The Invention of Murder

Author: Judith Flanders

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN: 9781250048530

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 5965


THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER "Wonderful... [Flanders] shines in her readings of literary novels containing criminal and detective elements, such as Oliver Twist, Mary Barton and Tess of the D'Urbervilles, but can be sharp and very funny about the vagaries of melodramatic and sensational plotting." –Wall Street Journal In this fascinating exploration of murder in the nineteenth century, Judith Flanders examines some of the most gripping cases that captivated the Victorians and gave rise to the first detective fiction Murder in Britain in the nineteenth century was rare. But murder as sensation and entertainment became ubiquitous, transformed into novels, into broadsides and ballads, into theatre and melodrama and opera—even into puppet shows and performing dog-acts. Detective fiction and England's new police force developed in parallel, each imitating the other—the pioneers of Scotland Yard gave rise to Dickens's Inspector Bucket, the first fictional police detective, who in turn influenced Sherlock Holmes and, ultimately, even P.D. James and Patricia Cornwell. In this fascinating book, Judith Flanders retells the gruesome stories of many different types of murder—both famous and obscure—from the crimes (and myths) of Sweeney Todd and Jack the Ripper to the tragedies of the murdered Marr family in London's East End; Burke and Hare and their bodysnatching business in Edinburgh; and Greenacre, who transported his dismembered fiancée around town by omnibus. With an irresistible cast of swindlers, forgers, and poisoners, the mad, the bad and the dangerous to know, The Invention of Murder is both a gripping tale of crime and punishment, and history at its most readable.

Gothic Fiction and the Invention of Terrorism

Author: Joseph Crawford

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472509951

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 2041


Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2014 This book examines the connections between the growth of'terror fiction' - the genre now known as 'Gothic' - in the late eighteenthcentury, and the simultaneous appearance of the conceptual origins of'terrorism' as a category of political action. In the 1790s, Crawford argues, fourinter-connected bodies of writing arose in Britain: the historical mythology ofthe French Revolution, the political rhetoric of 'terrorism', the genre ofpolitical conspiracy theory, and the literary genre of Gothic fiction, known atthe time as 'terrorist novel writing'. All four bodies of writing drew heavilyupon one another, in order to articulate their shared sense of the radical andmonstrous otherness of the extremes of human evil, a sense which was quite newto the eighteenth century, but has remained central to the ways in which wehave thought and written about evil and violence ever since.

The Classical Plot and the Invention of Western Narrative

Author: N. J. Lowe

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139428306

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 445


From Homer to Hollywood, the western storytelling tradition has canonised a distinctive set of narrative values characterised by tight economy and closure. This book traces the formation of that classical paradigm in the development of ancient storytelling from Homer to Heliodorus. To tell this story, the book sets out to rehabilitate the idea of 'plot', notoriously disconnected from any recognised system of terminology in literary theory. The first part of the book draws on developments in narratology and cognitive science to propose a way of formally describing the way stories are structured and understood. This model is then used to write a history of the emergence of the classical plot type in the four ancient genres that shaped it - Homeric epic, fifth-century tragedy, New Comedy, and the Greek novel - with insights into the fundamental narrative poetics of each.

The Greek Polis and the Invention of Democracy

Author: Johann P. Arnason,Kurt A. Raaflaub,Peter Wagner

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118561678

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6255


The Greek Polis and the Invention of Democracy presents aseries of essays that trace the Greeks’ path to democracy andexamine the connection between the Greek polis as a citizenstate and democracy as well as the interaction between democracyand various forms of cultural expression from a comparativehistorical perspective and with special attention to the place ofGreek democracy in political thought and debates about democracythroughout the centuries. Presents an original combination of a close synchronic and longdiachronic examination of the Greek polis - city-states thatgave rise to the first democratic system of government Offers a detailed study of the close interactionbetweendemocracy, society, and the arts in ancient Greece Places the invention of democracy in fifth-century bce Athensboth in its broad social and cultural context and in the context ofthe re-emergence of democracy in the modern world Reveals the role Greek democracy played in the political andintellectual traditions that shaped modern democracy, and in thedebates about democracy in modern social, political, andphilosophical thought Written collaboratively by an international team of leadingscholars in classics, ancient history, sociology, and politicalscience

The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages

Author: Geraldine Heng

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108397263

Category: Political Science

Page: 510

View: 6738


In The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages, Geraldine Heng questions the common assumption that the concepts of race and racisms only began in the modern era. Examining Europe's encounters with Jews, Muslims, Africans, Native Americans, Mongols, and the Romani ('Gypsies'), from the 12th through 15th centuries, she shows how racial thinking, racial law, racial practices, and racial phenomena existed in medieval Europe before a recognizable vocabulary of race emerged in the West. Analysing sources in a variety of media, including stories, maps, statuary, illustrations, architectural features, history, saints' lives, religious commentary, laws, political and social institutions, and literature, she argues that religion - so much in play again today - enabled the positing of fundamental differences among humans that created strategic essentialisms to mark off human groups and populations for racialized treatment. Her ground-breaking study also shows how race figured in the emergence of homo europaeus and the identity of Western Europe in this time.

The Female Thermometer : Eighteenth-Century Culture and the Invention of the Uncanny

Author: Terry Castle Professor of English Stanford University

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198024274

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 294

View: 3511


A collection of the author's essays on the history and development of female identity from the 18th to the early 20th centuries. Throughout the book are woven themes which are constant in Castle's work: fantasy, hallucination, travesty, transgression and sexual ambiguity.

The Invention of Martial Arts

Author: Paul Bowman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019754035X

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 5952


Through popular movies starring Bruce Lee and songs like the disco hit "Kung Fu Fighting," martial arts have found a central place in the Western cultural imagination. But what would 'martial arts' be without the explosion of media texts and images that brought it to a wide audience in the late 1960s and early 1970s? In this examination of the media history of what we now call martial arts, author Paul Bowman makes the bold case that the phenomenon of martial arts is chiefly an invention of media representations. Rather than passively taking up a preexisting history of martial arts practices--some of which, of course, predated the martial arts boom in popular culture--media images and narratives actively constructed martial arts. Grounded in a historical survey of the British media history of martial arts such as Bartitsu, jujutsu, judo, karate, tai chi, and MMA across a range of media, this book thoroughly recasts our understanding of the history of martial arts. By interweaving theories of key thinkers on historiography, such as Foucault and Hobsbawm, and Said's ideas on Orientalism with analyses of both mainstream and marginal media texts, Bowman arrives at the surprising insight that media representations created martial arts rather than the other way around. In this way, he not only deepens our understanding of martial arts but also demonstrates the productive power of media discourses.