Before the Voice of Reason

Author: David Michael Kleinberg-Levin

Publisher: State University of New York Press

ISBN: 0791477827

Category: Philosophy

Page: 309

View: 4864


Provides a critique of reason, demanding that we take greater responsibility for nature and other people.

The Voice of Reason

Author: Ayn Rand

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101137266

Category: Philosophy

Page: 368

View: 8612


Between 1961, when she gave her first talk at the Ford Hall Forum in Boston, and 1981, when she gave the last talk of her life in New Orleans, Ayn Rand spoke and wrote about topics as varied as education, medicine, Vietnam, and the death of Marilyn Monroe. In The Voice of Reason, these pieces, written in the last decades of Rand's life, are gathered in book form for the first time. With them are five essays by Leonard Peikoff, Rand's longtime associate and literary executor. The work concludes with Peikoff's epilogue, "My Thirty Years With Ayn Rand: An Intellectual Memoir," which answers the question "What was Ayn Rand really like?" Important reading for all thinking individuals, Rand's later writings reflect a life lived on principle, a probing mind, and a passionate intensity. This collection communicates not only Rand's singular worldview, but also the penetrating cultural and political analysis to which it gives rise.

The Voice of Conscience

Author: Mika Ojakangas

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1623567203

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 6114


In Western thought, it has been persistently assumed that in moral and political matters, people should rely on the inner voice of conscience rather than on external authorities, laws, and regulations. This volume investigates this concept, examining the development of the Western politics of conscience, from Socrates to the present, and the formation of the Western ethico-political subject. The work opens with a discussion of the ambiguous role of conscience in politics, contesting the claim that it is the best defense against totalitarianism. It then look back at canonical authors, from the Church Fathers and Luther to Rousseau and Derrida, to show how the experience of conscience constitutes the foundation of Western ethics and politics. This unique work not only synthesizes philosophical and political insights, but also pays attention to political theology to provide a compelling and innovative argument that the experience of conscience has always been at the core of the political Western tradition. An engaging and accessible text, it will appeal to political theorists and philosophers as well as theologians and those interested in the critique of the Western civilization.

Hermeneutics and the Voice of the Other

Author: James Risser

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791432570

Category: Philosophy

Page: 306

View: 7981


Elucidates the major components of Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics found in his later work.

The Voice of the People

Author: Matthew Campbell,Michael Perraudin

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 1783080612

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 232

View: 6274


‘The Voice of the People’ presents a series of essays on literary aspects of the European folk revival of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and focuses on two key practices of antiquarianism: the role that collecting and editing played in the formation of ethnological study in the European academy; and the business of publishing and editing, which produced many ‘folkloric’ texts of dubious authenticity. The volume also presents new readings of various genres, including the epic, song, tale and novel, and contributes to the study of several crucial European literary figures. Above all, it investigates the great anonymous authors of the European folk tradition – in narrative and lyric art – and their relation to the cultural movements and imagined identities of the peoples of the emerging nineteenth-century European nation.

The Power of Understanding Yourself

Author: Dave Mitchell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119516331

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 5531


Discover your true self and align your life journey around your core beliefs, values and perspective. Designed as both a companion piece to the author's previous book, The Power of Understanding People, and a stand-alone work, The Power of Understanding Yourself provides readers with a blueprint for examining their true purpose and approach to life and a map for achieving greater personal happiness, professional success and self-awareness. It explores personal attributes related to interactive style, diving deeper into the concepts from the author's previous book, provides exercises for exploring how to connect your current life status to a desired future state and encourages readers to engage in a deep exploration of their core values, beliefs, mission and vision to become their best self. • Find the key to self-discovery and personal development • Uncover your true purpose • Use helpful exercises to reveal the best you • Develop strategies to maximize your potential The Power of Understanding Yourself is an empowering tool to help you find your best possible self and flourish.

Music, Madness, and the Unworking of Language

Author: John T Hamilton

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231512546

Category: Music

Page: 272

View: 1231


In the romantic tradition, music is consistently associated with madness, either as cause or cure. Writers as diverse as Kleist, Hoffmann, and Nietzsche articulated this theme, which in fact reaches back to classical antiquity and continues to resonate in the modern imagination. What John Hamilton investigates in this study is the way literary, philosophical, and psychological treatments of music and madness challenge the limits of representation and thereby create a crisis of language. Special focus is given to the decidedly autobiographical impulse of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, where musical experience and mental disturbance disrupt the expression of referential thought, illuminating the irreducible aspects of the self before language can work them back into a discursive system. The study begins in the 1750s with Diderot's Neveu de Rameau, and situates that text in relation to Rousseau's reflections on the voice and the burgeoning discipline of musical aesthetics. Upon tracing the linkage of music and madness that courses through the work of Herder, Hegel, Wackenroder, and Kleist, Hamilton turns his attention to E. T. A. Hoffmann, whose writings of the first decades of the nineteenth century accumulate and qualify the preceding tradition. Throughout, Hamilton considers the particular representations that link music and madness, investigating the underlying motives, preconceptions, and ideological premises that facilitate the association of these two experiences. The gap between sensation and its verbal representation proved especially problematic for romantic writers concerned with the ineffability of selfhood. The author who chose to represent himself necessarily faced problems of language, which invariably compromised the uniqueness that the author wished to express. Music and madness, therefore, unworked the generalizing functions of language and marked a critical limit to linguistic capabilities. While the various conflicts among music, madness, and language questioned the viability of signification, they also raised the possibility of producing meaning beyond significance.

Derrida and Negative Theology

Author: Professor Harold Coward,Harold G. Coward,Toby Foshay,Jacques Derrida

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791409633

Category: Philosophy

Page: 356

View: 2403


This book explores the thought of Jacques Derrida as it relates to the tradition of apophatic thought--negative theology and philosophy--in both Western and Eastern traditions. Following the Introduction by Toby Foshay, two of Derrida's essays on negative theology, Of an Apocalyptic Tone Newly Adopted in Philosophy and How to Avoid Speaking: Denials, are reprinted here. These are followed by essays from a Western perspective by Mark C. Taylor and Michel Despland, and essays from an Eastern perspective by David Loy, a Buddhist, and Harold Coward, a Hindu. In the Conclusion, Jacques Derrida responds to these discussions.