The Journalist and the Murderer

Author: Janet Malcolm

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780679731832

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 163

View: 5381


Explores the relationship between journalists and their subjects, and the question of journalistic ethics, using the lawsuit of convicted murderer Jeffrey MacDonald against author Joe McGinniss, as a case study

The Journalist and the Murderer

Author: Janet Malcolm

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307797872

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 177

View: 4302


A seminal work and examination of the psychopathology of journalism. Using a strange and unprecedented lawsuit by a convicted murder againt the journalist who wrote a book about his crime, Malcolm delves into the always uneasy, sometimes tragic relationship that exists between journalist and subject. Featuring the real-life lawsuit of Jeffrey MacDonald, a convicted murderer, against Joe McGinniss, the author of Fatal Vision. In Malcolm's view, neither journalist nor subject can avoid the moral impasse that is built into the journalistic situation. When the text first appeared, as a two-part article in The New Yorker, its thesis seemed so radical and its irony so pitiless that journalists across the country reacted as if stung. Her book is a work of journalism as well as an essay on journalism: it at once exemplifies and dissects its subject. In her interviews with the leading and subsidiary characters in the MacDonald-McGinniss case -- the principals, their lawyers, the members of the jury, and the various persons who testified as expert witnesses at the trial -- Malcolm is always aware of herself as a player in a game that, as she points out, she cannot lose. The journalist-subject encounter has always troubled journalists, but never before has it been looked at so unflinchingly and so ruefully. Hovering over the narrative -- and always on the edge of the reader's consciousness -- is the MacDonald murder case itself, which imparts to the book an atmosphere of anxiety and uncanniness. The Journalist and the Murderer derives from and reflects many of the dominant intellectual concerns of our time, and it will have a particular appeal for those who cherish the odd, the off-center, and the unsolved.

The Politics and Poetics of Journalistic Narrative

Author: Phyllis Frus

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521443245

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 292

View: 4322


Frus also takes up the problem of how we determine both the truth of historical events such as the Holocaust and the fictional or factual status of narratives about them.

The Rise of True Crime: 20th-Century Murder and American Popular Culture

Author: Jean Murley

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1573567728

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 4534


During the 1950s and 1960s True Detective magazine developed a new way of narrating and understanding murder. It was more sensitive to context, gave more psychologically sophisticated accounts, and was more willing to make conjectures about the unknown thoughts and motivations of killers than others had been before. This turned out to be the start of a revolution, and, after a century of escalating accounts, we have now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. The Rise of True Crime examines the various genres of true crime using the most popular and well-known examples. And despite its examination of some of the potentially negative effects of the genre, it is written for people who read and enjoy true crime, and wish to learn more about it. With skyrocketing crime rates and the appearance of a frightening trend toward social chaos in the 1970s, books, documentaries, and fiction films in the true crime genre tried to make sense of the Charles Manson crimes and the Gary Gilmore execution events. And in the 1980s and 1990s, true crime taught pop culture consumers about forensics, profiling, and highly technical aspects of criminology. We have thus now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. Through the suggestion that certain kinds of killers are monstrous or outside the realm of human morality, and through the perpetuation of the stranger-danger idea, the true crime aesthetic has both responded to and fostered our culture's fears. True crime is also the site of a dramatic confrontation with the concept of evil, and one of the few places in American public discourse where moral terms are used without any irony, and notions and definitions of evil are presented without ambiguity. When seen within its historical context, true crime emerges as a vibrant and meaningful strand of popular culture, one that is unfortunately devalued as lurid and meaningless pulp.

The Undeclared War between Journalism and Fiction

Author: D. Underwood

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137353481

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 250

View: 7472


In this volume, Doug Underwood asks whether much of what is now called literary journalism is, in fact, 'literary,' and whether it should rank with the great novels by such journalist-literary figures as Twain, Cather, and Hemingway, who believed that fiction was the better place for a realistic writer to express the important truths of life.

Journalism and Truth

Author: Tom Goldstein

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810124335

Category: History

Page: 207

View: 8624


Looking at how journalism has changed over time, this book explores how the long-standing and untrustworthy conventions developed. It examines why reliable standards of objectivity and accuracy are critical not just to a free press but to the democratic society it informs and serves. It offers an account of how journalism and truth work.

Mindful Journalism and News Ethics in the Digital Era

Author: Shelton A. Gunaratne,Mark Pearson,Sugath Senarath

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317527682

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 6273


This book aims to be the first comprehensive exposition of "mindful journalism"—drawn from core Buddhist ethical principles—as a fresh approach to journalism ethics. It suggests that Buddhist mindfulness strategies can be applied purposively in journalism to add clarity, fairness and equity to news decision-making and to offer a moral compass to journalists facing ethical dilemmas in their work. It comes at a time when ethical values in the news media are in crisis from a range of technological, commercial and social factors, and when both Buddhism and mindfulness have gained considerable acceptance in Western societies. Further, it aims to set out foundational principles to assist journalists dealing with vulnerable sources and recovering from traumatic assignments.

The Journalist's Handbook

Author: Kim Fletcher

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1509822348

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 3851


This comprehensive, informative and witty guide offers expert advice on everything you need to know about the industry. From starting up, through pitching your first story, to getting a scoop and avoiding libel, this book offers all the useful hints, advice and contacts you require to be the best. The Journalist's Handbook contains vital information on media law, privacy and ethics, and looks at market awareness and the rise of internet journalism. There is also good advice on different writing techniques for quality, middle market and popular papers, on surviving as a freelance and advancing in your career. Interspersed with anecdotes and tips from journalists on Britain's leading publications (Observer, Express, Star, The Times, Q, Glamour), the handbook is rounded off with a list of indispensable contacts and sources.

Janet Malcolm: The Last Interview

Author: MELVILLE HOUSE

Publisher: Melville House

ISBN: 1612199690

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 192

View: 2170


A provocative collection of interviews with the sublimely talented author of The Journalist and the Murderer The legendary journalist, Janet Malcolm, opened her most famous work The Journalist and the Murderer with the line: “Every journalist who is not too stupid or too full of himself to notice what is going on knows that what he does is morally indefensible.” Ever since its publication in 1980, she only increased her reputation as a devastatingly sharp writer, whose eye for observation is matched only by her formal inventiveness and philosophical interrogations of the relationship between journalist and subject. Predictably, as an interview subject herself, she was an intimidating mark. In this collection, interviewers tangle with their own projections and identifications, while she often, gamely, plays along. Full of insights about her writing process, the craft of journalism, and her own analysis of her most famous works, this collection proves that Janet Malcolm is just as elusive and enlightening in conversation as she was on paper.