When Women Were Birds

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 9780374288976

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 6590


The beloved author of Refuge returns with a work that explodes and startles, illuminates and celebrates Terry Tempest Williams’s mother told her: “I am leaving you all my journals, but you must promise me you won’t look at them until after I’m gone.” Readers of Williams’s iconic and unconventional memoir, Refuge, well remember that mother. She was one of a large Mormon clan in northern Utah who developed cancer as a result of the nuclear testing in nearby Nevada. It was a shock to Williams to discover that her mother had kept journals. But not as much of a shock as what she found when the time came to read them. “They were exactly where she said they would be: three shelves of beautiful cloth-bound books . . . I opened the first journal. It was empty. I opened the second journal. It was empty. I opened the third. It too was empty . . . Shelf after shelf after shelf, all of my mother’s journals were blank.” What did Williams’s mother mean by that? In fifty-four chapters that unfold like a series of yoga poses, each with its own logic and beauty, Williams creates a lyrical and caring meditation of the mystery of her mother's journals. When Women Were Birds is a kaleidoscope that keeps turning around the question “What does it mean to have a voice?”

When Women Were Birds

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Sarah Crichton Books

ISBN: 1429942827

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 583


The beloved author of Refuge returns with a work that explodes and startles, illuminates and celebrates Terry Tempest Williams's mother told her: "I am leaving you all my journals, but you must promise me you won't look at them until after I'm gone." Readers of Williams's iconic and unconventional memoir, Refuge, well remember that mother. She was one of a large Mormon clan in northern Utah who developed cancer as a result of the nuclear testing in nearby Nevada. It was a shock to Williams to discover that her mother had kept journals. But not as much of a shock as what she found when the time came to read them. "They were exactly where she said they would be: three shelves of beautiful cloth-bound books . . . I opened the first journal. It was empty. I opened the second journal. It was empty. I opened the third. It too was empty . . . Shelf after shelf after shelf, all of my mother's journals were blank." What did Williams's mother mean by that? In fifty-four chapters that unfold like a series of yoga poses, each with its own logic and beauty, Williams creates a lyrical and caring meditation of the mystery of her mother's journals. When Women Were Birds is a kaleidoscope that keeps turning around the question "What does it mean to have a voice?"

Systemic Inequality, Sustainability and COVID-19

Author: Seela Aladuwaka,Barbara Wejnert,Ram Alagan

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 1801177341

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 3641


Systemic Inequality, Sustainability and COVID-19 provides an opportunity to engage in a critical dialog on the consequences and interactions of COVID-19 with social inequalities and environment management.

Animalities

Author: Michael Lundblad

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 1474400035

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 7326


New and cutting-edge work in animality studies, human-animal studies, and posthumanismRepresentations of animality continue to proliferate in various kinds of literary and cultural texts. This pioneering volume explores the critical interface between animal and animality studies, marking out the terrain in relation to twentieth-century literature and film. The range of texts considered here is intentionally broad, answering questions like, how do contemporary writers such as Amitav Ghosh, Terry Tempest Williams, and Indra Sinha help us to think about not only animals but also humans as animals? What kinds of creatures are being constructed by contemporary artists such as Patricia Piccinini, Alexis Rockman, and Michael Pestel? How do aanimalities animate such diverse texts as the poetry of two women publishing under the name of aMichael Field, or an early film by Thomas Edison depicting the electrocution of a circus elephant named Topsy? Connecting these issues to fields as diverse as environmental studies and ecocriticism, queer theory, gender studies, feminist theory, illness and disability studies, postcolonial theory, and biopolitics, the volume also raises further questions about disciplinarity itself, while hoping to inspire further work abeyond the human in future interdisciplinary scholarship.Key Features10 provocative case studies focused on representations and discourses of animals and animality in twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature, art, and film in EnglishNew work from both internationally renowned and emerging figures in the burgeoning fields of animality studies, human-animal studies, and posthumanism, suggesting innovative and significant new directions to exploreBroad introduction to the kinds of questions scholars in the humanities have considered in relation to animals and animality

Rachel Carson and Her Sisters

Author: Robert K Musil

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813562430

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 328

View: 6634


In Rachel Carson and Her Sisters, Robert K. Musil redefines the achievements and legacy of environmental pioneer and scientist Rachel Carson, linking her work to a wide network of American women activists and writers and introducing her to a new, contemporary audience. Rachel Carson was the first American to combine two longstanding, but separate strands of American environmentalism—the love of nature and a concern for human health. Widely known for her 1962 best-seller, Silent Spring, Carson is today often perceived as a solitary “great woman,” whose work single-handedly launched a modern environmental movement. But as Musil demonstrates, Carson’s life’s work drew upon and was supported by already existing movements, many led by women, in conservation and public health. On the fiftieth anniversary of her death, this book helps underscore Carson’s enduring environmental legacy and brings to life the achievements of women writers and advocates, such as Ellen Swallow Richards, Dr. Alice Hamilton, Terry Tempest Williams, Sandra Steingraber, Devra Davis, and Theo Colborn, all of whom overcame obstacles to build and lead the modern American environmental movement.

Birds and Cages

Author: Ida Tomshinsky

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1796022098

Category: Nature

Page: 108

View: 6697


We are not afraid to say that we are fascinated by birds. Flying birds always provoke human admiration. There is this unexplained mysterious feeling that surrounds us when watching birds on the forest trees, in our backyard, at the ocean, sea, or lake. Birds are an infinite treasure of inspiration for humans, waking us up in the morning with beautiful birdsongs. Their little brain is of a size of an unshelled walnut and is associated with intelligent behavior and the same capabilities of humans and apes’ mental tasks. When you think about all the animals in the world, you quickly realize that birds are, in fact, among some of the most intelligent creatures we have on earth. Although there are more than ten thousand bird species worldwide, only a handful of them have made the list for the extremely talented and incredibly intelligent. So who are these super intelligent feathered friends? It is difficult to pick one. Perhaps kea, ravens, and crows are equally smart; while macaws, cockatoo, and jays are on the top of any list too. Who knew that an African gray is capable of working out the location of hidden food by using the kind of deduction and elimination skills previously seen only in humans and apes? And as you probably have heard, they are exceptional talkers! Today, we all know that it is bad to imprison birds in cages, but it was not always the case throughout the history. According to Stephen King, “Some birds are not meant to be caged, that’s all. Their feathers are too bright, their songs too sweet and wild.” Due to beautiful poetry and cultural expressions, the flying bird became a symbol of freedom and independence. There are cases of historic acknowledgment of birdcages, especially in the Victorian era. People were listening to birdsongs in cages as it was their radio entertainment outlet. During wartimes, birds demonstrated their unique abilities in courageous heroic efforts to help humans in transferring information through the battlefields. The birds and birdcages both have a longtime history. Our love for the amazing earth creatures makes us stand out for their protection and safety to enjoy our shared inhabitants on the planet, and as for the birdcages, people find them pretty appealing in various ways of the aesthetic repurposing.

The Bird-Friendly City

Author: Timothy Beatley

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 164283047X

Category: Architecture

Page: 271

View: 9205


How does a bird experience a city? A backyard? A park? As the world has become more urban, noisier from increased traffic, and brighter from streetlights and office buildings, it has also become more dangerous for countless species of birds. Warblers become disoriented by nighttime lights and collide with buildings. Ground-feeding sparrows fall prey to feral cats. Hawks and other birds-of-prey are sickened by rat poison. These name just a few of the myriad hazards. How do our cities need to change in order to reduce the threats, often created unintentionally, that have resulted in nearly three billion birds lost in North America alone since the 1970s? In The Bird-Friendly City, Timothy Beatley, a longtime advocate for intertwining the built and natural environments, takes readers on a global tour of cities that are reinventing the status quo with birds in mind. Efforts span a fascinating breadth of approaches: public education, urban planning and design, habitat restoration, architecture, art, civil disobedience, and more. Beatley shares empowering examples, including: advocates for “catios,” enclosed outdoor spaces that allow cats to enjoy backyards without being able to catch birds; a public relations campaign for vultures; and innovations in building design that balance aesthetics with preventing bird strikes. Through these changes and the others Beatley describes, it is possible to make our urban environments more welcoming to many bird species. Readers will come away motivated to implement and advocate for bird-friendly changes, with inspiring examples to draw from. Whether birds are migrating and need a temporary shelter or are taking up permanent residence in a backyard, when the environment is safer for birds, humans are happier as well.

Be with Me Always

Author: Randon Billings Noble

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 1496205049

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 185

View: 6502


“Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you!” Thus does Heathcliff beg his dead Cathy in Wuthering Heights. He wants to be haunted—he insists on it. Randon Billings Noble does too. Instead of exorcising the ghosts of her past, she hopes for their cold hands to knock at the window and to linger. Be with Me Always is a collection of essays that explore hauntedness by considering how the ghosts of our pasts cling to us. In a way, all good essays are about the things that haunt us until we have somehow embraced or understood them. Here, Noble considers the ways she has been haunted—by a near-death experience, the gaze of a nude model, thoughts of widowhood, Anne Boleyn’s violent death, a book she can’t stop reading, a past lover who shadows her thoughts—in essays both pleasant and bitter, traditional and lyrical, and persistently evocative and unforgettable.

Mormon Feminism

Author: Joanna Brooks,Rachel Hunt Steenblik,Hannah Wheelwright

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0190248033

Category: Religion

Page: 345

View: 1735


This collection gathers together the essential writings of the contemporary Mormon feminist movement--from its historic beginnings in the 1970s to its vibrant present, offering the best Mormon feminist thought and writing. The selections in this book -many gathered from out-of-print anthologies, magazines, and other ephemera--walk the reader through the history of Mormon feminism, from the second-wave feminism of the 1970s to contemporary debates over the ordination of women. Collecting essays, speeches, poems, and prose, Mormon Feminism presents the diverse voices of Mormon women as they challenge assumptions and stereotypes, push for progress and change in the contemporary LDS Church, and band together with other feminists of faith hoping to build a better world.

The Songs of Trees

Author: David George Haskell

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698176502

Category: Nature

Page: 304

View: 4316


WINNER OF THE 2018 JOHN BURROUGHS MEDAL FOR OUTSTANDING NATURAL HISTORY WRITING “Both a love song to trees, an exploration of their biology, and a wonderfully philosophical analysis of their role they play in human history and in modern culture.” —Science Friday The author of Sounds Wild and Broken and the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Forest Unseen visits with nature’s most magnificent networkers — trees David Haskell has won acclaim for eloquent writing and deep engagement with the natural world. Now, he brings his powers of observation to the biological networks that surround all species, including humans. Haskell repeatedly visits a dozen trees, exploring connections with people, microbes, fungi, and other plants and animals. He takes us to trees in cities (from Manhattan to Jerusalem), forests (Amazonian, North American, and boreal) and areas on the front lines of environmental change (eroding coastlines, burned mountainsides, and war zones.) In each place he shows how human history, ecology, and well-being are intimately intertwined with the lives of trees. Scientific, lyrical, and contemplative, Haskell reveals the biological connections that underpin all life. In a world beset by barriers, he reminds us that life’s substance and beauty emerge from relationship and interdependence.