Tom Crean

Author: Michael Smith

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 1848899130

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 122

View: 4191


Tom Crean ran away from his Kerry home, aged 15, to join the British navy in 1893. He travelled to the Antarctic with the famous explorers, Scott and Shackleton. He explored the unknown, crossed ice fields and wild oceans and courageously saved friends from death.

Travels with Tom Crean

Author: Aidan Dooley

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 1848895941

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 269

View: 6616


TWO MEN Tom Crean, the Kerryman, whose phenomenal feats of bravery in the unexplored Antarctic earned him a rare medal for valour, pinned on him by King George. Aidan Dooley, the Galway man, who rejected a job in the bank for a life on the stage. ONE STORY In this enthralling, funny and moving account, actor Aidan Dooley tells the story of his journey with Tom Crean. His one- man show about this unsung hero grew from an unknown play with an unknown actor into an award-winning hit that has been performed from Dublin to Dubai, and from Broadway to the Antarctic ice. This is a tale of fortitude and courage – on stage and in the savage beauty at the bottom of the world.

Crean - The Extraordinary Life of an Irish Hero

Author: Tim Foley

Publisher: Keel Foley Publishing

ISBN: 1999918940

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 278

View: 9439


Since 2010 Tim Foley has been the driving force of a campaign to honour a man with a remarkable story. Tom Crean, the subject of the new book 'Crean -The Extraordinary Life of an Irish Hero,' was born and raised a few miles away from the author’s father, on the breathtaking Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. Tim’s narrative in this Special edition, standalone biography, is based on many years of research and study into the life of Crean, who joined the Navy at 16-years-old and who embarked upon a career that saw him become a member of three major, pioneering Polar expeditions of the 20th century. Much of the research undertaken for this biography sheds new light on Crean's story and the book challenges commonly held beliefs about the life and naval career of Tom Crean. The story commences in late 19th century Ireland under the governance of the British Empire and continues through Crean’s career in the Royal Navy whilst serving under the leadership of Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton over the course of three Antarctic expeditions, Discovery, 1901-1904, Terra Nova, 1910-1913 and Endurance, 1914-1916. After serving an unhappy apprenticeship under the strict governance of the Navy at the age of 16, Able Seaman, Tom Crean found himself thrust into a major international incident on his first Naval assignment to Central America. It sparked another miserable period of his Naval career and resulted in demotions until an opportunity arose that would lead him to the place where he became most associated with – Antarctica. Crean found his true calling during the heroic age of exploration on the frozen continent. Four of the chapters in the book focus on documented tales of Crean’s remarkable heroism that brought about the life-saving rescue of 25 of his colleagues over three separate occasions. We are then taken through to Crean’s retirement and his return to a changed country in the aftermath of rebellion and in the midst of a War of Independence that came at a great personal loss to Tom Crean. The book goes on to question why and how Crean’s story was largely forgotten during his lifetime and after his death and reveals the surprising source of the first ever documented account of Crean's Polar feats that was written in 1952. Continuing the story the author details the efforts now being made in a petition to earn him national recognition from the Irish Government. Born in 1877, the son of a farmer and into an impoverished life in County Kerry, Ireland, Tom Crean’s tale is one of suffering. successes and sadness but above all, it’s an inspirational story of an unassuming man who displayed unparalleled bravery to save the lives of many others whilst subject to the harshest conditions on the planet. This book version is a Special volume, second edition written to commemorate the centenary of Tom Crean's retirement from the Royal Navy in 1920. It features additional, freshly sourced information, new images and maps, added to assist readers through the journey of Tom Crean's life.

An Unsung Hero

Author: Michael Smith

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN: 1848890532

Category: History

Page: 364

View: 9242


The story of the remarkable Tom Crean who ran away to sea aged 15 and played a memorable role in Antarctic exploration. He spent more time in the unexplored Antarctic than Scott or Shackleton, and outlived both. Among the last to see Scott alive, Crean was in the search party that found the frozen body. An unforgettable story of triumph over unparalleled hardship and deprivation.

The Victoria Cross in 100 Objects

Author: Brian Best

Publisher: Frontline Books

ISBN: 1526730790

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 7127


It was the events of the Crimean War that changed everything. Until that time, those serving in Britain’s army or navy had been expected to do their duty without thought of recognition or reward, particularly the men in the lower ranks. Fueled by reports from the first ever war correspondents, which were read by an increasingly literate public, the mumblings of discontent over how the gallantry and valor of the ordinary man was recognized rapidly grew into a national outcry. Questions were asked in Parliament, answers were demanded by the press – why were the heroes of the Alma, Inkerman and the Charge of the Light Brigade not being officially acknowledged? Something had to be done. That something was the introduction of an award that would be of such prestige it would be sought by all men from the most junior private to a Field Marshal. It would be the highest possible award for valor in the face of the enemy and it bore the name of the Queen for whom the men fought – The Victoria Cross. Since the VC was instituted in January 1856, it has been awarded 1,358 times to 1,355 individual recipients. Those men were thrown into wars and campaigns around the globe, from the seas and skies around the UK to the deserts of Africa and the sweltering jungles of the Far East. The two world wars saw the most VCs awarded – 628 in the First and 182 in the Second. Only fifteen medals, eleven to members of the British Army, and four to the Australian Army, have been awarded since the Second World War. In this highly-illustrated work, the renowned Victoria Cross historian and author Brian Best examines the introduction and evolution of the VC, along with some of the fascinating individuals and remarkable acts of valor associated with it, through an intriguing collection of 100 objects.

Roars from the Back of the Bus

Author: Stewart McKinney

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1780571488

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 8345


Roars from the Back of the Bus is an absorbing, amusing and at times moving collection of tales that give a rare insight into the camaraderie that exists between players at the top of their game, showing that relationships forged through experiences on a Lions tour last a lifetime. From the first Tour in 1888, it showcases characters with immense personality who fought together in wars or on rugby pitches in foreign lands, and who shared a bond developed through touring as representatives of the home nations. Despite the changes to the game after the advent of professionalism, the experiences of Jamie Heaslip, Brian O’Driscoll and Joe Worsley are still similar in some ways to those of earlier intrepid tourists like Blair Mayne, Lewis Jones, Sir Carl Aarvold or David Rollo. Containing defining memories and private insights from across the tours and the decades, Roars from the Back of the Bus shows that the Lions ethos remains strong at the heart of every team.

The Wide White Page

Author: Bill Manhire

Publisher: Victoria University Press

ISBN: 9780864734853

Category: Antarctica

Page: 327

View: 4600


The wide white page spans eight centuries of writing - from Dante's epic account of Ulysses's last southbound ocean journey to Michael Chabon's writing of a WWII US army base on the ice, in Kavalier and Clay. There is fiction and poetry from nearly a dozen different countries, and genres range from Coleridge's Rime of the ancient mariner, via H.P. Lovecraft's Gothic fantasy and Kim Stanley Robinson future fiction, to the surreal comedy of Monty Python's Scott of the Sahara." --book jacket.

Ingenious Ireland

Author: Mary L. Mulvihill

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780684020945

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 1707


Ingenious Ireland takes readers on a magnificent tour of the country's natural wonders, clever inventions, and historic sites. Richly illustrated and meticulously compiled, Ingenious Ireland introduces readers to the complete history, culture, and landscape of all thirty-two Irish counties. Mary Mulvihill unearths Ireland's treasures and divulges her secrets, such as the oldest fossil footprints in the Northern hemisphere, the advent of railways, the invention of milk of magnesia, and why the shamrock is a sham. Fascinating and comprehensive, Ingenious Ireland unravels the mysteries and marvels of this remarkable country.

The Little Book of the Wild Atlantic Way

Author: Helen Lee

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750997621

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 7617


Did you know that the inventor of the submarine was born along the west coast of Ireland, that ships from the Spanish Armada floundered off the Irish Atlantic seaboard and that guns for the 1916 Easter Rising were to be landed at Barna Strand in Co. Kerry but the ship, The Aud, was intercepted by the British Navy? Did you know that there was a plan to smuggle Marie Antoinette from France and away from Madame Guillotine to Dingle, that the Fasnet Rock off the south coast is known as the ‘tear drop of Ireland’ and that Maureen O’Hara’s husband was a flying boat pilot who regularly flew into the flying boat station at Foynes? And did you know that Martello towers were built along the western seaboard during the Napoleonic Wars in case Napoleon tried to invade Great Britain via ‘the back door’? This fact-packed little book is full of all sorts of information that will surprise even those who think they know the towns and villages along the Wild Atlantic Way.