Walden and Civil Disobedience

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781533362834

Category:

Page: 168

View: 1033


Walden and Civil Disobedience Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862) Walden Walden (first published as Walden; or, Life in the Woods), by noted transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau, is a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and (to some degree) manual for self-reliance. Thoreau also used this time to write his first book, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers. First published in 1854, Walden details Thoreau's experiences over the course of two years, two months, and two days in a cabin he built near Walden Pond, amidst woodland owned by his friend and mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, near Concord, Massachusetts. The book compresses the time into a single calendar year and uses passages of four seasons to symbolize human development. By immersing himself in nature, Thoreau hoped to gain a more objective understanding of society through personal introspection. Simple living and self-sufficiency were Thoreau's other goals, and the whole project was inspired by transcendentalist philosophy, a central theme of the American Romantic Period. On the Duty of Civil Disobedience Civil Disobedience is an essay by Henry David Thoreau. Published in 1849 under the title Resistance to Civil Government, it expressed Thoreau's belief that people should not allow governments to overrule or atrophy their consciences, and that people have a duty both to avoid doing injustice directly and to avoid allowing their acquiescence to enable the government to make them the agents of injustice. Thoreau was motivated in part by his disgust with slavery and the Mexican-American War.

Walden and Civil Disobedience

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743487729

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 809


Naturalist and philosopher Thoreau's timeless essays on the role of humanity -- in the world of nature, and in society and government.

Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 483

View: 6537


"Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience" by Henry David Thoreau. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Walden, Civil Disobedience, and Other Writings

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 672

View: 7096


In addition to the texts of 'Walden' and 'Civil Disobedience', this revised and expanded 'Norton Critical Edition' reprints the increasingly important works 'Slavery in Massachusetts', 'Walking' and 'Wild Apples'. All texts are accompanied by annotations.

Civil Disobedience, and Other Essays

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486275639

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 90

View: 3367


Thoreau has inspired generations of readers to think for themselves and to find meaning and beauty in nature. This sampling includes five of his most frequently read and cited essays: "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" (1849), "Life without Principle" (1863), "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), "A Plea for Captain John Brown" (1869) and "Walking" (1862).

Walden and Civil Disobedience

Author: Henry David Thoreau,General Press

Publisher: GENERAL PRESS

ISBN: 9387669882

Category: Fiction

Page: 424

View: 6470


Walden is a book written by Henry David Thoreau, a reflection upon simple living in nature. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and manual for self-reliance. By immersing himself in nature, Thoreau hoped to gain a more objective understanding of society through personal introspection. Simple living and self-sufficiency were Thoreau's other goals, and the whole project was inspired by transcendentalist philosophy. Civil Disobedience is thought to have originated after Thoreau spent a night in jail for refusing to pay taxes to a government with whose policies he did not agree. Assigning greater importance to the conscience of the individual than the governing law, Civil Disobedience is an internationally admired work that is known to have influenced writer Leo Tolstoy and political activist Mahatma Gandhi, and many members of the American Civil Rights Movement. Now available together in one chic and affordable edition as part of the Word Cloud Classics series, Walden and Civil Disobedience makes an attractive addition to any library.

Walden

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Harcourt College Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Authors, American

Page: 304

View: 9822


Two of Thoreau's classic essays on simple living and on protesting against government's interference with individual liberty, plus a selection of his poetry.

Walden and Civil Disobedience

Author: Henry David Thoreau,Digital Fire

Publisher: DIGITAL FIRE

ISBN: 9354990053

Category: Fiction

Page: 460

View: 3470


Philosopher, naturalist, poet and rugged individualist, Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862) has inspired generations of readers to think for themselves, to follow the dictates of their own conscience and to make an art of their lives. This representative sampling of his thought includes five of his most frequently cited and read essays: "Civil Disobedience," his most powerful and influential political essay, exalts the law of conscience over civil law. "Life without Principle" distills the essence of Thoreau's philosophy of self-reliance and individualism. "Slavery in Massachusetts" is a searing attack on government condonation of slavery. "A Plea for Captain John Brown" is an eloquent defense of the radical abolitionist, while "Walking" celebrates the joys of that activity and pleads for conservation of the earth's wild places. The latter essay is recognized as one of the pioneer documents in the conservation and national park movement in America.