The Path to Power

Author: Robert A. Caro

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307422577

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 960

View: 7872


The Years of Lyndon Johnson is the political biography of our time. No president—no era of American politics—has been so intensively and sharply examined at a time when so many prime witnesses to hitherto untold or misinterpreted facets of a life, a career, and a period of history could still be persuaded to speak. The Path to Power, Book One, reveals in extraordinary detail the genesis of the almost superhuman drive, energy, and urge to power that set LBJ apart. Chronicling the startling early emergence of Johnson’s political genius, it follows him from his Texas boyhood through the years of the Depression in the Texas hill Country to the triumph of his congressional debut in New Deal Washington, to his heartbreaking defeat in his first race for the Senate, and his attainment, nonetheless, of the national power for which he hungered. We see in him, from earliest childhood, a fierce, unquenchable necessity to be first, to win, to dominate—coupled with a limitless capacity for hard, unceasing labor in the service of his own ambition. Caro shows us the big, gangling, awkward young Lyndon—raised in one of the country’s most desperately poor and isolated areas, his education mediocre at best, his pride stung by his father’s slide into failure and financial ruin—lunging for success, moving inexorably toward that ultimate “impossible” goal that he sets for himself years before any friend or enemy suspects what it may be. We watch him, while still at college, instinctively (and ruthlessly) creating the beginnings of the political machine that was to serve him for three decades. We see him employing his extraordinary ability to mesmerize and manipulate powerful older men, to mesmerize (and sometimes almost enslave) useful subordinates. We see him carrying out, before his thirtieth year, his first great political inspiration: tapping-and becoming the political conduit for-the money and influence of the new oil men and contractors who were to grow with him to immense power. We follow, close up, the radical fluctuations of his relationships with the formidable “Mr. Sam” Raybum (who loved him like a son and whom he betrayed) and with FDR himself. And we follow the dramas of his emotional life-the intensities and complications of his relationships with his family, his contemporaries, his girls; his wooing and winning of the shy Lady Bird; his secret love affair, over many years, with the mistress of one of his most ardent and generous supporters . . . Johnson driving his people to the point of exhausted tears, equally merciless with himself . . . Johnson bullying, cajoling, lying, yet inspiring an amazing loyalty . . . Johnson maneuvering to dethrone the unassailable old Jack Garner (then Vice President of the United States) as the New Deal’s “connection” in Texas, and seize the power himself . . . Johnson raging . . . Johnson hugging . . . Johnson bringing light and, indeed, life to the worn Hill Country farmers and their old-at-thirty wives via the district’s first electric lines. We see him at once unscrupulous, admirable, treacherous, devoted. And we see the country that bred him: the harshness and “nauseating loneliness” of the rural life; the tragic panorama of the Depression; the sudden glow of hope at the dawn of the Age of Roosevelt. And always, in the foreground, on the move, LBJ. Here is Lyndon Johnson—his Texas, his Washington, his America—in a book that brings us as close as we have ever been to a true perception of political genius and the American political process.

The Years of Lyndon Johnson: Means of ascent

Author: Robert A. Caro

Publisher: Alfred a Knopf Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 560

View: 8203


Robert A. Caro's life of Lyndon Johnson, which began with the greatly acclaimed The Path to Power, also winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, continues -- one of the richest, most intensive and most revealing examinations ever undertaken of an American President. In Means of Ascent the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer/historian, chronicler also of Robert Moses in The Power Broker, carries Johnson through his service in World War II and the foundation of his long-concealed fortune and the facts behind the myths he created about it. But the explosive heart of the book is Caro's revelation of the true story of the fiercely contested 1948 senatorial election, for forty years shrouded in rumor, which Johnson had to win or face certain political death, and which he did win -- by "the 87 votes that changed history." Caro makes us witness to a momentous turning point in American politics: the tragic last stand of the old politics versus the new -- the politics of issue versus the politics of image, mass manipulation, money and electronic dazzle. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Sun Bear: The Path of Power

Author: Sunbear

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 145167239X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 683


From a childhood spent in the forest of the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota, Sun Bear went on to become one of the most groundbreaking and inspiring spiritual teachers of the late 20th century. Far ahead of his time, he founded an inter-racial medicine society of teachers dedicated to sharing with others those lessons of earth harmony which they had learned through their own experience. His vision of the medicine wheel became a worldwide phenomenon that inspired many people to learn more about the earth and all their relations upon her. Almost two decades after his death, Sun Bear's lessons are even more necessary today than ever. —MarliseWabunWind.com

The Path to Athletic Power

Author: Boyd Epley

Publisher: Human Kinetics

ISBN: 9780736047012

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 319

View: 5846


This text chronicles the development of modern sports conditioning practices through the eyes and first-hand experiences of leading expert, Boyd Epley.

Plutocrats, Preachers, and Pawns: The Path to Political Power in America

Author: Janet G. Miller

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 130430440X

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 6726


The central question in American democracy today is how the plutocratic 1% minority received enough votes from the 99% majority to gain control of government at all levels. This political novel tells a story that reveals how wealthy plutocrats have gained majority political power by buying the messaging of preachers in independent churches that included presenting sermons that deceive white Protestant Christians and influence their votes. After moving into a mid-western region of America and living there for many years, the author learned that independent churches dominated “Christianity” in that region. Having attended some of the major “big box” church events by invitation, as well as having lived among these political evangelicals, the author experienced first-hand the power of these independent churches in drawing people into membership for a multitude of reasons that included influencing their political voting and had little or nothing to do with Christianity.

The Path to Personal Power

Author: Napoleon Hill

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101992840

Category: Self-Help

Page: 256

View: 5466


This true lost manuscript from the "grandfather of self-help," Napoleon Hill provides timeless wisdom on how to attain a more successful and wealthy life using simple principles. Napoleon Hill first wrote The Path to Personal Power in 1941, intending it as a handbook for people lifting themselves out of the Great Depression. But upon the bombing of Pearl Harbor and America's entrance into World War II, these lessons were put aside and largely forgotten--until today. Discovered in the archives of the Napoleon Hill Foundation, this never-before-published work is made up of three easily digested lessons, each its own chapter: Definteness of Purpose; the Master Mind; and Going the Extra Mile. This concise book is a powerful roadmap that leads to a single discovery--you already have the power to attain whatever wealth, success, and prosperity you desire in life. All you need to do is walk the path without straying, and the rest will follow. Using these lessons, you have principles to live by that will help you stay on your own personal path to power, and achieve success that you never thought possible.

The Path to Tyranny

Author: Michael Newton

Publisher: Michael Newton

ISBN: 0982604017

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 7951


Examines how many free societies have fallen to tyranny and looks at the possibility that the United States could be next.

Shame and Humiliation

Author: Blema S. Steinberg

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773565906

Category: Political Science

Page: 408

View: 9247


Steinberg focuses on the narcissistic personality, identifying it as intensely self-involved and preoccupied with success and recognition as a substitute for parental love. She asserts that narcissistic leaders are most likely to use force when they fear being humiliated for failing to act and when they need to restore their diminished sense of self-worth. Providing case studies of Johnson, Nixon, and Eisenhower, Steinberg describes the childhood, maturation, and career of each president, documenting key personality attributes, and then discusses each one's Vietnam policy in light of these traits. She contends that Johnson authorized the bombing of Vietnam in part because he feared the humiliation that would come from inaction, and that Nixon escalated U.S. intervention in Cambodia in part because of his low sense of self-esteem. Steinberg contrasts these two presidents with Eisenhower, who was psychologically secure and was, therefore, able to carry out a careful and thoughtful analysis of the problem he faced in Indochina. Shame and Humiliation reveals how personality traits affect our perception of reality and offers a powerful demonstration of the impact of psychodynamics on presidential decision making.

The Path to Salvation

Author: Heather Selma Gregg

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 161234660X

Category: Religion

Page: 216

View: 1372


In the wake of 9/11, policy analysts, journalists, and academics have tried to make sense of the rise of militant Islam, particularly its role as a motivating and legitimating force for violence against the United States. The general perception is that Islam is more violence-prone than other religions and that scripture and beliefs within the faith, such as the doctrines of jihad and martyrdom, demonstrate the inherently violent nature of Islam. Here, however, Heather Selma Gregg draws comparisons across religious traditions to investigate common causes of religious violence. The author sets side-by-side examples of current and historic Islamic violence with similar acts by Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, and Hindu adherents. Based on her findings, Gregg challenges the assumption that religious violence stems from a faithÆs scriptures. Instead, Gregg argues that religious violence is the result of interpretations of a religionÆs beliefs and scriptures. Interpretations calling for violence in the name of a faith are the product of individuals, but it is important to understand the conditions under which these violent interpretations of a religion occur. These conditions must be considered by identifying who is interpreting the religion and by what authority; the social, political, and economic circumstances surrounding these violent interpretations; and the believability of these interpretations by members of religious communities.

Women, Educational Policy-Making and Administration in England

Author: Joyce Goodman,Sylvia Harrop

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134639708

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 2112


The role of women in policy-making has been largely neglected in conventional social and political histories. This book opens up this field of study, taking the example of women in education as its focus. It examines the work, attitudes, actions and philosophies of women who played a part in policy-making and administration in education in England over two centuries, looking at women engaged at every level from the local school to the state. Women, Educational Policy-Making and Administration in England traces women's involvement in the establishment and management of schools and teacher training; the foundation of the school boards; women's representation on educational commissions, and their rising professional profile in such roles as school inspector or minister of education. These activities highlight vital questions of gender, class, power and authority, and illuminate the increasingly diverse and prominent spectrum of political activity in which women have participated. Offering a new perspective on the professional and political role of women, this book represents essential reading for anybody with an interest in gender studies or the social and political history of England in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.