The Pillow Book

Author: Shannon Okey

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 9780811860857

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 144

View: 8485


Demonstrates how to transform a room with fresh, colorful cushions and pillows, in a creative guidebook that features more than twenty-five patterns for stylish pillows for every room in the house, from easy-to-make throw pillows, shams, and bolsters, to more intricate bench pads, ottomans, and oversized floor cushions. 12,900 first printing.

Unbinding The Pillow Book

Author: Gergana Ivanova

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231547609

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 226

View: 909


An eleventh-century classic, The Pillow Book of Sei Shōnagon is frequently paired with The Tale of Genji as one of the most important works in the Japanese canon. Yet it has also been marginalized within Japanese literature for reasons including the gender of its author, the work’s complex textual history, and its thematic and stylistic depth. In Unbinding The Pillow Book, Gergana Ivanova offers a reception history of The Pillow Book and its author from the seventeenth century to the present that shows how various ideologies have influenced the text and shaped interactions among its different versions. Ivanova examines how and why The Pillow Book has been read over the centuries, placing it in the multiple contexts in which it has been rewritten, including women’s education, literary scholarship, popular culture, “pleasure quarters,” and the formation of the modern nation-state. Drawing on scholarly commentaries, erotic parodies, instruction manuals for women, high school textbooks, and comic books, she considers its outsized role in ideas about Japanese women writers. Ultimately, Ivanova argues for engaging the work’s plurality in order to achieve a clearer understanding of The Pillow Book and the importance it has held for generations of readers, rather than limiting it to a definitive version or singular meaning. The first book-length study in English of the reception history of Sei Shōnagon, Unbinding The Pillow Book sheds new light on the construction of gender and sexuality, how women’s writing has been used to create readerships, and why ancient texts continue to play vibrant roles in contemporary cultural production.

The Pillow Book

Author: Sei Shonagon

Publisher: Courier Dover Publications

ISBN: 0486834433

Category: History

Page: 80

View: 2365


In the tenth century, Japan was both physically and culturally isolated from the rest of the world. The Pillow Book recaptures this lost world with the diary of a young court lady. Sei Shōnagon was a contemporary of Murasaki Shikibu, who wrote the well-known novel The Tale of Genji. Unlike the latter's fictionalized view of the Heian-era court, Shōnagon's journal provides a lively miscellany of anecdotes, observations, and gossip, intended to be read in juicy bits and pieces. This unique volume was first rendered into English in 1889. In 1928, Arthur Waley, a seminal figure in the Western studies of Japanese culture, undertook a translation. The distinguished scholar devised this abridged version of the text, re-creating in English the stylistic beauty of its prose and the vitality of its narrative. Waley's interpretation offers a fascinating glimpse of the artistic pursuits of the royal court and its constant round of rituals, festivals, and ceremonies.

The Pillow Book of Sei Shōnagon

Author: N.A

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231549237

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 303

View: 7715


The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is a fascinating, detailed account of Japanese court life in the eleventh century. Written by a lady of the court at the height of Heian culture, this book enthralls with its lively gossip, witty observations, and subtle impressions. Lady Shonagon was an erstwhile rival of Lady Murasaki, whose novel, The Tale of Genji, fictionalized the elite world Lady Shonagon so eloquently relates. Featuring reflections on royal and religious ceremonies, nature, conversation, poetry, and many other subjects, The Pillow Book is an intimate look at the experiences and outlook of the Heian upper class, further enriched by Ivan Morris's extensive notes and critical contextualization.

The Pillow Book of the Flower Samurai

Author: Barbara Lazar

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0755389271

Category: Fiction

Page: 465

View: 5729


I am Kozaisho: Fifth daughter, Woman-For-Play, teller of stories, lover, wife and Flower Samurai. In the rich, dazzling, brutal world of twelfth century Japan, one young girl begins her epic journey, from the warmth of family to the Village of Outcasts. Marked out by an auspicious omen, she is trained in the ancient warrior arts of the samurai. But it is through the power of storytelling that she learns to fight her fate, twisting her life onto a path even she could not have imagined...

The Pillow Book of Lady Wisteria

Author: Laura Joh Rowland

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 1429908467

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 7170


In The Pillow Book of Lady Wisteria, Laura Joh Rowland once again has written a book in which "an exotic setting, seventeenth-century Japan, and a splendid mystery...make for grand entertainment" (New York Daily News). In the carefully ordered world of seventeenth-century Japan, the Yoshiwara pleasure quarter is a place where men of all classes can drink, revel, and enjoy the favors of beautiful courtesans. But on a cold winter's dawn, Sano Ichiro--the shogun's Most Honorable Investigator of Events, Situations, and People--must visit Yoshiwara on a most unpleasant mission. Within a house of assignation reserved for the wealthiest, most prominent men, a terrible murder has occurred. In a room that reeks of liquor and sex, the shogun's cousin and heir, Lord Mitsuyoshi, lies dead, a flowered hairpin embedded in his eye, in the bed of the famous courtesan, Lady Wisteria. The shogun demands quick justice, but Sano's path is blocked by many obstacles, including the disappearance of Wisteria and her pillow book, a diary that may contain clues. The politics of court life, the whims of the shogun, and interference by his long time rival, Edo's Chief Police Commissioner Hoshina, also hinder Sano in his search for the killer. Sano's wife, Lady Reiko, is eager to help him, but he fears what she may uncover. When suspicion of murder falls upon Sano himself, he must find the real murderer to solve the case and clear his name.

Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon

Author: N.A

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 1462900887

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 144

View: 639


Japan in the 10th century stood physically and culturally isolated from the rest of the world. Inside this bubble, a subtle and beautiful world was in operation, and its inhabitants were tied to the moment, having no interest in the future and disdain for the past. The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon was a product of a tenth century courtier's experiences in the palace of Empress Teishi. A common custom of the time period, courtiers used to keep notes or a diary in a wooden pillow with a drawer. This "pillow book" reflects the confident aesthetic judgments of Shonagon and her ability to create prose that crossed into the realm of the poetic. The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon is one of the earliest examples of diary literature whose passages chronicle the events of the court calendar, the ceremonies and celebrations specific to Teishi's court, and the vignettes that provide brilliantly drawn glimpses into the manners and foibles of the aristocracy. A contemporary of Murasaki Shikibu, the author of The Tale of Genji, this small diary brings an added dimension to Murasaki's timeless and seminal work. Arthur Waley's elegant translation of The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon captures the beauty of its prose and the vitality of Shonagon's narrative voice, as well as her quirky personality traits. In a place and time where poetry was as important as knowledge and beauty was highly revered, Sei Shonagon's private writings give the reader a charming and intimate glimpse into a time of isolated innocence and pale beauty.

The Pillow Book of Lotus Lowenstein

Author: Libby Schmais

Publisher: Delacorte Press

ISBN: 0375893806

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 256

View: 1530


An adorable, completely original YA voice. Lotus Lowenstein's life is merde. She dreams of moving to Paris and becoming an existentialist. Yet here she is trapped in Park Slope, Brooklyn, with a New-Agey mom, an out-of-work dad, and a chess champion brother who dreams of being a rock star. Merci à Dieu for Lotus’s best friend, Joni, who loves French culture enough to cofound their high school’s first French Club with Lotus. At the first meeting, the cutest boy in the world walks in. His name is Sean, and he too loves French culture and worships Jean-Paul Sartre. At first, Lotus thinks Sean is the best thing to happen to her in years. He’s smart, cultured, and adorable. Unfortunately, though, Joni feels the same way. And having an existentialist view of love, Sean sees nothing wrong with enjoying both girls’ affections. Things come to a head when all three depart for Montreal with their teacher, Ms. G, on the French Club’s first official field trip. Will Sean choose Joni over Lotus? And will Lotus and Joni’s friendship ever recover?

The Pillow Book of Dr Jazz

Author: Trevor Carolan

Publisher: Ekstasis Editions

ISBN: 9781894800792

Category: Asia

Page: 255

View: 8683


The Pillowbook of Doctor Jazz is autobiographical fiction in the tradition of Jack Kerouac: on the road in the Golden Triangle of Southeast Asia. Recalling the Japanese Pillowbook of Sei Shonogan, Dr. Jazz records the sights and sounds of his journeys, in the ironic voice of a traveller at end of day.

The Pillow Book of Carmen Garcia

Author: Alfonso Borello

Publisher: Villaggio Publishing Ltd.

ISBN: 130171240X

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 5822


HOW DETRIMENTAL IS living in fear, segregated, trodden, almost discarded by society? I shouldn't use such terrible words; well, guess what? I've learned to live with it for the past year, more or less; I'm no longer keeping track of time. I could blame the ones who degraded me, with or without intentions, but sadly, and with tremendous courage, I can only blame myself. I can only blame the terrible choices I've made, and day after day I can only find the strength to survive, to live with hope, to get better, so that I can preserve my dignity. This journal was not intended for any purpose, probably it shouldn't even be read; it was only meant to be written. It's a disturbing chronicle; a life that is slowly slipping away, deteriorating—perhaps. It's about self-respect. Hopefully I shall not bore you with any cathartic effect, because it would not be my intention.