Boom

Author: Russell Miller

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780297871057

Category: Marshals

Page: 402

View: 4003


Hugh 'Boom' Trenchard was embarrassed by being described as 'The Father of the Royal Air Force' - he thought others were more deserving. But the reality was that no man did more to establish the world's first independent air force and ensure its survival in the teeth of fierce opposition from both the Admiralty and the War Office. Born in Taunton in 1873, Trenchard struggled at school, not helped by the shame of his solicitor father's bankruptcy when he was sixteen. He failed entrance examinations to both the Royal Navy and the Army several times, eventually obtaining a commission through the 'back door' of the militia. After service in India, South Africa - where he was seriously wounded - and Nigeria, he found his destiny when he joined the fledgling Royal Flying Corps in 1912, where he was soon known as 'Boom' thanks to his stentorian voice. Quick to recognise the huge potential aircraft offered in future conflicts, he rose rapidly to command the RFC in France during the First World War despite handicaps that would have blighted conventional military careers: he was obstinate, tactless, inarticulate and chronically unable to remember names - yet he was able to inspire unflagging loyalty among all ranks. Despite his conspicuous distrust of politicians, he served as a successful Chief of the Air Staff for a decade after the war and then, at the personal request of the King, took over as Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, which he reorganised and reformed. He never wavered in his belief that mastery of the air could only be achieved by relentless offensive action, or in his determined advocacy of strategic bombing. His most enduring legacy was the creation of the finest air force in the world, engendered with the spirit that won the Battle of Britain.

Trenchard: Father of the Royal Air Force - the Biography

Author: Russell Miller

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0297871072

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 4500


'A magnetic and colourful portrait' Daily Telegraph Hugh 'Boom' Trenchard was embarrassed by being described as 'The Father of the Royal Air Force' - he thought others were more deserving. But the reality was that no man did more to establish the world's first independent air force and ensure its survival in the teeth of fierce opposition from both the Admiralty and the War Office. Born in Taunton in 1873, Trenchard struggled at school, not helped by the shame of his solicitor father's bankruptcy when he was sixteen. He failed entrance examinations to both the Royal Navy and the Army several times, eventually obtaining a commission through the 'back door' of the militia. After service in India, South Africa - where he was seriously wounded - and Nigeria, he found his destiny when he joined the fledgling Royal Flying Corps in 1912, where he was soon known as 'Boom' thanks to his stentorian voice. Quick to recognise the huge potential aircraft offered in future conflicts, he rose rapidly to command the RFC in France during the First World War despite handicaps that would have blighted conventional military careers: he was obstinate, tactless, inarticulate and chronically unable to remember names - yet he was able to inspire unflagging loyalty among all ranks. Despite his conspicuous distrust of politicians, he served as a successful Chief of the Air Staff for a decade after the war and then, at the personal request of the King, took over as Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, which he reorganised and reformed. He never wavered in his belief that mastery of the air could only be achieved by relentless offensive action, or in his determined advocacy of strategic bombing. His most enduring legacy was the creation of the finest air force in the world, engendered with the spirit that won the Battle of Britain.

Trenchard

Author: Russell Miller

Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson

ISBN: 9781780226651

Category:

Page: 416

View: 8106


Hugh 'Boom' Trenchard was embarrassed by being described as 'The Father of the Royal Air Force' - he thought others were more deserving. But the reality was that no man did more to establish the world's first independent air force and ensure its survival in the teeth of fierce opposition from both the Admiralty and the War Office. Born in Taunton in 1873, Trenchard struggled at school, not helped by the shame of his solicitor father's bankruptcy when he was sixteen. He failed entrance examinations to both the Royal Navy and the Army several times, eventually obtaining a commission through the 'back door' of the militia. After service in India, South Africa - where he was seriously wounded - and Nigeria, he found his destiny when he joined the fledgling Royal Flying Corps in 1912, where he was soon known as 'Boom' thanks to his stentorian voice. Quick to recognise the huge potential aircraft offered in future conflicts, he rose rapidly to command the RFC in France during the First World War despite handicaps that would have blighted conventional military careers: he was obstinate, tactless, inarticulate and chronically unable to remember names - yet he was able to inspire unflagging loyalty among all ranks. Despite his conspicuous distrust of politicians, he served as a successful Chief of the Air Staff for a decade after the war and then, at the personal request of the King, took over as Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, which he reorganised and reformed. He never wavered in his belief that mastery of the air could only be achieved by relentless offensive action, or in his determined advocacy of strategic bombing. His most enduring legacy was the creation of the finest air force in the world, engendered with the spirit that won the Battle of Britain.

Reshaping the Future

Author: Arduino Paniccia

Publisher: MAZZANTI LIBRI - ME PUBLISHER

ISBN: 8898109180

Category: Political Science

Page: 380

View: 7949


Having a strategy means finding solutions to the complexity of the global world. The task of this manual is pointing out a possible method to transform the future to our advantage and seize also economic and financial opportunities crucial to emerge in the global competition. The book provides an analysis of the evolution of strategic thought and method, from the dawn of nation-states until the civil war in Syria. What happens in this country is emblematic of the change in perspective and power in recent years. With the “preventive war” the West had come to the borders of India, but today we see the Chinese military presence in the Mediterranean. The structure of global power is increasingly oligarchic, Asian and present in a wider area. A triad that bears the names of the US, Russia and China. Europe is witnessing an inert vacuum created in the South, across the Mediterranean and North Africa. The old continent is in decline, and doesn’t have a real strategy. Part One: Introduction Part Two: History of Strategy (From the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century, Napoleon, Clausewitz, the Nineteenth Century, The First World War, The Second World War, The “Cold War”, The Unipolar Twenty Years) Part Three: The Current Phase of Transition towards a New Strategy (An oligarchic Future, The Higher Triad, The Lower Triad) Part IV: Conclusions (A New Definition of Strategy, Strategy and Conflict in a “Post-Heroic” Future, The Islamic World, An Eastern and Clausewitzian Conclusion).

An Ace of the Eighth

Author: Norman J. Fortier

Publisher: Presidio Press

ISBN: 0307414558

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 1406


FOR A FIGHTER PILOT IN THE MIGHTY EIGHTH, DEATH WAS ALWAYS A HEARTBEAT AWAY. When the skies of Europe blazed with the fiercest air battles in history, fighter pilots like Norman “Bud” Fortier were in the thick of it, flying four hundred miles an hour at thirty thousand feet, dodging flak and dueling with Nazi aces. In their role as “escorts” to Flying Fortresses and Liberators, the fighter squadrons’ ability to blast enemy aircraft from the sky was key to the success of pinpoint bombing raids on German oil refineries, communication and supply lines, and other crucial targets. Flying in formation with the bomber stream, Fortier and the rest of his squadron helped develop dive-bombing and strafing tactics for the Thunderbolts and Mustangs. As the war progressed, fighter squadrons began to carry out their own bombing missions. From blasting V-1 missile sites along France’s “rocket coast” and the hell-torn action of D day to the critical attacks on the Ruhr Valley and massive daylight raids on German industrial targets, Fortier was part of the Allies’ bitter struggle to bring the Nazi war machine to a halt. In describing his own hundred-plus missions and by including the accounts of fellow fighter pilots, Fortier recaptures the excitement and fiery terror of the world’s most dangerous cat-and-mouse game.

The Forgotten Few; The Indian Air Force in World War II

Author: KS Nair

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9353570689

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6090


The Forgotten Few is the first contemporary attempt to produce a historical narrative of the nation's contribution, specifically to the Air Force component, of World War II, which was an important part of our journey to Independence and national identity. Close to three million Indians served in uniform during the War. And yet, the Indian chapter of this globe-straddling story, reverberations of which still echo today, are barely known - a symptom of which was the recent controversy over the absence of Indians in the Christopher Nolan film Dunkirk. This book brings to light some of the lost stories of Indian aviators who built the very foundations of human and physical infrastructure for what is now the world's fourth largest air force. It benefits from several first-person interviews with some of the last Indian survivors of World War II, enabling a level of fidelity that is quite rare among Indian histories.

The Aeroplane

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Airplanes

Page: 784

View: 4522


Last of the Few

Author: Dilip Sarkar

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445610469

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 7227


Spitfire and Hurricane fighter pilots recount their experiences of combat during the Battle of Britain.

The Debt We Owe

Author: Edward Bishop

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 162

View: 2937


Lloyd George

Author: John Grigg

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571308740

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 702

View: 529


John Grigg's four volume life of Lloyd George is one of the great political biographies. This, the final volume, opens with Lloyd George's succession to the Premiership in December 1916, when Britain faced starvation and defeat through the German U-boat campaign, its allies France, Russia and Italy were tottering, the Liberal Party was bitterly divided and unrest in Ireland was growing. Worst of all, military chiefs regarded themselves as at least the equals of the government. To resolve these crises required ruthlessness, political genius and leadership of the highest order. In this thrilling book we see one of Britain's most resourceful Prime Ministers in brilliant action, steering his country to victory. It is a tragedy John Grigg didn't live to complete his magnum opus but what exists is a masterpiece. Faber Finds is reissuing the four volumes: The Young Lloyd George, Lloyd George: The People's Champion 1902-1911, Lloyd George: From Peace to War 1912-1916, Lloyd George: War Leader 1916-1918. 'With the volume, Grigg crowns the edifice of one of the great biographies of our time.' Anthony Howard - Sunday Times 'A fitting climax to a path-breaking study.' John Campbell, Independent, Books of the Year 'Superb... the fullest account we shall ever have of Lloyd George's career as a wartime Prime Minister. It is a fascinating story and is told with panache, vigour, clarity and impartiality by a great biographer... brings out as never before the brilliance of Lloyd George's finest hour.' Robert Blake, Evening Standard 'A major publishing event... Grigg mingles factual precision, high-interest value and judgements which are mostly as wise as they are forthright.' Roy Jenkins, Sunday Telegraph, Books of the Year 'Gripping... essential... This wonderful biography, clear and authoritative, every page a lesson in how to write narrative history, well up to its preceding volumes, recreates both a time of acute national danger and an extraordinary man.' Max Egremont, Financial Times