Passport to Peking

Author: Patrick Wright

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199541930

Category: Art

Page: 591

View: 2319


In he second half of 1954, scores of European delegations set off for Beijing, in response to Prime Minister Chou En-lai's invitation to 'come and see' the New China and celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Communist victory. In this delightfully eclectic book, part comedy, part travelogue, and part cultural history, Patrick Wright uncovers the story of the four British delegations that made this journey, which included many of the leading political, academic,artistic, and cultural figures of the day.

The Return of Nature

Author: John Bellamy Foster

Publisher: Monthly Review Press

ISBN: 1583679286

Category: Political Science

Page: 672

View: 1520


Winner, 2020 Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize A fascinating reinterpretation of the radical and socialist origins of ecology Twenty years ago, John Bellamy Foster’s Marx’s Ecology: Materialism and Nature introduced a new understanding of Karl Marx’s revolutionary ecological materialism. More than simply a study of Marx, it commenced an intellectual and social history, encompassing thinkers from Epicurus to Darwin, who developed materialist and ecological ideas. Now, with The Return of Nature: Socialism and Ecology, Foster continues this narrative. In so doing, he uncovers a long history of efforts to unite issues of social justice and environmental sustainability that will help us comprehend and counter today’s unprecedented planetary emergencies. The Return of Nature begins with the deaths of Darwin (1882) and Marx (1883) and moves on until the rise of the ecological age in the 1960s and 1970s. Foster explores how socialist analysts and materialist scientists of various stamps, first in Britain, then the United States, from William Morris and Frederick Engels to Joseph Needham, Rachel Carson, and Stephen J. Gould, sought to develop a dialectical naturalism, rooted in a critique of capitalism. In the process, he delivers a far-reaching and fascinating reinterpretation of the radical and socialist origins of ecology. Ultimately, what this book asks for is nothing short of revolution: a long, ecological revolution, aimed at making peace with the planet while meeting collective human needs.

The Meaning of Everything

Author: Simon Winchester,Simon Winchester Obe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198814399

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 4672


"The greatest enterprise of its kind in history," was the verdict of British prime minister Stanley Baldwin in June 1928 when The Oxford English Dictionary was finally published. With its 15,490 pages and nearly two million quotations, it was indeed a monumental achievement, gleaned from the efforts of hundreds of ordinary and extraordinary people who made it their mission to catalogue the English language in its entirety. In The Meaning of Everything, Simon Winchester celebrates this remarkable feat, and the fascinating characters who played such a vital part in its execution, from the colourful Frederick Furnivall, cheerful promoter of an all-female sculling crew, to James Murray, self-educated son of a draper, who spent half a century guiding the project towards fruition. Along the way we learn which dictionary editor became the inspiration for Kenneth Grahame's Ratty in The Wind in the Willows, and why Tolkien found it so hard to define "walrus." Written by the bestselling author of The Surgeon of Crowthorne and The Map That Changed the World, The Meaning of Everything is an enthralling account of the creation of the world's greatest dictionary.

The Meaning of Everything

Author: Simon Winchester OBE

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019254568X

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 4076


'The greatest enterprise of its kind in history,' was the verdict of British prime minister Stanley Baldwin in June 1928 when The Oxford English Dictionary was finally published. With its 15,490 pages and nearly two million quotations, it was indeed a monumental achievement, gleaned from the efforts of hundreds of ordinary and extraordinary people who made it their mission to catalogue the English language in its entirety. In The Meaning of Everything, Simon Winchester celebrates this remarkable feat, and the fascinating characters who played such a vital part in its execution, from the colourful Frederick Furnivall, cheerful promoter of an all-female sculling crew, to James Murray, self-educated son of a draper, who spent half a century guiding the project towards fruition. Along the way we learn which dictionary editor became the inspiration for Kenneth Grahame's Ratty in The Wind in the Willows, and why Tolkien found it so hard to define 'walrus'. Written by the bestselling author of The Surgeon of Crowthorne and The Map That Changed the World, The Meaning of Everything is an enthralling account of the creation of the world's greatest dictionary.

The United States Army in China, 1900äóñ1938

Author: Alfred Emile Cornebise

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476619050

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 2071


A study of U.S.–Chinese relations involving the U.S. Army, this work focuses at the personnel level on the Army’s service in China. While studies have been published of the U.S. Marines’ and U.S. Navy’s involvement in China, little attention has been given the Army’s missions in this theater. Operations in China were a key part of the history and traditions of the 9th, 14th, 15th and 31st Regiments, whose coats of arms still feature dragons as symbols of their service there. Many who served in the 15th in China went on to impressive careers as general officers, prompting one soldier to ask “what other infantry regiment of those days can boast of such an alumni list?” Also covered is the 31st Regiments’ involvement in Shanghai during the Second Sino-Japanese War, the prelude of the coming of World War II in Asia.

This is China

Author: Haiwang Yuan

Publisher: Berkshire Publishing

ISBN: 1933782765

Category: History

Page: 134

View: 6025


This Is China contains, in brief, everything we need to know about 5,000 years of history, 30 years of "opening," and a future that promises to shape the 21st century for all of us. Drawn from the vast resources of the Berkshire Encyclopedia of China, this concise 120-page book is recommended for classroom use, curriculum development, and student review.

Historical Dictionary of Chinese Intelligence

Author: I. C. Smith,Nigel West

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1538130203

Category: Political Science

Page: 522

View: 5883


The second edition of Historical Dictionary of Chinese Intelligence covers the history of Chinese Intelligence from 400 B.C. to modern times. The dictionary section has over 400 cross-referenced entries on the agencies and agents, the operations and equipment, the tradecraft and jargon, and many of the countries involved.

Read On-- Biography

Author: Rick Roche

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1598847015

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 163

View: 486


Categorizing hundreds of popular biographies according to their primary appeal—character, story, setting, language, and mood—and organizing them into thematic lists, this guide will help readers' advisors more effectively recommend titles. * A chronology of the history of the biography genre * Brief reviews of over 450 high interest biographies

The Shanghai Stars and Stripes

Author: Alfred Emile Cornebise

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786455756

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 208

View: 6704


This work is an account of the China edition of the U.S. Army's daily newspaper, The Stars and Stripes, which was geared toward service personnel in the China Theater of Operations at the end of World War II and published for nearly a year. The book addresses Japanese repatriations, war-crime trials, the Chinese civil war and the rise of Communism as covered by the paper, and the paper's role in strengthening U.S. troop morale.

Listening to China

Author: Thomas Irvine

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022666726X

Category: Music

Page: 256

View: 2617


From bell ringing to fireworks, gongs to cannon salutes, a dazzling variety of sounds and soundscapes marked the China encountered by the West around 1800. These sounds were gathered by diplomats, trade officials, missionaries, and other travelers and transmitted back to Europe, where they were reconstructed in the imaginations of writers, philosophers, and music historians such as Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Nikolaus Forkel, and Charles Burney. Thomas Irvine gathers these stories in Listening to China, exploring how the sonic encounter with China shaped perceptions of Europe’s own musical development. Through these stories, Irvine not only investigates how the Sino-Western encounter sounded, but also traces the West’s shifting response to China. As the trading relationships between China and the West broke down, travelers and music theorists abandoned the vision of shared musical approaches, focusing instead on China’s noisiness and sonic disorder and finding less to like in its music. At the same time, Irvine reconsiders the idea of a specifically Western music history, revealing that it was comparison with China, the great “other,” that helped this idea emerge. Ultimately, Irvine draws attention to the ways Western ears were implicated in the colonial and imperial project in China, as well as to China’s importance to the construction of musical knowledge during and after the European Enlightenment. Timely and original, Listening to China is a must-read for music scholars and historians of China alike.