The Last London

Author: Iain Sinclair

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1786071754

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 9194


A New Statesman Book of the Year London. A city apart. Inimitable. Or so it once seemed. Spiralling from the outer limits of the Overground to the pinnacle of the Shard, Iain Sinclair encounters a metropolis stretched beyond recognition. The vestiges of secret tunnels, the ghosts of saints and lost poets lie buried by developments, the cycling revolution and Brexit. An electrifying final odyssey, The Last London is an unforgettable vision of the Big Smoke before it disappears into the air of memory.

The London Gazette

Author: Great Britain

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Gazettes

Page: N.A

View: 1593


London's Railways 1967-1977

Author: Jim Blake

Publisher: Wharncliffe

ISBN: 1473833841

Category: Transportation

Page: 176

View: 999


This pictorial book covers London's railways from 1967 to 1977, showing the transition from steam to diesel and electric traction. This volume has a very readable narrative, telling tales of the authors adventures during his many trips around the London railway network. The volume encapsulates a period of time in Britain, during which a great deal of change was taking place, not only with railways and transport, but also socially and economically. Jim Blake, describes all of these changes, while also looking at the capitals transport scene of the period.

Time Out London 22nd edition

Author: Time Out Guides Ltd

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473514010

Category: Travel

Page: 666

View: 6634


Which? Recommended Provider: Time Out Guides is rated top guidebook brand by Which? Survey, for level of detail, photography, quality of maps, ease of finding information and value for money. London, city of Beefeaters, red buses and Buckingham Palace is also a restless innovator: it is home to new projects and stellar architecture (the newly opened Serpentine Sackler Gallery by Zaha Hadid and a grand new Design Museum), year after year of new luxe hotels, boutiques and restaurants, now even whole new neighbourhoods – the Olympic Park in the east, the revitalised Victoriana of King’s Cross to the north. The Time Out London City Guide continues to chart the ups and downs of a city both ancient and cutting edge. With the help of local journalists and experts, the Time Out London Guide takes you beyond the superficial – into the places where locals play, sampling the full extent of its museums and galleries, the best of its eating, shopping and carousing, the most interesting sights, strolls and excursions. The London city guide highlights: Full colour and illustrated throughout with exclusive photography, using original imagery to give a real sense of the place Handy pull-out London map Extensive area guides not only cover the sightseeing in London, but also restaurants, bars and shops – all plotted on maps handily located within the chapter Top 20 list of the must-see highlights Itineraries to help you plan your visit Critic’s choices pick out the best London sights, experiences and cultural highlights – at a glance London restaurants, pubs and bars have been visited and reviewed anonymously by critics who pay their own way London hotels independently reviewed The revamped Time Out Guides retain the independence and local expertise that the series is known for, while adding more features to help the visitor navigate the city. Whether you have an action-packed 24 hours or a leisurely week in which to take it all in, these guides are more essential than ever.

The Battle of Britain, 1945-1965

Author: Garry Campion

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137316268

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 983


Seventy-five years after the Battle of Britain, the Few's role in preventing invasion continues to enjoy a revered place in popular memory. The Air Ministry were central to the Battle's valorisation. This book explores both this, and also the now forgotten 1940 Battle of the Barges mounted by RAF bombers.

A Dark History of Tea

Author: Seren Charrington Hollins

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 1526761637

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 9548


A Dark History of Tea looks at our long relationship with this most revered of hot beverages. Renowned food historian Seren Charrington-Hollins digs into the history of one of the world’s oldest beverages, tracing tea's significance on the tables of the high and mighty as well as providing relief for workers who had to contend with the ardours of manual labour. This humble herbal infusion has been used in burial rituals, as a dowry payment for aristocrats; it has fuelled wars and spelled fortunes as it built empires and sipped itself into being an integral part of the cultural fabric of British life. This book delves into the less tasteful history of a drink now considered quintessentially British. It tells the story of how, carried on the backs of the cruelty of slavery and illicit opium smuggling, it flowed into the cups of British society as an enchanting beverage. Chart the exportation of spices, silks and other goods like opium in exchange for tea, and explain how the array of good fortunes – a huge demand in Britain, a marriage with sugar, naval trade and the existence of the huge trading firms – all spurred the first impulses of modern capitalism and floated countries. The story of tea takes the reader on a fascinating journey from myth, fable and folklore to murky stories of swindling, adulteration, greed, waging of wars, boosting of trade in hard drugs and slavery and the great, albeit dark engines that drove the globalisation of the world economy. All of this is spattered with interesting facts about tea etiquette, tradition and illicit liaisons making it an enjoyable rollercoaster of dark discoveries that will cast away any thoughts of tea as something that merely accompanies breaks, sit downs and biscuits.