 9781586489014

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 1511


When the stock market crashed in 1929, Benjamin Roth was a young lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio. After he began to grasp the magnitude of what had happened to American economic life, he decided to set down his impressions in his diary. This collection of those entries reveals another side of the Great Depression—one lived through by ordinary, middle-class Americans, who on a daily basis grappled with a swiftly changing economy coupled with anxiety about the unknown future. Roth's depiction of life in time of widespread foreclosures, a schizophrenic stock market, political unrest and mass unemployment seem to speak directly to readers today.

The Great Depression: A Diary

Author: Benjamin Roth

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1586488376

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 890


When the stock market crashed in 1929, Benjamin Roth was a young lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio. After he began to grasp the magnitude of what had happened to American economic life, he decided to set down his impressions in his diary. This collection of those entries reveals another side of the Great Depression—one lived through by ordinary, middle-class Americans, who on a daily basis grappled with a swiftly changing economy coupled with anxiety about the unknown future. Roth's depiction of life in time of widespread foreclosures, a schizophrenic stock market, political unrest and mass unemployment seem to speak directly to readers today.

Not a Nickel to Spare

Author: Perry Nodelman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780439961301

Category: Antisemitism

Page: 218

View: 2728


Coping with being poor during the Depression is hard enough, but Sally also has to contend with anti-Jewish sentiment when she ventures outside her familiar neighbourhood near Toronto's Kensington Market. Her cousin Benny is always getting into scrapes or dragging Sally into his hare-brained schemes. But it's also Benny who tries to open Sally's eyes to the wider world, telling her about Hitler's rise in Europe and urging her to stand up for herself when she comes across anti-Semitism. A historical note gives readers the background of the Depression, which hit Canada harder than most other countries. It also describes the way Jews were treated in Canada. Today's readers might be surprised to know that there were people in Toronto who prided themselves on being part of The Swastika Club. A map, photographs and documents provide a visual context for the story.

Financial Structures and Regulation: A Comparison of Crises in the UK, USA and Italy

Author: A. Roselli

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230346669

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 3618


A survey of past financial crises, starting with the great banking collapses of the interwar period. The current turmoil has prompted a number of questions regarding both its origins and ways to avoid its repetition. The historical background and the evolving institutional framework of banking and financial systems are at the center of this book.

Reasonably Simple Economics

Author: Evan Osborne

Publisher: Apress

ISBN: 1430259418

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 332

View: 8087


The goal of Reasonably Simple Economics is, not surprisingly, simple: to help us think like economists. When we do, so much of the world that seemed mysterious or baffling becomes more clear and understandable—improving our lives and providing new tools to succeed in business and career. In a chatty style, economist Evan Osborne explains the economic foundations behind the things we read about or see in the news everyday: Why prices for goods and services are what they are How government spending, regulation, and taxation can both hinder and help the economy Why and how some people get fabulously rich How entrepreneurs reorganize society beneficially Why markets sometimes fail and when or if governments should intervene when they do How economics and statistics can explain such things as discrimination in hiring and providing services (and why discriminators are shooting themselves in the foot), why we’re smarter than we’ve ever been, and how technology makes the idea of Earth’s “carrying capacity” meaningless Along the way, you will learn the basic concepts of economics that well-educated citizens in democratic countries should know, like scarcity, opportunity cost, supply and demand, all the different ways economies are "managed," and more. In the manner of The Armchair Economist, The Undercover Economist, or Naked Economics, Osborne uses current examples to illustrate the principles that underlie tragedies like the Greek economy or the global market meltdown of 2008, and triumphs like the continuing dominance of Silicon Valley in the tech world or why New York City markets are stuffed with goods despite the difficulty in getting them there. As Osborne points out, the future, in economic terms, has always been better than the past, and he shows you how to use that knowledge to improve your life both intellectually and materially. What you’ll learn How to think like an economist and better understand the world and your place in it Basic economic concepts like supply and demand and marginal costs and benefits How and why people “respond to incentives,” and why this is a life-changing idea Why “the crowd” is invariably wise and what to learn from it Why speculators and "middlemen" improve life not just for themselves but for the rest of us Why living standards have risen dramatically in the last century and why they will continue to as time marches on Why taking advantage of "decentralized knowledge" to pounce on opportunity is critical for your success Who this book is for The audience for this book is anyone who wants to know answers to such questions as why the price of gasoline rises and falls dramatically, whether we are in fact “mortgaging our children’s future” through deficit spending, what the economic principles behind every great fortune are, and anything else governed by the principles of economics (which is most things). Table of Contents Introduction Supply and Demand, Considered Separately Supply and Demand, Considered Together The Economics of Information or Knowledge Public and Private Decision Making Who Makes How Much, and Why The Middleman and the Entrepreneur Time and Risk The Entrepreneur and Some Economics of the Future The Things Only Government Can Do Macroeconomics: The Big, Often Blurry Picture Macroeconomics: Stabilizing the Economy, or Not Macroeconomics: The Short and the Long Runs

Christmas After All

Author: Kathryn Lasky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780439219433

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 182

View: 2515


Minnie Swift is 12 when the great Depression hits, so she keeps a diary during the Christmas season to reflect the tough times, and hopeful times, she and her family go through.

When the Bubble Bursts

Author: Hilliard MacBeth

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 1459742044

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 4382


Hilliard MacBeth argues that investors should stop thinking about real estate as a safe investment, warning that it is only a matter of time before Canada faces a housing crisis of major proportions. He guides investors towards safer and more lucrative investments in order to protect their assets and ensure a comfortable retirement.

Depression Diaries. Dorothea Lange and her Documentary Photography Work during the Great Depression in America

Author: N.A

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3668941319

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 24

View: 6982


Seminar paper from the year 2018 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,7, University of Koblenz-Landau, language: English, abstract: In diaries, people reflect their own reality and their individual feelings. There are no lies, and even if others would state there are, the diary’s owner would still reject that, claiming that the reputed lies are their own reality. Hence, diaries are considered as somehow reporting the truth, or at least one kind of individual truth. Yet what about Dorothea Lange’s photographs of the Great Depression? Are they the actual truth or are they her interpretation? One says that a picture is worth a thousand words. People have an idea of what the Great Depression in America looked like, owed to different photographers who portrayed both economic and cultural consequences of the global crisis. One of those photographers was Dorothea Lange. In a first examination of her work documenting the people behind the Great Depression in America, I quickly noticed that critics are either in favour of, or against Lange’s photographic work. Since I could not agree with either position, I decided that I want to find my own. By studying and examining different photographs both in the context of the Great Depression and the traditional idea behind documentary photography, I finally discovered what I think of her work. Beginning her career as a documentary photographer, Lange acted as a silent observer behind the camera. She recorded what America’s people had to suffer during the depression process without any editing or staging. Yet throughout the years, Lange increasingly went astray the path of documentary photography’s basic concepts. Correspondingly, I argue that Dorothea Lange in some of the presented works succeeded in recording reality according to the standard set of photojournalism. However, in others she disregarded or even broke unwritten rules of documentary photography.