Vasilii Trediakovsky

Author: Irina Reyfman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804718240

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 2846


Vasilii Trediakovsky (1703-69) was one of the eighteenth century poets instrumental in creating a Russian literature based on West European models, yet a striking discrepancy exists between his obvious importance and his notoriously bad reputation among his contemporaries and later generations of Russian writers and critics. In exploring the mechanisms of the creation and transmission of literary reputation, the author uses material that is frequently dismissed as irrelevant and unreliable: rumors, anecdotes, and opinions. This material is used to detect mythological patterns in accounts of the historical past - in this case eighteenth-century Russian literature - and to investigate the role of mythmaking in modern cultural consciousness. This book argues that the Russian literary figures of the eighteenth century regarded their age as making a complete break with the past and entering into a totally new stage of historical development.

A Voltaire for Russia

Author: Amanda Ewington

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810126966

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 275

View: 3315


Revision of the author's thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Chicago, Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures, 2001.

Lost Kingdom

Author: Serhii Plokhy

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0241255589

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 5617


An astonishingly wide-ranging history of Russian nationalism chronicling Russia's yearning for Empire and how it has affected its politics for centuries In 2014, Russia annexed Crimea and attempted to seize a portion of Ukraine. While the world watched in outrage, this violation of national sovereignty was in fact only the latest iteration of a centuries-long effort to expand Russian boundaries and create a pan-Russian nation. In Lost Kingdom, award-winning historian Serhii Plokhy argues that we can only understand the merging of imperialism and nationalism in Russia today by delving into its history. Spanning over two thousand years, from the end of the Mongol rule to the present day, Plokhy shows how leaders from Ivan the Terrible to Joseph Stalin to Vladimir Putin have exploited existing forms of identity, warfare and territorial expansion to achieve imperial supremacy. A strikingly ambitious book, Lost Kingdomchronicles the long and belligerent history of Russia's empire and nation-building quest.

A Handbook to Classical Reception in Eastern and Central Europe

Author: Zara Martirosova Torlone,Dana LaCourse Munteanu,Dorota Dutsch

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118832728

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 632

View: 6152


A Handbook to Classical Reception in Eastern and Central Europe is the first comprehensive English?]language study of the reception of classical antiquity in Eastern and Central Europe. This groundbreaking work offers detailed case studies of thirteen countries that are fully contextualized historically, locally, and regionally. The first English-language collection of research and scholarship on Greco-Roman heritage in Eastern and Central Europe Written and edited by an international group of seasoned and up-and-coming scholars with vast subject-matter experience and expertise Essays from leading scholars in the field provide broad insight into the reception of the classical world within specific cultural and geographical areas Discusses the reception of many aspects of Greco-Roman heritage, such as prose/philosophy, poetry, material culture Offers broad and significant insights into the complicated engagement many countries of Eastern and Central Europe have had and continue to have with Greco-Roman antiquity

The Decembrist Myth in Russian Culture

Author: L. Trigos

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230104711

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 239

View: 3019


This book is the first interdisciplinary treatment of the cultural significance of the Decembrists' mythic image in Russian literature, history, film and opera in a survey of its deployment as cultural trope since the original 1825 rebellion and through the present day.

Reference Guide to Russian Literature

Author: Neil Cornwell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134260709

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1012

View: 3893


First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Ukraine and Russia

Author: Serhii Plokhy

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 144269193X

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 3299


The question of where Russian history ends and Ukrainian history begins has not yet received a satisfactory answer. Generations of historians referred to Kyiv, the capital of Ukraine, as the starting point of the Muscovite dynasty, the Russian state, and, ultimately, the Russian nation. However, the history of Kyiv and that of the Scythians of the Northern Black Sea region have also been claimed by Ukrainian historians, and are now regarded as integral parts of the history of Ukraine. If these are actually the beginnings of Ukrainian history, when does Russian history start? In Ukraine and Russia, Serhii Plokhy discusses many questions fundamental to the formation of modern Russian and Ukrainian historical identity. He investigates the critical role of history in the development of modern national identities and offers historical and cultural insight into the current state of relations between the two nations. Plokhy shows how history has been constructed, used, and misused in order to justify the existence of imperial and modern national projects, and how those projects have influenced the interpretation of history in Russia and Ukraine. This book makes important assertions not only about the conflicts and negotiations inherent to opposing historiographic traditions, but about ways of overcoming the limitations imposed by those traditions.

A History of Russian Literature

Author: Andrew Kahn,Mark Lipovetsky,Irina Reyfman,Stephanie Sandler

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192549537

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 860

View: 8401


Russia possesses one of the richest and most admired literatures of Europe, reaching back to the eleventh century. A History of Russian Literature provides a comprehensive account of Russian writing from its earliest origins in the monastic works of Kiev up to the present day, still rife with the creative experiments of post-Soviet literary life. The volume proceeds chronologically in five parts, extending from Kievan Rus' in the 11th century to the present day.The coverage strikes a balance between extensive overview and in-depth thematic focus. Parts are organized thematically in chapters, which a number of keywords that are important literary concepts that can serve as connecting motifs and 'case studies', in-depth discussions of writers, institutions, and texts that take the reader up close and. Visual material also underscores the interrelation of the word and image at a number of points, particularly significant in the medieval period and twentieth century. The History addresses major continuities and discontinuities in the history of Russian literature across all periods, and in particular bring out trans-historical features that contribute to the notion of a national literature. The volume's time-range has the merit of identifying from the early modern period a vital set of national stereotypes and popular folklore about boundaries, space, Holy Russia, and the charismatic king that offers culturally relevant material to later writers. This volume delivers a fresh view on a series of key questions about Russia's literary history, by providing new mappings of literary history and a narrative that pursues key concepts (rather more than individual authorial careers). This holistic narrative underscores the ways in which context and text are densely woven in Russian literature, and demonstrates that the most exciting way to understand the canon and the development of tradition is through a discussion of the interrelation of major and minor figures, historical events and literary politics, literary theory and literary innovation.

Literature on Trial

Author: Sylwia Dominika Chrostowska

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442643560

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 289

View: 4599


Literature on Trial traces the rise of modern literary criticism in Central and Eastern Europe during the eighteenth century. S.D. Chrostowska juxtaposes the discourse's written forms in three linguistic-cultural regions — Germany, Poland, and Russia — to show how fluid the relationship once was between the genres of criticism and those of literature. An alternative history of literary criticism, Literature on Trial marks a shift from earlier studies' focus on aesthetic principles to an emphasis on the development of literary-critical forms. Chrostowska relates cultural and institutional changes in these areas to the formation of literary-critical knowledge. She accounts for the ways in which critical discourse organized itself formally and deemed some genres 'proper' while eliminating others. Analysing works by Lessing, Goethe, and Karamzin, among others, Literature on Trial brings a fresh theoretical perspective to the links between genre as a discursive strategy and socio-political life.